14 Architects Selected as Recipients of 2017 AIA Young Architects Awards

14 Architects Selected as Recipients of 2017 AIA Young Architects Awards, Farmers Park / Hufft Projects. Image © Mike Sinclair
Farmers Park / Hufft Projects. Image © Mike Sinclair
 

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has selected 14 recipients for the 2017 AIA Young Architects Award. Now in its 24th year, the award was founded to honor young architects – licensed 10 years or fewer regardless of their age – who have “shown exceptional leadership and made significant contributions to the profession early in their careers.”

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Cherokee Studios; Los Angeles / Brooks + Scarpa. Image © Brooks + Scarpa

Cherokee Studios; Los Angeles / Brooks + Scarpa. Image © Brooks + Scarpa
 

2017 AIA Young Architects Award Recipients

Kara Bouillette, AIA / Hufft Projects

Shannon Christensen, AIA / CTA Architects Engineers

R. Corey Clayborne, AIA / Wiley|Wilson

Danielle C. Hermann, AIA / OPN Architects

Jeffrey Erwin Huber, AIA / Brooks + Scarpa Architects and Florida Atlantic University

Benjamin Kasdan, AIA / KTGY Architecture + Planning

Andrea Love, AIA / Payette

Kurt Neiswender, AIA / Sedgewick & Ferweda Architects

Jonathan Opitz, AIA / AMR Architects

Jeffrey  Pastva, AIA / JDAVIS

Jessica Sheridan, AIA / Mancini Duffy

Chris-Annmarie Spencer, AIA / Wheeler Kearns Architects

Lora Teagarden, AIA / RATIO Architects

Luis Velez-Alvarez, AIA / SmithGroupJJR

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Marwen’s Expansion / Wheeler Kearns Architects. Image © Steve Hall / Hedrich Blessing

Marwen’s Expansion / Wheeler Kearns Architects. Image © Steve Hall / Hedrich Blessing
 

Also announced were the winners of the 2017 AIA Associates Award, given to individual Associate AIA members to “recognize outstanding leaders and creative thinkers for significant contributions to their communities and the architecture profession.”  Associate membership is open to individuals who meet one of the following criteria: professional degree in architecture; currently work under the supervision of an architect; currently enrolled in the Architectural Experience Program (AXP) and working toward licensure; or faculty member in a university program in architecture.

2017 Associates Award recipients

Je’Nen M. Chastain, Assoc. AIA / Heller Manus Architects

Michael Friebele, Assoc. AIA / FTA Design Studio

Linsey Graff, Assoc. AIA / Ayers Saint Gross Architects

Mona Zellers, Assoc. AIA / LMN Architects

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Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN Architects. Image © LMN Architects

Vancouver Convention Centre West / LMN Architects. Image © LMN Architects
 

Young Architects and Associate Award winners will be presented with their awards in a ceremony at the AIA 2017 National Convention on Architecture in Orlando. Learn more about the Young Architects award here, and the Associate Award here.

News via AIA.

Jenny Sabin Studio Selected as Winner of the MoMA PS1 2017 Young Architects Program

Jenny Sabin Studio Selected as Winner of the MoMA PS1 2017 Young Architects Program , Jenny Sabin Studio. Lumen. 2017 (rendering). Winner of the Young Architects Program 2017, MoMA PS1, New York. Image Courtesy of Jenny Sabin Studio
Jenny Sabin Studio. Lumen. 2017 (rendering). Winner of the Young Architects Program 2017, MoMA PS1, New York. Image Courtesy of Jenny Sabin Studio

Lumen by Jenny Sabin Studio has been named the winner of The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s annual Young Architects Program. Opening on June 27 in the MoMA PS1 courtyard, this year’s construction is an immersive design that evolves over the course of a day, providing a cooling respite from the midday sun and a responsive glowing light after sundown. Drawn from among five finalists, Jenny Sabin Studio’s Lumen will serve as a temporary urban landscape for the 20th season of Warm Up, MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series. Lumen will remain on view through the summer.

Now in its 18th edition, the Young Architects Program at The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 has offered emerging architectural talent the opportunity to design and present innovative projects, challenging each year’s winners to develop creative designs for a temporary, outdoor installation that provides shade, seating, and water. The architects must also work within guidelines that address environmental issues, including sustainability and recycling.

Made of responsive tubular structures in a lightweight knitted fabric, Lumen features a canopy of recycled, photo-luminescent, and solar active textiles that absorb, collect, and deliver light. A misting system responds to visitors’ proximity, activating fabric stalactites that produce a refreshing micro-climate. Socially and environmentally responsive, Lumen’s multisensory environment is inspired by collective levity, play, and interaction as the structure and materials transform throughout the day and night, adapting to the densities of bodies, heat, and sunlight.

“The Young Architects Program remains one of the most significant opportunities for architects and designers from across the country and world to build radical yet transformative ideas. This year’s finalists are no exception; their projects illustrate a diversity of approaches and refreshing ideas for architecture today,” said Sean Anderson, Associate Curator in MoMA’s Department of Architecture and Design. “Jenny Sabin’s catalytic immersive environment, Lumen, captured the jury’s attention for imaginatively merging public and private spaces. With innovative construction and design processes borne from a critical merging of technology and nature to precise attention to detail at every scale, Lumen will no doubt engage visitors from day to night in a series of graduated environments and experiences.”

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Jenny Sabin Studio. Lumen. 2017 (rendering). Winner of the Young Architects Program 2017, MoMA PS1, New York. Image Courtesy of Jenny Sabin Studio

Jenny Sabin Studio. Lumen. 2017 (rendering). Winner of the Young Architects Program 2017, MoMA PS1, New York. Image Courtesy of Jenny Sabin Studio

Klaus Biesenbach, MoMA PS1 Director and MoMA Chief Curator at Large adds, “In its 18th iteration, this annual competition offered jointly by the Architecture and Design Department at MoMA and MoMA PS1 continues to take risks and encourage experimentation among architects. Jenny Sabin’s Lumen is a socially and environmentally responsive structure that spans practices and disciplines in its exploratory approach to new materials. Held in tension within the walls of MoMA PS1’s courtyard, Lumen turns visitors into participants who interact with its responsiveness to temperature, sunlight, and movement.”

The other finalists for this year’s MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program were Bureau Spectacular (Jimenez Lai and Joanna Grant), Ania Jaworska, Office of III (Sean Canty, Ryan Golenberg and Stephanie Lin), and SCHAUM/SHIEH (Rosalyne Shieh and Troy Schaum). An exhibition of the five finalists’ proposed projects will be on view at The Museum of Modern Art over the summer, organized by Sean Anderson, Associate Curator, with Arièle Dionne-Krosnick, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art.

Bloomberg Philanthropies has supported the Young Architects Program since 2007. In 2016, MoMA PS1 and The Museum of Modern Art were thrilled to announce that this lead sponsorship had been extended for three years, enabling the Young Architects Program to thrive and excite audiences through summer 2018.

About Jenny Sabin Studio

Jenny Sabin Studio is an architectural design firm that investigates the intersections of architecture and science, biology, and mathematics. The principal, Jenny E. Sabin, is the Arthur L. and Isabel B. Wiesenberger Assistant Professor in the area of Design and Emerging Technologies and the newly-appointed Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Architecture at Cornell University. She is also the Director of the Sabin Design Lab at Cornell AAP, a trans-disciplinary design research lab with specialization in computational design, data visualization, and digital fabrication. Sabin’s awards include the AIA Henry Adams first prize medal, the Arthur Spayd Brooke gold medal, a Pew Fellowship in the Arts, a USA Knight Fellowship in Architecture, the Architectural League Prize for Young Architects and a national IVY Innovator in design. Sabin has exhibited nationally and internationally including in the 9th ArchiLab at FRAC Centre, Orleans, France and Beauty, the 5th Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial in New York City. Upcoming exhibitions include Imprimer Le Monde at the Pompidou Centre, Paris, France.

Selection Process

To choose an architectural firm for the 2017 Young Architects Program, deans of architecture schools and the editors of architecture publications nominate around 50 firms comprised of recent architectural school graduates, junior faculty, and established architects experimenting with new styles or techniques. These finalists are asked to submit portfolios of their work for review by a panel including Glenn D. Lowry, Director of The Museum of Modern Art; Kathy Halbreich, Associate Director at The Museum of Modern Art; Klaus Biesenbach, Director of MoMA PS1 and Chief Curator at Large at the Museum of Modern Art; Peter Reed, Senior Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs, The Museum of Modern Art; Martino Stierli, Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture & Design at The Museum of Modern Art; Sean Anderson, Associate Curator of Architecture at The Museum of Modern Art.

Design Team

Project lead and manager: Dillon Pranger
Design & Representation: Jingyang Liu Leo, Diego Blanco, Mark Lien
Robotic Fabrication: Andrew Moorman and Andres Gutierrez
Virtual Reality: Christopher Morse
Content Coordination: Jordan Berta
Model Assistance: Jasmine Liu
Video: Cole Skaggs
Engineering Design: Clayton Binkley, Arup
Lighting Design: Jeffrey Nash
Knit Fabrication: Shima Seiki WHOLEGARMENT
Misting Systems: Mist Cooling Inc. with special thanks to Larry Geohring

History

This year marks the 20th summer that MoMA PS1 has hosted an architectural installation and music series in its outdoor space, though it is only the 18th year of the Young Architects Program, which began in 2000. The inaugural project was an architecturally based 1998 installation by the Austrian artist collective Gelatin. In 1999, Philip Johnson’s DJ Pavilion celebrated the historic affiliation of MoMA PS1 and MoMA. The previous winners of the Young Architects Program are SHoP/Sharples Holden Pasquarelli (2000), ROY (2001), William E. Massie (2002), Tom Wiscombe / EMERGENT (2003), nARCHITECTS (2004), Xefirotarch (2005), OBRA (2006), Ball-Nogues (2007), WORKac (2008), MOS (2009), Solid Objectives – Idenburg Liu (2010), Interboro Partners (2011), HWKN (2012), CODA (2013), The Living (2014),  Andrés Jaque / Office for Political Innovation (2015), and Escobedo Soliz Studio (2016).

Paul Revere Williams Wins 2017 AIA Gold Medal

Paul Revere Williams Wins 2017 AIA Gold Medal, LAX Theme Building, 1961. Image © Flickr user thomashawk. Licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0
LAX Theme Building, 1961. Image © Flickr user thomashawk. Licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has announced Paul Revere Williams, FAIA as the posthumous winner of the 2017 AIA Gold Medal. With a portfolio of nearly 3,000 buildings over five decades, Williams’ career was notable for breaking boundaries within the profession as the first black member of the AIA.

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Paul Revere Williams. Image Courtesy of AIA

Paul Revere Williams. Image Courtesy of AIA

“This is a moment in our Institute’s history that is so important to recognize and acknowledge the work of a champion,” said Phil Freelon, FAIA, Managing and Design Director at Perkins + Will, who presented to the AIA Board of Directors on behalf of Williams. “It’s been many decades but Paul Williams is finally being recognized for the brilliant work he did over many years.”

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La Concha Motel, Las Vegas, 1961 (now Neon Museum). Image Courtesy of AIA

La Concha Motel, Las Vegas, 1961 (now Neon Museum). Image Courtesy of AIA

A native of Los Angeles, Williams was known for his many schools, public buildings, and churches in a variety of styles, notably the Palm Springs Tennis Center (1946) and the space-age LAX Theme Building (1961). Eight of his buildings have been named to to the National Register of Historic Places.

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Guardian Angel Cathedral, Las Vegas, 1961. Image Courtesy of AIA

Guardian Angel Cathedral, Las Vegas, 1961. Image Courtesy of AIA

“Our profession desperately needs more architects like Paul Williams,” wrote William J. Bates, FAIA, in his support of William’s nomination for the AIA Gold Medal. “His pioneering career has encouraged others to cross a chasm of historic biases. I can’t think of another architect whose work embodies the spirit of the Gold Medal better. His recognition demonstrates a significant shift in the equity for the profession and the institute.”

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LAX Theme Building, 1961. Image Courtesy of AIA

LAX Theme Building, 1961. Image Courtesy of AIA

As the 73rd AIA Gold Medalist, Williams joins an esteemed list of winners including Frank Lloyd Wright (1949), Louis Sullivan (1944), Le Corbusier (1961), Louis I. Kahn (1971), I.M. Pei (1979), Thom Mayne (2013), Julia Morgan (2014), Moshe Safdie (2015). Last year, the prize was given to Denise Scott Brown & Robert Venturi, the first time the Gold Medal was given to a pair of architects.

Read more about Williams’ nomination here.

News via AIA.

3 Winners of the 2016 Young Talent Architecture Award Announced

3 Winners of the 2016 Young Talent Architecture Award Announced, Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

The Fundació Mies van der Rohe has announced the three winners of the inaugural Young Talent Architecture Award (YTAA) 2016. Established this year to “support the talent of recently graduated Architects, Urban Planners and Landscape Architects who will be responsible for transforming our environment in the future,”  9 finalists were selected from a shortlist of 30 projects, which was then narrowed down to 3 winners.

Winners

A symbiotic relation of cooperative social housing and dispersed tourism in Habana Vieja / Iwo Borkowicz, Faculty of Architecture, University of Leuven

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A symbiotic relation of cooperative social housing and dispersed tourism in Habana Vieja / Iwo Borkowicz, Faculty of Architecture, University of Leuven. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

The project proposes a simple and sustainable way to react to the dynamics of the demand of accommodation for tourists. The Jury appreciated the ‘glocal’ thinking which supports the local community in obtaining the tools to face the urban, economic and social changes that the city is undergoing.

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A symbiotic relation of cooperative social housing and dispersed tourism in Habana Vieja / Iwo Borkowicz, Faculty of Architecture, University of Leuven. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

S’lowtecture. Housing structure in Wroclaw-Zerniki / Tomasz Broma, Faculty of Architecture, Wroclaw University of Technology

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S'lowtecture. Housing structure in Wroclaw-Zerniki / Tomasz Broma, Faculty of Architecture, Wroclaw University of Technology. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

Housing is a key topic in Europe today and the project understands the impermanence of our habitat. The Jury considered the importance of understanding architecture as an open process in an ever-changing environment and the potential to create a real time experimental FabLab connected to an innovative housing experience.

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S'lowtecture. Housing structure in Wroclaw-Zerniki / Tomasz Broma, Faculty of Architecture, Wroclaw University of Technology. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

GeoFront. Strategic development plan for the frontier territories / Policarpo del Canto Baquera, Madrid School of Architecture, Polytechnic University of Madrid

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GeoFront. Strategic development plan for the frontier territories / Policarpo del Canto Baquera, Madrid School of Architecture, Polytechnic University of Madrid. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

The project addresses the topic of cohabitation and how borders (both political and geographical) can be transformed in order to make this cohabitation possible. This proposal approaches the role of design as a political tool, as a spatial practice within a new emergent socio-political space. The Jury was positively impressed by the amount of overlapping layers of complexity created and by the skillful designs and modeling to explain a newly imagined world.

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GeoFront. Strategic development plan for the frontier territories / Policarpo del Canto Baquera, Madrid School of Architecture, Polytechnic University of Madrid. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

Finalists

Death and Life of a Small French city, Alix Sportich du Réau de la Gaignonnière / Alice Villatte from School of architecture of Marne-la-Vallée, France

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Death and Life of a Small French city, Alix Sportich du Réau de la Gaignonnière / Alice Villatte from School of architecture of Marne-la-Vallée, France. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

Brewing Democracy: The Assembly of Le Balai Citoyen in Ouagadougou / Lorenzo Perri from AA, London, UK

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Brewing Democracy: The Assembly of Le Balai Citoyen in Ouagadougou / Lorenzo Perri from AA, London, UK. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

Genesis of a place towards the project / David Gonçalves Monteiro from FAUP, Porto, PT

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Genesis of a place towards the project / David Gonçalves Monteiro from FAUP, Porto, PT. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

Living in a cultural environment / Clàudia Carreras Oliver from ETSALS, Barcelona, ES

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Living in a cultural environment / Clàudia Carreras Oliver from ETSALS, Barcelona, ES. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

Living in offices. The alive triangle of Bordelongue in Toulouse / Jaufret Barrot, Cinthia Isabel Carrasco Fuentes from ENSA, Toulouse, FR

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Living in offices. The alive triangle of Bordelongue in Toulouse / Jaufret Barrot, Cinthia Isabel Carrasco Fuentes from ENSA, Toulouse, FR. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

Subversions Minhocao / Laura Abbruzzese from DA, Ferrara, IT

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Subversions Minhocao / Laura Abbruzzese from DA, Ferrara, IT. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

The YTAA 2016 Jury consisted of:

  • Jose Luis Vallejo, Architect, Principal at Ecosistema Urbano, Madrid (President)
  • Inge Beckel, Architect, Editor at Swiss-Architects.com, Zurich
  • Michał Duda, Architecture Historian, Curator at the Museum of Architecture, Wroclaw
  • Juulia Kauste, Sociologist, Director at the Museum of Finnish Architecture, Helsinki
  • Triin Ojari, Architect, Director at the Museum of Estonian Architecture, Tallinn

For more information on the award, check out the website, here.

News via Fundació Mies van der Rohe.

Spotlight: Benedetta Tagliabue

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Courtesy of RIBA

Courtesy of RIBA

Benedetta Tagliabue (born 24 June 1963) is an Italian architect known for designs which are sensitive to their context and yet still experimental in their approach to forms and materials. Her diverse and complex works have marked out her Barcelona-based firm EMBT as one of the most respected Spanish practices of the 21st century.

Santa Caterina Market. Image © Flickr user ligthelm licensed under CC BY 2.0Copagri Pavilion ‘Love IT’. Image © Marcela GrassiScottish Parliament Building. Image © Dave MorrisThe Spanish Pavilion at the 2010 Shanghai Expo.+9

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Spotlight: Benedetta Tagliabue, Santa Caterina Market. Image © Flickr user ligthelm licensed under CC BY 2.0

Santa Caterina Market. Image © Flickr user ligthelm licensed under CC BY 2.0
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Santa Caterina Market. Image © Ceramica Cumella

Santa Caterina Market. Image © Ceramica Cumella

Born in Milan, Tagliabue graduated from the Istituto Universitario di Architettura di Venezia in 1989. In the early 1990s, she married Spanish architect Enric Miralles and the pair founded their studio Miralles Tagliabue EMBT. Together, Miralles and Tagliabue designed some of the practice’s most notable works, including the renovation of the Santa Caterina Market in Barcelona and the enormous edifice of the Scottish Parliament Building – a building which critic Charles Jencks described as “a kind of small city,” reflecting the complexity and intricacy of the Edinburgh streets which it responds to.

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Scottish Parliament Building. Image © Dave Morris

Scottish Parliament Building. Image © Dave Morris

However, following Enric Miralles’ tragically premature death in 2000, Tagliabue took over the firm as a sole director, completing the Santa Caterina market, Edinburgh Parliament and a string of other projects besides. In recent years, the firm’s most striking work has perhaps been the Spanish Pavilion completed for the 2010 Shanghai Expo, a design which epitomizes their philosophy of continuing curiosity and material experimentation.

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Diagonal Mar Park. Image © Flickr user oh-barcelona licensed under CC BY 2.0

Diagonal Mar Park. Image © Flickr user oh-barcelona licensed under CC BY 2.0

To this day, Tagliabue refers to her late husband as one of her greatest influences, and in 2011 she founded the Foundation Enric Miralles, with the mission of promoting and teaching the philosophies of inquiry and experiment that are fundamental to his legacy.

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The Spanish Pavilion at the 2010 Shanghai Expo.

The Spanish Pavilion at the 2010 Shanghai Expo.

See all the works of EMBT featured on ArchDaily via the thumbnails below, and more coverage ofBenedetta Tagliabue below that:

Copagri Pavilion ‘Love IT’. Image © Marcela GrassiScottish Parliament Building. Image © Dave MorrisBarajas Social Housing Blocks. Image © Roland Halbe9 Flats low cost renovation in the Gothic Quarter of Barcelona. Image © Marcela Grassi+9

Interview with Benedetta Tagliabue: Looking at Buildings as if They Were Decomposing and Becoming New Sketches

Benedetta Tagliabue to Recieve 2013 RIBA Jencks Award

Benedetta Tagliabue Appointed as Newest Pritzker Prize Jury Member

Spotlight: Emilio Ambasz

© via azureazure.com
© via azureazure.com

As early as the 1970s, Emilio Ambasz (born 13 June 1943) initiated a discussion on sustainability through his work with green spaces and buildings which is arguably more important today than ever, and contributed to theoretical and design discourse outside of architecture through his wide variety of interest and career pursuits. Ambasz’s work has crossed several disciplines; he has been a curator, a professor, an industrial designer, and an architect, and is highly regarded in all of these varied pursuits.

Fukuoka Prefectural International Hall (1995). Image © Flickr user kentamabuchi licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0Cordoba House (1975). Image © Michele AlassioBanca dell’Occhio (2008). Image © Emilio AmbaszLucile Halsell Conservatory at the San Antonio Botanical Garden (1988). Image © Flickr user joevare licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0+9

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Fukuoka Prefectural International Hall (1995). Image © Flickr user kentamabuchi licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Fukuoka Prefectural International Hall (1995). Image © Flickr user kentamabuchi licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Born in Chaco, Argentina, Ambasz knew from an early age that he wanted to be an architect. According toa 2009 article in Architect Magazine, so great was his determination that at age 16 he worked for an architecture firm during the day while attending high school during the night. [1] Ambasz also had an appetite for education graduating from Princeton with a Bachelors degree and then a Master of Fine Arts in Architecture just a year later. His jump through the ranks of architectural academia led him to a brief career as a professor, but his work quickly brought the attention of scholars and professionals alike, and by age 25 Ambasz was working as the Curator of the Department of Architecture and Design for The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City.

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Banca dell’Occhio (2008). Image © Emilio Ambasz

Banca dell’Occhio (2008). Image © Emilio Ambasz

While at MoMA, Ambasz curated several critically acclaimed exhibitions, including “Italy: The New Domestic Landscape,” and “Universitas.” Curatorial duties provided Ambasz with an opportunity to investigate broad societal questions in a very public setting; in “Universitas,” Ambasz organized a collection of work which asked how universities should address nature from an educational perspective. Seemingly energized by the fields he was researching, Ambasz left MoMA in 1976 to establish himself as an industrial designer.

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Banca dell’Occhio (2008). Image © Emilio Ambasz

Banca dell’Occhio (2008). Image © Emilio Ambasz

As an independent designer, Ambasz had even greater success; the Vertebra chair, which he developed with Giancarlo Piretti, was one of the first office furniture to emphasize ergonomics over aesthetics. Ambasz’s architectural projects take a distinctive approach to design: within his works, nature must interact with the structure in a way he calls “green over the gray.” [2] In many of his projects, this idea manifests itself through green roofs and gardens built into the projects. His projects, such as the Cordoba House (1975) the Lucile Halsell Conservatory (1988), and the Fukuoka Prefectural International Hall (1994) combine nature with a sensitive response to clients’ needs and the architect’s desire to create compelling images. More recent works, such as the Banca dell’Occhio (2008) and Museum of Modern Art and Cinema (2010), continue this trend. By using this approach and executing it with ecologically friendly design elements, Ambasz demonstrated that sustainability could produce architecturally compelling buildings.

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Cordoba House (1975). Image © Michele Alassio

Cordoba House (1975). Image © Michele Alassio

Unifying the many occupations Ambasz has held during his life is a deep love of creativity. Ambasz offers poignant insight into his career in a quote to Architect Magazine:

“Many years ago, Alessandro Mendini, who at the time was the editor of Domus, asked me how I would define myself professionally. And I said I would define myself as an inventor. To me, architecture is an act of the imagination. Industrial design is an act of the imagination.” [1]

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Lucile Halsell Conservatory at the San Antonio Botanical Garden (1988). Image © Flickr user joevare licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

Lucile Halsell Conservatory at the San Antonio Botanical Garden (1988). Image © Flickr user joevare licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

See Emilio Ambasz’s works featured on ArchDaily via the thumbnails below:

MoMA Announces a Major Retrospective to Commemorate Frank Lloyd Wright’s 150th Birthday

Today, the Museum of Modern Art in New York announced a major retrospective of Frank Lloyd Wright’s work to be displayed in 2017, commemorating 150 years since the architect’s birth. Opening next June, the exhibition will feature approximately 450 works spanning Wright’s career including architectural drawings, models, building fragments, films, television broadcasts, print media, furniture, tableware, textiles, paintings, photographs, and scrapbooks, along with several works that have rarely or never been shown publicly.

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MoMA Announces a Major Retrospective to Commemorate Frank Lloyd Wright’s 150th Birthday, Plan for Greater Baghdad. Unbuilt project. 1957-58. 34 7/8 × 52″ (88.6 × 132.1 cm). Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Plan for Greater Baghdad. Unbuilt project. 1957-58. 34 7/8 × 52″ (88.6 × 132.1 cm). Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

The exhibition will be structured as an “anthology” of Wright’s work, separated into 12 sections dedicated to a key project or set of pieces from the Frank Lloyd Wright Archive, which was acquired in 2012 by MoMAin conjunction with the Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library at Columbia University. Models and drawings from works such as Unity Temple (1905–08), the Robie House (1908–10), Fallingwater (1934–37), the Johnson Wax Administration Building (1936–39), and Beth Sholom Synagogue (1953–59) will be on display, alongside investigations into lesser-known projects such as his proposed design for the Rosenwald School for African American children and Wright’s design for a model farm.

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Press conference unveiling The Mile-High Illinois (Chicago, Illinois). Unbuilt Project. 1956. Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Press conference unveiling The Mile-High Illinois (Chicago, Illinois). Unbuilt Project. 1956. Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

The exhibition will also cover Wright’s use of ornament, circular geometries and his Native American-inspired designs. Other considerations of the retrospective will be the intersection of nature, landscape, and architecture, and the contrast between the architect’s call for the democratization of the profession and his celebrity and media prowess.

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Rosenwald Foundation School (La Jolla, California). Unbuilt Project. 1928. Pencil and color pencil on tracing paper. 12 3/4 x 25 7/8” (32.4 x 65.7 cm). Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Rosenwald Foundation School (La Jolla, California). Unbuilt Project. 1928. Pencil and color pencil on tracing paper. 12 3/4 x 25 7/8” (32.4 x 65.7 cm). Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)
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Raul Bailleres House (Acapulco, Mexico). Unbuilt Project. 1952. Brown ink, pencil and color pencil on tracing paper. 31 3/4 x 52 7/8″ (80.6 x 134.3 cm). Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Raul Bailleres House (Acapulco, Mexico). Unbuilt Project. 1952. Brown ink, pencil and color pencil on tracing paper. 31 3/4 x 52 7/8″ (80.6 x 134.3 cm). Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

A recently restored model of one of Wright’s proposed towers designed to cluster around St. Mark’s Church-in-the-Bowery, deemed too radical for the tastes of the time, will conclude the exhibition. The final section will also include the model of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, a historical analysis of drawings, and a data-visualization project illustrating the architect’s global network of clients, professional relationships, and buildings.

The exhibition is scheduled to run from June 12 – October 1, 2017.

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Liberty Magazine Cover. 1926. Color pencil on paper. 24 1/2 x 28 1/4″ (62.2 x 71.8 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives. Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Liberty Magazine Cover. 1926. Color pencil on paper. 24 1/2 x 28 1/4″ (62.2 x 71.8 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives. Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)
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Model of St. Mark’s-in-the-Bouwerie. Unbuilt project. New York, New York. 1927-31. Painted wood. 53 x 16 x 16″ (134.6 x 40.6 x 40.6 cm). Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Model of St. Mark’s-in-the-Bouwerie. Unbuilt project. New York, New York. 1927-31. Painted wood. 53 x 16 x 16″ (134.6 x 40.6 x 40.6 cm). Image © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)