Paul Revere Williams Wins 2017 AIA Gold Medal

Paul Revere Williams Wins 2017 AIA Gold Medal, LAX Theme Building, 1961. Image © Flickr user thomashawk. Licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0
LAX Theme Building, 1961. Image © Flickr user thomashawk. Licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has announced Paul Revere Williams, FAIA as the posthumous winner of the 2017 AIA Gold Medal. With a portfolio of nearly 3,000 buildings over five decades, Williams’ career was notable for breaking boundaries within the profession as the first black member of the AIA.

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Paul Revere Williams. Image Courtesy of AIA

Paul Revere Williams. Image Courtesy of AIA

“This is a moment in our Institute’s history that is so important to recognize and acknowledge the work of a champion,” said Phil Freelon, FAIA, Managing and Design Director at Perkins + Will, who presented to the AIA Board of Directors on behalf of Williams. “It’s been many decades but Paul Williams is finally being recognized for the brilliant work he did over many years.”

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La Concha Motel, Las Vegas, 1961 (now Neon Museum). Image Courtesy of AIA

La Concha Motel, Las Vegas, 1961 (now Neon Museum). Image Courtesy of AIA

A native of Los Angeles, Williams was known for his many schools, public buildings, and churches in a variety of styles, notably the Palm Springs Tennis Center (1946) and the space-age LAX Theme Building (1961). Eight of his buildings have been named to to the National Register of Historic Places.

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Guardian Angel Cathedral, Las Vegas, 1961. Image Courtesy of AIA

Guardian Angel Cathedral, Las Vegas, 1961. Image Courtesy of AIA

“Our profession desperately needs more architects like Paul Williams,” wrote William J. Bates, FAIA, in his support of William’s nomination for the AIA Gold Medal. “His pioneering career has encouraged others to cross a chasm of historic biases. I can’t think of another architect whose work embodies the spirit of the Gold Medal better. His recognition demonstrates a significant shift in the equity for the profession and the institute.”

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LAX Theme Building, 1961. Image Courtesy of AIA

LAX Theme Building, 1961. Image Courtesy of AIA

As the 73rd AIA Gold Medalist, Williams joins an esteemed list of winners including Frank Lloyd Wright (1949), Louis Sullivan (1944), Le Corbusier (1961), Louis I. Kahn (1971), I.M. Pei (1979), Thom Mayne (2013), Julia Morgan (2014), Moshe Safdie (2015). Last year, the prize was given to Denise Scott Brown & Robert Venturi, the first time the Gold Medal was given to a pair of architects.

Read more about Williams’ nomination here.

News via AIA.

Spotlight: Benedetta Tagliabue

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Courtesy of RIBA

Courtesy of RIBA

Benedetta Tagliabue (born 24 June 1963) is an Italian architect known for designs which are sensitive to their context and yet still experimental in their approach to forms and materials. Her diverse and complex works have marked out her Barcelona-based firm EMBT as one of the most respected Spanish practices of the 21st century.

Santa Caterina Market. Image © Flickr user ligthelm licensed under CC BY 2.0Copagri Pavilion ‘Love IT’. Image © Marcela GrassiScottish Parliament Building. Image © Dave MorrisThe Spanish Pavilion at the 2010 Shanghai Expo.+9

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Spotlight: Benedetta Tagliabue, Santa Caterina Market. Image © Flickr user ligthelm licensed under CC BY 2.0

Santa Caterina Market. Image © Flickr user ligthelm licensed under CC BY 2.0
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Santa Caterina Market. Image © Ceramica Cumella

Santa Caterina Market. Image © Ceramica Cumella

Born in Milan, Tagliabue graduated from the Istituto Universitario di Architettura di Venezia in 1989. In the early 1990s, she married Spanish architect Enric Miralles and the pair founded their studio Miralles Tagliabue EMBT. Together, Miralles and Tagliabue designed some of the practice’s most notable works, including the renovation of the Santa Caterina Market in Barcelona and the enormous edifice of the Scottish Parliament Building – a building which critic Charles Jencks described as “a kind of small city,” reflecting the complexity and intricacy of the Edinburgh streets which it responds to.

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Scottish Parliament Building. Image © Dave Morris

Scottish Parliament Building. Image © Dave Morris

However, following Enric Miralles’ tragically premature death in 2000, Tagliabue took over the firm as a sole director, completing the Santa Caterina market, Edinburgh Parliament and a string of other projects besides. In recent years, the firm’s most striking work has perhaps been the Spanish Pavilion completed for the 2010 Shanghai Expo, a design which epitomizes their philosophy of continuing curiosity and material experimentation.

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Diagonal Mar Park. Image © Flickr user oh-barcelona licensed under CC BY 2.0

Diagonal Mar Park. Image © Flickr user oh-barcelona licensed under CC BY 2.0

To this day, Tagliabue refers to her late husband as one of her greatest influences, and in 2011 she founded the Foundation Enric Miralles, with the mission of promoting and teaching the philosophies of inquiry and experiment that are fundamental to his legacy.

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The Spanish Pavilion at the 2010 Shanghai Expo.

The Spanish Pavilion at the 2010 Shanghai Expo.

See all the works of EMBT featured on ArchDaily via the thumbnails below, and more coverage ofBenedetta Tagliabue below that:

Copagri Pavilion ‘Love IT’. Image © Marcela GrassiScottish Parliament Building. Image © Dave MorrisBarajas Social Housing Blocks. Image © Roland Halbe9 Flats low cost renovation in the Gothic Quarter of Barcelona. Image © Marcela Grassi+9

Interview with Benedetta Tagliabue: Looking at Buildings as if They Were Decomposing and Becoming New Sketches

Benedetta Tagliabue to Recieve 2013 RIBA Jencks Award

Benedetta Tagliabue Appointed as Newest Pritzker Prize Jury Member

Spotlight: Emilio Ambasz

© via azureazure.com
© via azureazure.com

As early as the 1970s, Emilio Ambasz (born 13 June 1943) initiated a discussion on sustainability through his work with green spaces and buildings which is arguably more important today than ever, and contributed to theoretical and design discourse outside of architecture through his wide variety of interest and career pursuits. Ambasz’s work has crossed several disciplines; he has been a curator, a professor, an industrial designer, and an architect, and is highly regarded in all of these varied pursuits.

Fukuoka Prefectural International Hall (1995). Image © Flickr user kentamabuchi licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0Cordoba House (1975). Image © Michele AlassioBanca dell’Occhio (2008). Image © Emilio AmbaszLucile Halsell Conservatory at the San Antonio Botanical Garden (1988). Image © Flickr user joevare licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0+9

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Fukuoka Prefectural International Hall (1995). Image © Flickr user kentamabuchi licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Fukuoka Prefectural International Hall (1995). Image © Flickr user kentamabuchi licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Born in Chaco, Argentina, Ambasz knew from an early age that he wanted to be an architect. According toa 2009 article in Architect Magazine, so great was his determination that at age 16 he worked for an architecture firm during the day while attending high school during the night. [1] Ambasz also had an appetite for education graduating from Princeton with a Bachelors degree and then a Master of Fine Arts in Architecture just a year later. His jump through the ranks of architectural academia led him to a brief career as a professor, but his work quickly brought the attention of scholars and professionals alike, and by age 25 Ambasz was working as the Curator of the Department of Architecture and Design for The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City.

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Banca dell’Occhio (2008). Image © Emilio Ambasz

Banca dell’Occhio (2008). Image © Emilio Ambasz

While at MoMA, Ambasz curated several critically acclaimed exhibitions, including “Italy: The New Domestic Landscape,” and “Universitas.” Curatorial duties provided Ambasz with an opportunity to investigate broad societal questions in a very public setting; in “Universitas,” Ambasz organized a collection of work which asked how universities should address nature from an educational perspective. Seemingly energized by the fields he was researching, Ambasz left MoMA in 1976 to establish himself as an industrial designer.

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Banca dell’Occhio (2008). Image © Emilio Ambasz

Banca dell’Occhio (2008). Image © Emilio Ambasz

As an independent designer, Ambasz had even greater success; the Vertebra chair, which he developed with Giancarlo Piretti, was one of the first office furniture to emphasize ergonomics over aesthetics. Ambasz’s architectural projects take a distinctive approach to design: within his works, nature must interact with the structure in a way he calls “green over the gray.” [2] In many of his projects, this idea manifests itself through green roofs and gardens built into the projects. His projects, such as the Cordoba House (1975) the Lucile Halsell Conservatory (1988), and the Fukuoka Prefectural International Hall (1994) combine nature with a sensitive response to clients’ needs and the architect’s desire to create compelling images. More recent works, such as the Banca dell’Occhio (2008) and Museum of Modern Art and Cinema (2010), continue this trend. By using this approach and executing it with ecologically friendly design elements, Ambasz demonstrated that sustainability could produce architecturally compelling buildings.

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Cordoba House (1975). Image © Michele Alassio

Cordoba House (1975). Image © Michele Alassio

Unifying the many occupations Ambasz has held during his life is a deep love of creativity. Ambasz offers poignant insight into his career in a quote to Architect Magazine:

“Many years ago, Alessandro Mendini, who at the time was the editor of Domus, asked me how I would define myself professionally. And I said I would define myself as an inventor. To me, architecture is an act of the imagination. Industrial design is an act of the imagination.” [1]

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Lucile Halsell Conservatory at the San Antonio Botanical Garden (1988). Image © Flickr user joevare licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

Lucile Halsell Conservatory at the San Antonio Botanical Garden (1988). Image © Flickr user joevare licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

See Emilio Ambasz’s works featured on ArchDaily via the thumbnails below:

MoMA Announces a Major Retrospective to Commemorate Frank Lloyd Wright’s 150th Birthday

Today, the Museum of Modern Art in New York announced a major retrospective of Frank Lloyd Wright’s work to be displayed in 2017, commemorating 150 years since the architect’s birth. Opening next June, the exhibition will feature approximately 450 works spanning Wright’s career including architectural drawings, models, building fragments, films, television broadcasts, print media, furniture, tableware, textiles, paintings, photographs, and scrapbooks, along with several works that have rarely or never been shown publicly.

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MoMA Announces a Major Retrospective to Commemorate Frank Lloyd Wright’s 150th Birthday, Plan for Greater Baghdad. Unbuilt project. 1957-58. 34 7/8 × 52″ (88.6 × 132.1 cm). Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Plan for Greater Baghdad. Unbuilt project. 1957-58. 34 7/8 × 52″ (88.6 × 132.1 cm). Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

The exhibition will be structured as an “anthology” of Wright’s work, separated into 12 sections dedicated to a key project or set of pieces from the Frank Lloyd Wright Archive, which was acquired in 2012 by MoMAin conjunction with the Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library at Columbia University. Models and drawings from works such as Unity Temple (1905–08), the Robie House (1908–10), Fallingwater (1934–37), the Johnson Wax Administration Building (1936–39), and Beth Sholom Synagogue (1953–59) will be on display, alongside investigations into lesser-known projects such as his proposed design for the Rosenwald School for African American children and Wright’s design for a model farm.

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Press conference unveiling The Mile-High Illinois (Chicago, Illinois). Unbuilt Project. 1956. Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Press conference unveiling The Mile-High Illinois (Chicago, Illinois). Unbuilt Project. 1956. Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

The exhibition will also cover Wright’s use of ornament, circular geometries and his Native American-inspired designs. Other considerations of the retrospective will be the intersection of nature, landscape, and architecture, and the contrast between the architect’s call for the democratization of the profession and his celebrity and media prowess.

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Rosenwald Foundation School (La Jolla, California). Unbuilt Project. 1928. Pencil and color pencil on tracing paper. 12 3/4 x 25 7/8” (32.4 x 65.7 cm). Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Rosenwald Foundation School (La Jolla, California). Unbuilt Project. 1928. Pencil and color pencil on tracing paper. 12 3/4 x 25 7/8” (32.4 x 65.7 cm). Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)
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Raul Bailleres House (Acapulco, Mexico). Unbuilt Project. 1952. Brown ink, pencil and color pencil on tracing paper. 31 3/4 x 52 7/8″ (80.6 x 134.3 cm). Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Raul Bailleres House (Acapulco, Mexico). Unbuilt Project. 1952. Brown ink, pencil and color pencil on tracing paper. 31 3/4 x 52 7/8″ (80.6 x 134.3 cm). Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

A recently restored model of one of Wright’s proposed towers designed to cluster around St. Mark’s Church-in-the-Bowery, deemed too radical for the tastes of the time, will conclude the exhibition. The final section will also include the model of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, a historical analysis of drawings, and a data-visualization project illustrating the architect’s global network of clients, professional relationships, and buildings.

The exhibition is scheduled to run from June 12 – October 1, 2017.

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Liberty Magazine Cover. 1926. Color pencil on paper. 24 1/2 x 28 1/4″ (62.2 x 71.8 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives. Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Liberty Magazine Cover. 1926. Color pencil on paper. 24 1/2 x 28 1/4″ (62.2 x 71.8 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives. Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)
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Model of St. Mark’s-in-the-Bouwerie. Unbuilt project. New York, New York. 1927-31. Painted wood. 53 x 16 x 16″ (134.6 x 40.6 x 40.6 cm). Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Model of St. Mark’s-in-the-Bouwerie. Unbuilt project. New York, New York. 1927-31. Painted wood. 53 x 16 x 16″ (134.6 x 40.6 x 40.6 cm). Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Spotlight: William Pereira

Courtesy of UC Irvine Special Collections and Archives
Courtesy of UC Irvine Special Collections and Archives

Winner of the 1942 Acadamy Award for Best Special Effects, William Pereira (April 25, 1909 – November 13, 1985) also designed some of America’s most iconic examples of futurist architecture, with his heavy stripped down functionalism becoming the symbol of many US institutions and cities. Working with his more prolific film-maker brother Hal Pereira, William Pereira’s talent as an art director translated into a long and prestigious career creating striking and idiosyncratic buildings across the West Coast of America.

Transamerica Pyramid. Image Courtesy of Flickr user jkz licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0Thene Building, LAX. Image © Flickr user Arch_sam licensed under CC BY 2.0Jack Langson Library at University of California (Irvine). Image Courtesy of Wikimedia user TFNorman (public domain)Geisel Library. Image © Darren Bradley+12

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Geisel Library. Image © Darren Bradley

Geisel Library. Image © Darren Bradley
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Transamerica Pyramid. Image Courtesy of Flickr user jkz licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Transamerica Pyramid. Image Courtesy of Flickr user jkz licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Born to Portugese immigrants in Chicago, Pereira graudated from the University of Illinois and rapidly established himself as a prominent figure, designing a few notable Art Deco buildings and helping to draft the masterplan for the 1933 Chicago World’s Fair. Moving to Los Angles and becoming involved in the film industry with his brother Hal in 1930, it wasn’t until his partnership with Charles Luckman in the 1950s that his distinctive style of heavy masses with stripped down detailing emerged, becoming increasingly radical as his career progressed.

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Thene Building, LAX. Image © Flickr user Arch_sam licensed under CC BY 2.0

Thene Building, LAX. Image © Flickr user Arch_sam licensed under CC BY 2.0
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University of California, Irvine, 1966. Image Courtesy of Orange County Archives

University of California, Irvine, 1966. Image Courtesy of Orange County Archives

In 1958 Pereira & Luckman completed perhaps their most famous work, the Googie-styled Theme Building at Los Angles International Airport. Splitting from Luckman in 1959 and forming his own, independent practice, Pereira’s work became a whirlwind of concrete, completing as many as 250 projects in the 1960s and 1970s, and working on increasingly high profile landmark commissions. His austere geometrical style was soon to be seen in pyramids, ziggurats and domes in a variety of areas along the West Coast, including the San Diego International Airport (1959), plans and buildings for campuses for theUniversities of Southern CaliforniaCalifornia (Irvine) and Pepperdine, the sprawling Los Angles County Museum of Art, and of course his two most prominent landmarks: the inverted ziggurat of the Geisel Library and perhaps the most recognizable building in San Francisco, the Transamerica Pyramid.

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Jack Langson Library at University of California (Irvine). Image Courtesy of Wikimedia user TFNorman (public domain)

Jack Langson Library at University of California (Irvine). Image Courtesy of Wikimedia user TFNorman (public domain)
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Pacific Life Headquarters, Newport Beach. Image © Wikimedia user Coolcaesar licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

Pacific Life Headquarters, Newport Beach. Image © Wikimedia user Coolcaesar licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

Pereira’s forays into urban planning were also suitably monolithic, for example the masterplan for theCalifornian city of Irvine, a tightly regulated planned city around the campus of the University of California. Initially planning for a new city of 50,000, Irvine’s regimented plan of individually planned and styled villages has since swelled to more than 4 times that size. His plan for the university, with starkbrutalist buildings jutting out of the hillside on concrete platforms, formed an academic island within the suburbs he designed.

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University of California, Irvine Campus, at the center of Pereira's planned development at Irvine. Image © Wikimedia user Poppashoppa22 licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

University of California, Irvine Campus, at the center of Pereira’s planned development at Irvine. Image © Wikimedia user Poppashoppa22 licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0
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Transamerica Pyramid. Image Courtesy of Flickr user jkz licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Transamerica Pyramid. Image Courtesy of Flickr user jkz licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Find out more about one of Pereira’s most famous works, the Geisel Library at the University of California San Diego, via the thumbnails below:

Spotlight: Jan Kaplický

via jan-kaplicky.com
via jan-kaplicky.com

Radical neofuturist architect Jan Kaplický (18 April 1937 – 14 January 2009) was the son of a sculptor and a botanical illustrator, and appropriately spent his career creating highly sculptural and organic forms. Working with partner Amanda Levete at his suitably named practice Future Systems, Kaplický was catapulted to fame after his sensationally avant-garde 1999 Lord’s Cricket Ground Media Centre and became a truly innovative icon of avant-garde architecture.

Selfridges at the Birmingham Bullring Centre, 2003. Image © Flickr user Bs0u10e0 licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0Lord's Cricket Ground Media Centre, 1999. Image © Flickr user jamiedfw licensed under CC BY 2.0Model of 2007's Czech National Library proposal. Image © Jan Kaplický+12

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© Jan Kaplický

© Jan Kaplický
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© Jan Kaplický

© Jan Kaplický

Beginning his career in Czechoslovakia, where he studied at the College of Applied Arts and Architecture and Design in Prague, Kaplický fled to London in the wake of the 1968 Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia and soon found himself working on the design for the Centre Georges Pompidou under Richard Rogersand Renzo Piano. Moving to Foster and Partners after Rogers and Piano relocated to Paris, he later set upFuture Systems in 1979, producing intricate and outlandish drawings of orbiting robots and homes transportable by helicopter.

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Hauer-King House, London, 1994. Image © Flickr user zongo licensed under CC BY 2.0

Hauer-King House, London, 1994. Image © Flickr user zongo licensed under CC BY 2.0
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Lord's Cricket Ground Media Centre, 1999. Image © Flickr user bensutherland licensed under CC BY 2.0

Lord’s Cricket Ground Media Centre, 1999. Image © Flickr user bensutherland licensed under CC BY 2.0

For the first decade of Future Systems’ existence these fantastical plans did not drive commissions for actual buildings, but built projects in the 1990s – including 1994’s Hauer-King House – supplied ever increasing amounts of attention to Kaplický’s elegantly radical projects, culminating in 1999’s Lord’s Media Centre and 2003’s Birmingham Selfridge’s at the Bullring Centre, the ultimate rejoinder to what was then Birmingham‘s reputation as a decaying concrete jungle.

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Spotlight: Jan Kaplický, Selfridges at the Birmingham Bullring Centre, 2003. Image © Flickr user Bs0u10e0 licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Selfridges at the Birmingham Bullring Centre, 2003. Image © Flickr user Bs0u10e0 licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0
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Enzo-Ferrarai Museum, Modena, 2012. Image via Studio cento29

Enzo-Ferrarai Museum, Modena, 2012. Image via Studio cento29

Where other practitioners of high-tech and futuristic architecture have been accused of moderating their radicalism as they became increasingly commercial, Kaplický built on the media attention these projects gave him to propose and build a series of buildings just as outlandish or seemingly impractical as ever, including the Museo Casa Enzo Ferrari in Modena. Sadly, his proposal for the Czech National Library in 2007 – his first major project in his own country – was viewed as a step too far, and met with fierce opposition from the public and political class. He died without seeing it commissioned.

Spotlight: Hans Hollein

Mobiles Büro, aufblasbares Bürogebäude, 1969 . Image © Gino Molin-Pradl
Mobiles Büro, aufblasbares Bürogebäude, 1969 . Image © Gino Molin-Pradl

Described by Richard Meier as an architect whose “groundbreaking ideas” have “had a major impact on the thinking of designers and architects,” Austrian artist, architect, designer, theoretician and Pritzker Prize laureate Hans Hollein worked in all aspects of design, from architecture to furniture, jewelry, glasses, lamps – even door handles. Known in particular for his museum designs, from the Abteiberg Museum in Mönchengladbach to the Museum of Modern Art in Frankfurt to Vienna’s Haas House, Hollein’s work manifests a unique, fascinating take on 1950s Modernism.

Büro + Fabriksgebäude, Tainan, Taiwan, 2005-2008. Image © Atelier Adam ChenVULCANIA Centre Européen du Volcanisme, Auvergne, Frankreich, 1994-2002. Image © Atelier Hans Hollein / Sina BaniahmadKerzengeschäft Marius Retti, Wien, Österreich, 1964–1965. Image © Franz HubmannHaas Haus, Geschäftshaus, Wien, Österreich, 1985-1990. Image © Atelier Hans Hollein / Sina Baniahmad+47

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Juweliergeschäft, Graben, Wien, Österreich 1972-1974. Image © Jerzy Survillo

Juweliergeschäft, Graben, Wien, Österreich 1972-1974. Image © Jerzy Survillo

Hollein, who was born in Vienna in 1934, was born into a family of mining engineers. Studying at the Vienna Academy of Fine Arts before heading to the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago and the University of California in Berkeley, Hollein dedicated himself to the works of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Frank Lloyd Wright, Richard Buckminster Fuller (whom he got to know personally) and became an advocate of Modernism. Throughout the 50s and 60s, he became known for his trailblazing theoretical writings and visionary architectural drawings, models, and collages. Hollein’s unbuilt competition entries – such as his designs for the Guggenheim Museum in Salzburg’s Mönchsberg – have particularly garnered interest.

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Bürohochhaus, Shenzhen, China, 2008-2016. Image © Hans Hollein & Partner ZT GesmbH

Bürohochhaus, Shenzhen, China, 2008-2016. Image © Hans Hollein & Partner ZT GesmbH

Bürohochhaus, Shenzhen, China, 2008-2016. Image © Hans HolleinHans Hollein, Zeichnung Drawing, 1960. Image © Hans HolleinHans Hollein, Zeichnung Drawing, 1960. Image © Hans HolleinHans Hollein, Skulptur Sculpture, 1960. Image © Hans Hollein+47

Hollein’s architectural office in Vienna was established in 1964, his first independent commission being the design of the Retti candle shop. In 1972, he represented Austria at the Venice Biennale with his installationWork and Behavior, Life and Death, Everyday Situations. He then continued to be Austria’s commissioner for the Venice Art Biennale from 1978 to 1990 and commissioner of the Biennale for Architecture in 1991, 1996, and 2000, as well as its director in 1996. The Haas House (1986 – 1990), situated diagonally opposite St. Stephen’s Cathedral in the centre of Austria’s capital, is perhaps Hollein’s best known and also most controversial buildings. Objections centred around placing such a contemporary structure in the city’s historical heart, yet it has become a significant landmark. Most recently, the two-hundred-meter-high SBF Tower is currently under construction in Shenzhen.

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Haas Haus, Geschäftshaus, Wien, Österreich, 1985-1990. Image © Atelier Hans Hollein / Sina Baniahmad

Haas Haus, Geschäftshaus, Wien, Österreich, 1985-1990. Image © Atelier Hans Hollein / Sina Baniahmad

Hollein sadly passed away in 2014 just after his 80th birthday after a long illness. See more of Hollein’s work on ArchDaily here.