Powerhouse Wins Competition to Build New Urban Plaza in Eindhoven

Powerhouse Wins Competition to Build New Urban Plaza in Eindhoven, © Powerhouse Company
© Powerhouse Company
 

Powerhouse Company have won a competition to create a new mixed-use hub in Eindhoven, Netherlands. For the competition, Powerhouse teamed up with landscape architects ZUS and developerAmvest to design a trio of skyscrapers forming the winning proposal for a new urban plaza, called “District E”. The 70,000 square meter proposal will be located next to Eindhoven Station.

© Powerhouse Company© ZUS© Powerhouse Company© Powerhouse Company+5

The flexible construction and installation technology of District E anticipates the future growth of Eindhoven as a sustainable, innovative and economic hotspot. The seamless integration of architecture and landscape design guarantees a new public space filled with activity and a wide spectrum of green spaces – Powerhouse Company.

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© Powerhouse Company

© Powerhouse Company
 

Three tall towers collect in corresponding plinths, ranging from 76 to 158 meters in height. The towers will combine a residential program of approximately 450 homes, 20 percent of which will be social housing. A mixture of public amenities will be added, ranging from a hotel, shops/restaurants, a student study center and exhibition spaces. District E’s new “city plaza” aims to balance the 17th-century buildings from the old Eindhoven center alongside the large-scale 20th-century projects near the railway.

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© Powerhouse Company

© Powerhouse Company
 

Powerhouse described the use of the plinths as a tool for the skyscrapers to be set back, ensuring that “Eindhoven station, a national monument, is honored by giving it space and relating to its scale.” A diagonal axis within the new urban plaza is another key element to the design, as described byPowerhouse:

An essential and defining gesture in the design is the diagonal axis that visually connects the station and the ‘Philipstoren’, a monument and symbol of Eindhoven’s industrial and technological heritage. This axis cuts through the ensemble and in-so-doing linking the station’s square, the new city plaza and the ’18 September’ square like a set of beads on a thread – Powerhouse Company.

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© ZUS

© ZUS
 
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© Powerhouse Company

© Powerhouse Company
 

With offices in Rotterdam, Beijing, and Munich, the architecture office has a portfolio of mixed-use projects including inSports Beijing to the Maastricht Pathé theater. The firm also beat out a bevy of heavyweight contenders in 2014 with their competition-winning proposal of a 100m observation tower in Çanakkale, Turkey.

News via: Powerhouse.

RIBA Announces 2017 National Award Winners

RIBA Announces 2017 National Award Winners, Courtesy of RIBA
Courtesy of RIBA

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has announced 49 exemplary projects as winners of the 2017 RIBA National Awards. This year’s list features projects from a wide range of typologies and leading architecture firms including Herzog & de Meuron, Foster + PartnersWilkinsonEyre, and Caruso St John Architects.

Command of the Oceans / Baynes and Mitchell Architects © Hélène BinetTate Modern's Blavatnik Building (Switch House) / Herzog & de Meuron © Iwan BaanSouth Street / Sandy Rendel Architects Ltd. © Richard ChiversSt Albans Abbey / Richard Griffiths Architects © Richard Griffiths+50

“Congratulations to the clients and their design teams for the extraordinary talent, ambition and enthusiasm that has led to this year’s roll-call of phenomenal buildings,” said RIBA President Jane Duncan at today’s announcement. “RIBA National Awards provide insight into emerging design trends, as well as showing how well the profession responds to economic drivers. I am delighted to see such confident, innovative and ambitious architecture delivered in such challenging times.

Particular trends called out by Duncan include projects aimed at tackling the country’s shortage of quality housing developments, the innovative use of architecture to enhance excitement and pleasure in the built environment and the continued preference for brick among the UK’s top architects. One negative trend identified by Duncan was the lack of publicly-funded education projects.

“I am pleased to award a selection of high-quality new school buildings such as The Laboratory, Dulwich College and new music facilities at Wells Cathedral School, that will benefit generations of children and teachers. However, after a few boom years, which saw a clutch of award winning, cost effective state school buildings, it’s disappointing that there are none on this year’s list. Well-designed schools support improved student achievement, and staff and student wellbeing and should be part of educational aspirations for all our schools, not just those in the fee-paying sector.”

Selected from the winners of 12 regional awards programs, the national list will now make up the pool of projects competing for the RIBA Stirling Prize for the UK’s best building of the year.

The full list of winners includes:

Carrowbreck Meadow / Hamson Barron Smith
Norwich, Norfolk, England

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Carrowbreck Meadow / Hamson Barron Smith © Jefferson Smith

Carrowbreck Meadow / Hamson Barron Smith © Jefferson Smith

The Enterprise Centre, University of East Anglia / Architype
Norwich, Norfolk, England

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The Enterprise Centre, University of East Anglia / Architype © Nick Caville

The Enterprise Centre, University of East Anglia / Architype © Nick Caville

Peacock House / BHSF Architekten with Studio-P
Aldeburgh, Suffolk, England

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Peacock House / BHSF Architekten with Studio-P © Benedikt Redmann

Peacock House / BHSF Architekten with Studio-P © Benedikt Redmann

St Albans Abbey / Richard Griffiths Architects
St Albans, Hertfordshire, England

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St Albans Abbey / Richard Griffiths Architects © Richard Griffiths

St Albans Abbey / Richard Griffiths Architects © Richard Griffiths

Vajrasana Buddhist Retreat Centre / Walters & Cohen Architects
Walsham le Willows, Suffolk, England

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Vajrasana Buddhist Retreat Centre / Walters & Cohen Architects © Will Scott

Vajrasana Buddhist Retreat Centre / Walters & Cohen Architects © Will Scott

The Welding Institute / Eric Parry Architects
Great Abington, Cambridge, England

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The Welding Institute / Eric Parry Architects © Dirk Lindner

The Welding Institute / Eric Parry Architects © Dirk Lindner

Leicester Cathedral’s Richard III Project ‘With Dignity and Honour’ / van Heyningen and Haward Architects
Leicester, England

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Leicester Cathedral's Richard III Project 'With Dignity and Honour' / van Heyningen and Haward Architects © Carlo Draisci

Leicester Cathedral’s Richard III Project ‘With Dignity and Honour’ / van Heyningen and Haward Architects © Carlo Draisci

The Laboratory, Dulwich College / Grimshaw
Dulwich, south London, England

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The Laboratory, Dulwich College / Grimshaw © Daniel Shearing

The Laboratory, Dulwich College / Grimshaw © Daniel Shearing

No 49 / 31/44 Architects
Hither Green, southeast London, England

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No 49 / 31/44 Architects © Anna Stathaki

No 49 / 31/44 Architects © Anna Stathaki

The Loom / Duggan Morris Architects
Whitechapel, east London, England

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The Loom / Duggan Morris Architects © Jack Hobhouse

The Loom / Duggan Morris Architects © Jack Hobhouse

8 Finsbury Circus / WilkinsonEyre
City of London

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8 Finsbury Circus / WilkinsonEyre © Dirk Lindner

8 Finsbury Circus / WilkinsonEyre © Dirk Lindner

40 Chancery Lane / Bennetts Associates
Holborn, central London, England

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40 Chancery Lane / Bennetts Associates © Allan Crow

40 Chancery Lane / Bennetts Associates © Allan Crow

King’s College School / Allies and Morrison
Wimbledon, southwest London, England

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King's College School / Allies and Morrison © Nick Guttridge

King’s College School / Allies and Morrison © Nick Guttridge

New Scotland Yard / Allford Hall Monaghan Morris
Embankment, central London, England

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New Scotland Yard / Allford Hall Monaghan Morris © Timothy Soar

New Scotland Yard / Allford Hall Monaghan Morris © Timothy Soar

Paradise Gardens / Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands
Hammersmith, west London, England

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Paradise Gardens / Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands © Paul Riddle

Paradise Gardens / Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands © Paul Riddle

Photography Studio for Juergen Teller / 6a architects
Ladbroke Grove, west London, England

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Photography Studio for Juergen Teller / 6a architects © Johan Dehlin

Photography Studio for Juergen Teller / 6a architects © Johan Dehlin

Silchester / Haworth Tompkins
Notting Hill, west London, England

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Silchester / Haworth Tompkins © Philip Vile

Silchester / Haworth Tompkins © Philip Vile

Barretts Grove / Amin Taha + Groupwork
Stoke Newington, north London, England

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Barretts Grove / Amin Taha + Groupwork © Timothy Soar

Barretts Grove / Amin Taha + Groupwork © Timothy Soar

Dujardin Mews / Karakusevic Carson Architects with Maccreanor Lavington
Ponders End, north London, England

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Dujardin Mews / Karakusevic Carson Architects with Maccreanor Lavington © Mark Hadden

Dujardin Mews / Karakusevic Carson Architects with Maccreanor Lavington © Mark Hadden

Tate Modern’s Blavatnik Building (Switch House) / Herzog & de Meuron
Bankside, central London, England

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Tate Modern's Blavatnik Building (Switch House) / Herzog & de Meuron © Iwan Baan

Tate Modern’s Blavatnik Building (Switch House) / Herzog & de Meuron © Iwan Baan

The British Museum World Conservation and Exhibitions Centre / Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners
Bloomsbury, central London, England

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The British Museum World Conservation and Exhibitions Centre / Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners © Joas Souza

The British Museum World Conservation and Exhibitions Centre / Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners © Joas Souza

Walmer Yard / P Salter and Associates with Mole Architects John Comparelli Architects
Holland Park, west London, England

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Walmer Yard / P Salter and Associates with Mole Architects John Comparelli Architects © Hélène Binet

Walmer Yard / P Salter and Associates with Mole Architects John Comparelli Architects © Hélène Binet

Live Works / Flanagan Lawrence with Tench Maddison Ash Architects
Newcastle Upon Tyne, England

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Live Works / Flanagan Lawrence with Tench Maddison Ash Architects © Jill Tate

Live Works / Flanagan Lawrence with Tench Maddison Ash Architects © Jill Tate

Shawm House / MawsonKerr Architects
West Woodburn, Northumberland, England

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Shawm House / MawsonKerr Architects © Rob Rhodes

Shawm House / MawsonKerr Architects © Rob Rhodes

The Word / FaulknerBrowns Architects
South Shields, South Tyneside, England

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The Word / FaulknerBrowns Architects © Al Crow

The Word / FaulknerBrowns Architects © Al Crow

Chetham’s School of Music – Stoller Hall / stephenson STUDIO
Northern Quarter, Manchester, England

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Chetham's School of Music - Stoller Hall / stephenson STUDIO © Daniel Hopkinson

Chetham’s School of Music – Stoller Hall / stephenson STUDIO © Daniel Hopkinson

Finlays Warehouse / stephenson STUDIO
Northern Quarter, Manchester, England

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Finlays Warehouse / stephenson STUDIO © Andrew Wall

Finlays Warehouse / stephenson STUDIO © Andrew Wall

Liverpool Philharmonic / Caruso St John Architects
Liverpool, England

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Liverpool Philharmonic / Caruso St John Architects © Hélène Binet

Liverpool Philharmonic / Caruso St John Architects © Hélène Binet

Maggie’s at the Robert Parfett Building / Foster + Partners
Christie Hospital, south Manchester, England

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Maggie's at the Robert Parfett Building / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young

Maggie’s at the Robert Parfett Building / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young

Fallahogey Studio / McGarry-Moon Architects Ltd
Kilrea, Northern Ireland

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Fallahogey Studio / McGarry-Moon Architects Ltd © Adam Currie

Fallahogey Studio / McGarry-Moon Architects Ltd © Adam Currie

Bedales School of Art and Design Building / Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios
Petersfield, Hampshire, England

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Bedales School of Art and Design Building / Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios © Hufton + Crow

Bedales School of Art and Design Building / Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios © Hufton + Crow

The Berrow Foundation Building and New Garden Building, Lincoln College / Stanton Williams
University of Oxford, Oxford, England

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The Berrow Foundation Building and New Garden Building, Lincoln College / Stanton Williams © Nick Hufton

The Berrow Foundation Building and New Garden Building, Lincoln College / Stanton Williams © Nick Hufton

Magdalen College Library / Wright & Wright Architects
University of Oxford, Oxford, England

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Magdalen College Library / Wright & Wright Architects © Dennis Gilbert

Magdalen College Library / Wright & Wright Architects © Dennis Gilbert

Warwick Hall Community Centre / Acanthus Clews Architects
Burford, Oxfordshire, England

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Warwick Hall Community Centre / Acanthus Clews Architects © Andy Marshall

Warwick Hall Community Centre / Acanthus Clews Architects © Andy Marshall

Caring Wood / Macdonald Wright Architects Rural Office for Architecture
near Maidstone, Kent, England

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Caring Wood / Macdonald Wright Architects Rural Office for Architecture © James Morris

Caring Wood / Macdonald Wright Architects Rural Office for Architecture © James Morris

Command of the Oceans / Baynes and Mitchell Architects
Chatham Historic Dockyard, Kent, England

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Command of the Oceans / Baynes and Mitchell Architects © Hélène Binet

Command of the Oceans / Baynes and Mitchell Architects © Hélène Binet

Hastings Pier / dRMM Architects
Hastings, East Sussex, England

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Hastings Pier / dRMM Architects © Alex de Rijke

Hastings Pier / dRMM Architects © Alex de Rijke

British Airways i360 / Marks Barfield Architects
Brighton & Hove, England

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British Airways i360 / Marks Barfield Architects © Visual Air

British Airways i360 / Marks Barfield Architects © Visual Air

South Street / Sandy Rendel Architects Ltd.
Lewes, East Sussex, England

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South Street / Sandy Rendel Architects Ltd. © Richard Chivers

South Street / Sandy Rendel Architects Ltd. © Richard Chivers

Dyson Campus Expansion / WilkinsonEyre
Malmesbury, Wiltshire., England

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Dyson Campus Expansion / WilkinsonEyre © Limited

Dyson Campus Expansion / WilkinsonEyre © Limited

New Music Facilities for Wells Cathedral School / Eric Parry Architects
Wells, Somerset, England

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New Music Facilities for Wells Cathedral School / Eric Parry Architects © Dirk Lindner

New Music Facilities for Wells Cathedral School / Eric Parry Architects © Dirk Lindner

Wolfson Tree Management Centre / Invisible Studio
Westonbirt Arboretum, Gloucestershire, England

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Wolfson Tree Management Centre / Invisible Studio © Andy Marshall

Wolfson Tree Management Centre / Invisible Studio © Andy Marshall

Remembrance Centre, National Memorial Arboretum / Glenn Howells Architects
Lichfield, Staffordshire

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Remembrance Centre, National Memorial Arboretum / Glenn Howells Architects © Rob Parrish

Remembrance Centre, National Memorial Arboretum / Glenn Howells Architects © Rob Parrish

Blackburn Meadows Biomass / BDP
Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England

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Blackburn Meadows Biomass / BDP © Paul Karalius

Blackburn Meadows Biomass / BDP © Paul Karalius

Derwenthorpe Phase One / Studio Partington
York, north Yorkshire, England

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Derwenthorpe Phase One / Studio Partington © Tim Crocker

Derwenthorpe Phase One / Studio Partington © Tim Crocker

Victoria Gate Arcades / ACME
Leeds city centre, England

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Victoria Gate Arcades / ACME © Jack Hobhouse

Victoria Gate Arcades / ACME © Jack Hobhouse

City of Glasgow College / Reiach and Hall Architects and Michael Laird Architects
Cathedral Street, Glasgow, Scotland

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City of Glasgow College / Reiach and Hall Architects and Michael Laird Architects © Keith Hunter

City of Glasgow College / Reiach and Hall Architects and Michael Laird Architects © Keith Hunter

Newhouse of Auchengee / Ann Nisbet Studio
Meikle Auchengree, North Ayrshire, Scotland

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Newhouse of Auchengee / Ann Nisbet Studio © Susan Castillo

Newhouse of Auchengee / Ann Nisbet Studio © Susan Castillo

Rockvilla / Hoskins Architects
Speirs Wharf, Glasgow, Scotland

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Rockvilla / Hoskins Architects © Dapple Photography

Rockvilla / Hoskins Architects © Dapple Photography

Learn more about RIBA’s annual awards program, here.

News via the Royal Institute of British Architecture.

Foster + Partners Reveal Updated Designs for Intermodal Transportation Hub in Spain

Foster + Partners Reveal Updated Designs for Intermodal Transportation Hub in Spain, © Foster + Partners
© Foster + Partners

Foster + Partners and Juan Cabanelas have unveiled updated designs for the refurbishment and extension of the Ourense FFCC Station in Galicia, Spain. The firm was originally selected as the winners of an international competition for the design in 2011 with an expansive new structure spanning the tracks. The new scheme will instead utilize the existing station building, expanding with a series of columned canopies arranged to create a new urban square and easily-accessible multi-modal hub.

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© Foster + Partners

© Foster + Partners

The integrated design will join the high-speed rail and nearby bus station (also currently under design) into one single urban intervention, as well as create pedestrian connections between the neighborhoods on either side of the tracks through an elevated walkway and new public park. The station will accommodate the increase in passengers generated by ongoing upgrades to the region’s high-speed rail lines, offering cafes and shops that will cater to travellers and locals alike.

The modular canopy system will be made up of concrete plates on slender columns, designed to provide shelter from the city’s high-temperature, high-precipitation climate and to allow for ease of future growth. The color of the concrete will be matched to the granite found in the existing station, creating harmony between the new and the old. In front of the building, a new water feature inspired byOurense’s famous hot water springs will welcome passengers into the city.

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© Foster + Partners

© Foster + Partners

Inside, the main lobby has been transformed into a triple-height space that will provide an abundance of natural light and historic frescos on the upper walls will be restored. Circulation through the station has been simplified to provide a more intuitive route for passengers, with clear sightlines connecting the check-in area with the platforms. An internal link will provide a direct connection to the bus station to the west, providing an easy path between transportation systems.

News via Foster + Partners.

Prix Versailles Celebrates 12 Projects for Their Outstanding Commercial Architecture

Prix Versailles Celebrates 12 Projects for Their Outstanding Commercial Architecture , Courtesy of Prix Versailles
Courtesy of Prix Versailles

The international Prix Versailles Committee has announced the recipients of its annual awards celebrating built commercial architecture. The awards were held at the UNESCO World Headquarters, with recipients hailing from 6 regions around the world. Chaired by the Mayor of Versailles François de Mazières, the international jury included architects Manuelle Gautrand, Toyo Ito, Wang Shu, and acclaimed chef Guy Laroche.

The 12 World Titles are awarded in 4 top categories: stores, shopping malls, hotels and restaurants. The winners were selected from a diverse range of 70 regional winners already present in the ceremony.

Check out the gallery of the 12 winners below:

Chanel (Temporary Store); Amsterdam, Netherlands / MVRDV. Image © MVRDVTokyu Plaza Ginza; Tokyo, Japan / Nikken Sekkei. Image © Koji Fujii, Nacasa & Partners Inc.Lideta Mercato; Addis Ababa, Ethiopia / Vilalta Arquitectura. Image © VILALTAMar Adentro; San José del Cabo, Mexico / Miguel Ángel Aragonés. Image © Joe Fletcher+118

Shops and Stores

Prix Versailles 2017: Dior; Miami, U.S.A.

Architects: BarbaritoBancel Architects 

Special Prize Interior: Hangzhou Zhongshuge; Hangzhou, China

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Dior; Miami, U.S.A. / BarbaritoBancel Architects. Image © Alessandra Chemollo

Dior; Miami, U.S.A. / BarbaritoBancel Architects. Image © Alessandra Chemollo

Dior; Miami, U.S.A. / BarbaritoBancel Architects. Image © Alessandra ChemolloDior Miami / MVRDV. Image © Alessandra ChemolloDior; Miami, U.S.A. / BarbaritoBancel Architects. Image © Alessandra ChemolloDior; Miami, U.S.A. / BarbaritoBancel Architects. Image © Alessandra Chemollo+118

Architects: X+Living

Special Prize Exterior: Chanel (Temporary Store); Amsterdam, Netherlands

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Hangzhou Zhongshuge; Hangzhou, China / X+Living. Image © Shao Feng

Hangzhou Zhongshuge; Hangzhou, China / X+Living. Image © Shao Feng

Hangzhou Zhongshuge; Hangzhou, China / X+Living. Image © Shao FengHangzhou Zhongshuge; Hangzhou, China / X+Living. Image © Shao FengHangzhou Zhongshuge; Hangzhou, China / X+Living. Image © Shao FengHangzhou Zhongshuge; Hangzhou, China / X+Living. Image © Shao Feng+118

Architects: MVRDV

Shopping Malls

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Chanel (Temporary Store); Amsterdam, Netherlands / MVRDV. Image © MVRDV

Chanel (Temporary Store); Amsterdam, Netherlands / MVRDV. Image © MVRDV

Chanel (Temporary Store); Amsterdam, Netherlands / MVRDV. Image © MVRDVChanel (Temporary Store); Amsterdam, Netherlands / MVRDV. Image © MVRDVChanel (Temporary Store); Amsterdam, Netherlands / MVRDV. Image © MVRDVChanel (Temporary Store); Amsterdam, Netherlands / MVRDV. Image © MVRDV+118

Prix Versailles 2017Tokyu Plaza Ginza; Tokyo, Japan

Architects: Nikken Sekkei

Special Prize Interior: ARG Shopping Mall; Tehran, Iran

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Tokyu Plaza Ginza; Tokyo, Japan / Nikken Sekkei. Image © Koji Fujii, Nacasa & Partners Inc.

Tokyu Plaza Ginza; Tokyo, Japan / Nikken Sekkei. Image © Koji Fujii, Nacasa & Partners Inc.

Tokyu Plaza Ginza; Tokyo, Japan / Nikken Sekkei. Image © Koji Fujii, Nacasa & Partners Inc.Tokyu Plaza Ginza; Tokyo, Japan / Nikken Sekkei. Image © Koji Fujii, Nacasa & Partners Inc.Tokyu Plaza Ginza; Tokyo, Japan / Nikken Sekkei. Image © Koji Fujii, Nacasa & Partners Inc.Tokyu Plaza Ginza; Tokyo, Japan / Nikken Sekkei. Image © Koji Fujii, Nacasa & Partners Inc.+118

Architects: arsh4d studio

Special Prize Exterior: Lideta Mercato; Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

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ARG Shopping Mall; Tehran, Iran / arsh4d studio. Image © Ali Daghigh, Parham Taghiof

ARG Shopping Mall; Tehran, Iran / arsh4d studio. Image © Ali Daghigh, Parham Taghiof

ARG Shopping Mall; Tehran, Iran / arsh4d studio. Image © Ali Daghigh, Parham TaghiofARG Shopping Mall; Tehran, Iran / arsh4d studio. Image © Ali Daghigh, Parham TaghiofARG Shopping Mall; Tehran, Iran / arsh4d studio. Image © Ali Daghigh, Parham TaghiofARG Shopping Mall; Tehran, Iran / arsh4d studio. Image © Ali Daghigh, Parham Taghiof+118

Architects: Vilalta Arquitectura

Hotels

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Lideta Mercato; Addis Ababa, Ethiopia / Vilalta Arquitectura. Image © VILALTA

Lideta Mercato; Addis Ababa, Ethiopia / Vilalta Arquitectura. Image © VILALTA

Lideta Mercato; Addis Ababa, Ethiopia / Vilalta Arquitectura. Image © VILALTALideta Mercato; Addis Ababa, Ethiopia / Vilalta Arquitectura. Image © VILALTALideta Mercato; Addis Ababa, Ethiopia / Vilalta Arquitectura. Image © VILALTALideta Mercato; Addis Ababa, Ethiopia / Vilalta Arquitectura. Image © VILALTA+118

Prix Versailles 2017Chablé – Yucatan Peninsula; Chocholá, Mexico

Architects: Jorge Borja, Paulina Morán

Special Prize Interior: Spedition; Thun, Switzerland

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Chablé - Yucatan Peninsula; Chocholá, Mexico / Jorge Borja, Paulina Morán. Image © Chablé Resort & Spa

Chablé – Yucatan Peninsula; Chocholá, Mexico / Jorge Borja, Paulina Morán. Image © Chablé Resort & Spa

Chablé - Yucatan Peninsula; Chocholá, Mexico / Jorge Borja, Paulina Morán. Image © Chablé Resort & SpaChablé - Yucatan Peninsula; Chocholá, Mexico / Jorge Borja, Paulina Morán. Image © Chablé Resort & SpaChablé - Yucatan Peninsula; Chocholá, Mexico / Jorge Borja, Paulina Morán. Image © Chablé Resort & SpaChablé - Yucatan Peninsula; Chocholá, Mexico / Jorge Borja, Paulina Morán. Image © Chablé Resort & Spa+118

Architects: Stylt Trampoli

Special Prize Exterior: Mar Adentro; San José del Cabo, Mexico

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Spedition; Thun, Switzerland / Stylt Trampoli. Image © Stylt

Spedition; Thun, Switzerland / Stylt Trampoli. Image © Stylt

Spedition; Thun, Switzerland / Stylt Trampoli. Image © StyltSpedition; Thun, Switzerland / Stylt Trampoli. Image © StyltSpedition; Thun, Switzerland / Stylt Trampoli. Image © StyltSpedition; Thun, Switzerland / Stylt Trampoli. Image © Stylt+118

Architects: Miguel Ángel Aragonés

Restaurants

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Mar Adentro; San José del Cabo, Mexico / Miguel Ángel Aragonés. Image © Joe Fletcher

Mar Adentro; San José del Cabo, Mexico / Miguel Ángel Aragonés. Image © Joe Fletcher

Mar Adentro; San José del Cabo, Mexico / Miguel Ángel Aragonés. Image © Joe FletcherMar Adentro; San José del Cabo, Mexico / Miguel Ángel Aragonés. Image © Joe FletcherMar Adentro; San José del Cabo, Mexico / Miguel Ángel Aragonés. Image © Joe FletcherMar Adentro; San José del Cabo, Mexico / Miguel Ángel Aragonés. Image © Joe Fletcher+118

Prix Versailles 2017Illusion; Doha, Qatar

Architects: Rockwell Group 

Special Prize Interior: Shukufuku Japanese Bento; Melbourne, Australia

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Illusion; Doha, Qatar / Rockwell Group. Image © Rockwell Group

Illusion; Doha, Qatar / Rockwell Group. Image © Rockwell Group

Illusion; Doha, Qatar / Rockwell Group. Image © Rockwell GroupIllusion; Doha, Qatar / Rockwell Group. Image © Rockwell GroupIllusion; Doha, Qatar / Rockwell Group. Image © Rockwell GroupIllusion; Doha, Qatar / Rockwell Group. Image © Rockwell Group+118

Architects: Rptecture Architects 

Special Prize Exterior: The Dancing Pavilion; Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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Shukufuku Japanese Bento; Melbourne, Australia / Rptecture Architects. Image © Rptecture Architects

Shukufuku Japanese Bento; Melbourne, Australia / Rptecture Architects. Image © Rptecture Architects

Shukufuku Japanese Bento; Melbourne, Australia / Rptecture Architects. Image © Rptecture ArchitectsShukufuku Japanese Bento; Melbourne, Australia / Rptecture Architects. Image © Rptecture ArchitectsShukufuku Japanese Bento; Melbourne, Australia / Rptecture Architects. Image © Rptecture ArchitectsShukufuku Japanese Bento; Melbourne, Australia / Rptecture Architects. Image © Rptecture Architects+118

Architects: Estudio Guto Requena

News via: Prix Versailles.

Legendary Rugby Players Help HOK Design the Stadium of Tomorrow

Legendary Rugby Players Help HOK Design the Stadium of Tomorrow , The design of the perfect rugby stadium was a collaboration between HOK and four rugby legends. Image Courtesy of HOK
The design of the perfect rugby stadium was a collaboration between HOK and four rugby legends. Image Courtesy of HOK
 

Few architectural typologies are more centered around the human experience than a sporting arena. The design of sports stadiums often feature notable architecture firms, such as Herzog & de Meuron’s design for Chelsea’s football stadium in London, and Kengo Kuma’s 2020 Olympic Stadium in Tokyo. Recently, renowned design practice HOK tackled stadium design using an obvious yet untapped resource in the design of rugby stadiums –rugby players themselves.

John Rhodes, a director of HOK’s Sports + Recreation + Entertainment practice, met with legendary rugby players Jamie Roberts (Wales), Tim Visser (Scotland), James Horwill (Australia) and Danny Care (England) to capture their ideas, both as players and fans. The findings were collated into a video by HOK, which you can watch below.

The design of the perfect rugby stadium was a collaboration between HOK and four rugby legends. Image Courtesy of HOKFiber optic pitches could display real time information to fans. Image Courtesy of HOKGPS connectivity could stream player statistics to fans. Image Courtesy of HOKThe design of the perfect rugby stadium was a collaboration between HOK and four rugby legends. Image Courtesy of HOK+14

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The design of the perfect rugby stadium was a collaboration between HOK and four rugby legends. Image Courtesy of HOK

The design of the perfect rugby stadium was a collaboration between HOK and four rugby legends. Image Courtesy of HOK
 

The rugby legends placed heavy influence on the connection between players and fans, highlighting how city center stadiums create the pre-match drama of players driving through bustling streets. Furthermore, the decreased area of city stadiums is mitigated by steeper viewing stands, creating a more intimate connection between fans and players. As a throwback to the rugby stadiums of the 1960s, the players proposed an enlarged standing area in the action-fueled ‘red zone’ between the 22m line and touch line, generating further density and noise from excited fans.

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The project was headed by John Rhodes of HOK. Image Courtesy of HOK

The project was headed by John Rhodes of HOK. Image Courtesy of HOK
 
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GPS connectivity could stream player statistics to fans. Image Courtesy of HOK

GPS connectivity could stream player statistics to fans. Image Courtesy of HOK
 

Connectivity and modern technology were also at the forefront of the legends’ minds. A fiber optics playing field could display real-time information to fans during intervals, whilst player-tracking GPS currently used for team statistics could be made available to fans, measuring everything from distance run to force of collisions. More radically, a movable overhead gantry could follow the action, projecting a laser to mark the game line whilst providing an incredible aerial view for lucky spectators.

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Fiber optic pitches could display real time information to fans. Image Courtesy of HOK

Fiber optic pitches could display real time information to fans. Image Courtesy of HOK
 
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An overhead gantry could follow the game line, providing an aerial view for spectators. Image Courtesy of HOK

An overhead gantry could follow the game line, providing an aerial view for spectators. Image Courtesy of HOK
 

Any modern, iconic sports ground must provide an exceptional experience for fans. The unique passion of fans is fundamental to the sport and, as architects, we need to design stadiums that maximize this energy…The players gave us exceptional insight into what affects elite athletes. As avid fans, they also provided an invaluable perspective. This has improved our understanding of how to design the best stadiums for both rugby fans and players – John Rhodes, Director ofHOK Sports, Recreation + Energy.

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GPS connectivity could stream player statistics to fans. Image Courtesy of HOK

GPS connectivity could stream player statistics to fans. Image Courtesy of HOK
 
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Standing areas in the 'red zone' could generate more density and noise from excited fans. Image Courtesy of HOK

Standing areas in the ‘red zone’ could generate more density and noise from excited fans. Image Courtesy of HOK
 

News via: HOK.

8 Ways We Can Improve the Design of Our Streets for Protest

8 Ways We Can Improve the Design of Our Streets for Protest, © Gina Ford and Martin Zogran
© Gina Ford and Martin Zogran

Once largely viewed as a fringe activity belonging to passionate extremists, protest is now—in the wake of a controversial new administration’s ascension to power in the US and a heightened interest in politics globally—a commonplace occurrence, with a much broader participant base in need of places to gather and move en masse. This revitalized interest in protest was perhaps most visible on one particularly historic occasion: on January 21st, 2017, a record-breaking 4.2 million people took to the streets across the US to exercise their first-amendment rights.

Women’s marches took place on the frozen tundra (we have photographic evidence from a scientist in the Arctic Circle) and even in a Los Angeles cancer ward. But for the most part, these protests happened in the streets. In the first few months of 2017, the streets of our cities suddenly took center stage on screens across the world. From Washington to Seattle, Sydney to San Antonio, Paris to Fairbanks, broad boulevards and small town main streets were transformed from spaces for movement to places of resistance. From the Women’s March on Washington to April’s People’s Climate March, protestors are looking for space to convene and advocate for the issues that matter most to them.

In a thriving democracy, the need for protest shapes our public realm and vice versa. The design of our public realm informs the way we collectively bear witness to conflict and make our voices heard. The design of our streets, in particular, needs to accommodate a huge range of uses—from the activities of our most pedestrian of days to the influx of millions during extraordinary times. Many designers are asking these questions of each other, reiterating the potential impact design can have on our collective experience of public space during protest events. Just last month, Van Alen Institute held a flash competition inviting designers to come up with new ideas for improving the protest experience in New York City, yielding creative ideas like the use of enormous balloons to signal where protests are happening around the city.

Interested in these notions, we reached out to a number of designers (landscape architects, urban designers and planners) who participated in one of the many nation-wide marches on January 21, and asked them about their experience. This included designers that marched in Austin, Boston, Oakland, Houston, Washington DC, New York City, Denver, and Chicago. We asked:

  • How did the design of the street enable or hinder the experience of the march?
  • What was surprising about the way the street or public spaces performed during the marches?
  • Did your experience change the way you think about the design of city streets?

What follows are the recurring themes from their observations and speculative design provocations for each.

The There There

There is meaning in place. That is to say, each march was intentionally planned to start or conclude in a specific, culturally significant physical setting. Usually, this involved an iconic piece of architecture or monument associated with government—Los Angeles’ City Hall or Austin’s State House, for instance. One DC marcher noted the powerful moment when the White House Lawn was opened to protesters. At the same time, participants at other marches noted the lack of this focus. For instance, Chicago’s Grant Park and Boston’s Commons became the epicenter in those cities, but lacked a specific point of arrival or were overwhelmed by crowds in a way that made the focus inaccessible. While seemingly obvious, this tells us that citizens see certain spaces as the place to talk to their leaders, where their voices are somehow more likely to be heard.

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© Gina Ford and Martin Zogran

© Gina Ford and Martin Zogran

Design Provocation: What if we expanded the “There There” to be less singular (ie not just “at the monument” but “toward the monument”) and more intentionally designed for a procession? This could mean an orchestrated “parade route” replete with strategic plaza spaces—a gathering/launching place, a resting place or two and a finale space—and lined with supporting infrastructure (totems, banners, lighting). This would lengthen and enhance the experience for both marchers and those watching.

Mine, Yours, and Ours

Nearly every person, when asked to reflect on their experience, shared some intensely personal or profound moment. One woman recounted a chant for Sandra Bland on the streets of Austin and feeling overwhelmed by the way the sound carried to the sky. A man saw a woman in tears on a corner and had a moment of deep and unexpected empathy. Another person recounted hearing a young boy asking his mother questions about democracy, demonstrating wisdom well beyond his years. For many, the march was as personal as it was collective. For designers, this is a very interesting challenge—both for days of protest and for everyday use of our streets. How can we both enable a grand, civic, and flexible street while also allowing for the smaller, personal interactions? How can our great civic streets be both awe-inspiring, respectful of their role as foreground, while also being great places to hang out?

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© Gina Ford and Martin Zogran

© Gina Ford and Martin Zogran

Design Provocation: What if we enhanced the sense of everyday social interaction in ways both flexible and temporary? For instance—much like the famed Parking Day—underutilized spaces could become temporary gardens, dining terraces, recreational nooks and sitting spaces as needed. These could be easily disassembled or made denser on march days.

Safety in Numbers

Safety was at the forefront of many protesters’ minds. Many discussed the challenges of the unexpectedly large crowds. There were moments of concern for personal safety: Will I be able to get out of this situation easily? What if it were hotter? What if I had a medical emergency? There were also concerns for crowd safety. One official in Austin noted a terrifying and fleeting thought: What if the protest becomes a target for some form of attack? Will we be able to protect all of these people? Others observed the historic design intent of these streets: Was this street designed to embrace protest or squash it? Was it made more for protecting the government or for creating a place for its people?

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© Gina Ford and Martin Zogran

© Gina Ford and Martin Zogran

Design Provocation: What if we integrated new technology to better visualize, connect and communicate on city streets? Imagine building facades becoming real-time screens for sharing information—tweets, emergency information, or instructions.

The Devil is in the Details

While masterplans may be laid out on tolerances of feet, streets are experienced in inches. Many observed the micro-scaled dimensions as critical. Disposition and heights of curbs—hardly noticeable topography on an average day—suddenly had a notable influence on crowd movements. Cross slopes that might feel negligible to a car in motion proved stressful over time to slow-moving human bodies. Participants pointed to medians, material changes, and even potholes as surprisingly disruptive. Perhaps most importantly, many talked about these micro-topographies and shifts as significant challenges for the less able-bodied, the wheelchair-bound, or those with strollers. The location of curb ramps alternately became welcomed moments of progress and unexpected bottlenecks.

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© Gina Ford and Martin Zogran

© Gina Ford and Martin Zogran

Design Provocation: What if our streets were designed with universal accessibility in mind? We could eliminate the seemingly small but significant barrier of the curb in favor of a much freer and open platform. Temporary furnishings or site elements could instead serve barrier and crowd control needs and virtually disappear during large gatherings.

A Matter of Proportion

While micro-conditions were noted frequently, more often than not, participants also used words like “grand” to describe the experience of the major march routes. Marchers expressed both gratitude (for civic leadership allowing for these kinds of assemblies to happen) and surprise (noting a kind of renewed awareness of the need for such spaces). More granularly, much discussion focused on the specific dimensions and proportions of the street itself. What is the ideal relationship between widths of sidewalks and street dimensions? Why is so much of the street given over to cars? In a 21st century city, what percentage of the street should “belong” to the bicycle, the pedestrian, the car, or transit?

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© Gina Ford and Martin Zogran

© Gina Ford and Martin Zogran

Design Provocation: What if our streets were not uniform from block to block, but instead richly diverse and changing places? Imagine a street where the travel lanes for cars, pedestrian spaces, and planted spaces were intermixed and interlaced. In a future with self-driving cars, a direct open route may no longer need to be our public priority!

Getting High

Many respondents noted the value of elevation—both in terms of the ability for marchers to elevate themselves and for larger city-scaled elevation changes. Where marchers in Austin appreciated Congress Avenue’s impressive topographic change (allowing an awesome and immediate scan of the crowd), participants in Houston lamented the relative flatness of the downtown streets (which minimized the ability to read the same). Protesters in Chicago celebrated simple street furniture, stairs, and sturdy trees—all of which provided places for rest, but also mechanisms for climbing to get a better view or take a place of prominence to lead a chant. Many noted the energy and excitement offered by upper-level terraces or balconies on buildings along the march routes, allowing a more three-dimensional and immersive participation and experience.

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© Gina Ford and Martin Zogran

© Gina Ford and Martin Zogran

Design Provocation: What if the experience of the street became more three-dimensional? Imagine tree houses, elevated catwalks, outdoor terraces, and public bridges—places to perch above and witness the life of the street. At the ground level, tiered seating elements and furnishings could enable more spectator space.

The Art of the Long View

In places like Washington DC, Chicago and Austin, a series of very intentional relationships between building and open space drove the disposition of the city streets. Civic buildings and monuments of physical and symbolic prominence occupy high points or conclude long vistas. These relationships were noted in many different ways by march participants, but most frequently in a cinematographic way. Marchers used expressions like “turning a corner,” “seeing anew,” and “a dramatic vista.” Beyond pure orientation—which was certainly useful in such large gatherings—these landmarks contributed to the human experience of the marches, buttressing for many a sense of purpose and pride of place. Marchers even noted far less monumental architecture along the route as well—buildings that offered visual interest, engaging ground floor uses, or various forms of integrated shelter (awnings, porticos, etc). These observations reinforce the importance of land use planning and design in creating buildings that reinforce civic identity.

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© Gina Ford and Martin Zogran

© Gina Ford and Martin Zogran

Design Provocation: What if our streets were designed as a visual feast, with a focus on the pedestrian as the dominant spectator? Imagine a street where one would promenade down the center, rather than the edges, and where lighting, paving and planting systems were designed to be provocative artful installations rather than purely functional elements.

Throwing Shade

As already noted, marches took place across the world in a wide range of climates—from the snowy sidewalks of Fairbanks, Alaska to the sunny streets of Rio de Janeiro. Nearly everyone we spoke to, regardless of the weather they experienced personally, noted the need for greater consideration of human comfort in the design of our streets. Marchers often struggled with a lack of a wide range of amenities—from drinking fountains, to public restrooms, and seating. Some noted the challenges associated with microclimate, observing strong differences between well-landscaped and treed spaces versus broad expanses of paving. Others described the splendor of unintentional amenities—like staircases intended for building entry becoming a place for sitting and viewing or planters serving as crowd control elements.

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© Gina Ford and Martin Zogran

© Gina Ford and Martin Zogran

Design Provocation: What if we reimagined streets as having ceilings—perhaps covered by temporary or visually porous canopies? These systems could help shade and cool the street while also becoming a canvas of sorts for projections and art. At the human scale, pavilions and small pieces of architecture located strategically along the street could offer other kinds of comforts—shade, restrooms, information, or concessions.

In an era that seems poised to embrace new models of urban mobility—whether through the ever-promised driverless cars or a profound revolution in public transportation—the common space of our streets may soon be available for dramatic re-thinking. These provocations hopefully provide inspiration. In the meantime, it seems certain we will continue to see civic activity and protest in our streets. And as we prepare for these future events, we can consider January 21, 2017 positive proof that well-designed, multi-functional city streets are central to a thriving democracy.

Gina Ford is a principal and landscape architect in Sasaki‘s Urban Studio. The Urban Studio is an energized and interdisciplinary group of practitioners solely dedicated to the improvement of quality of life in cities through rigorous planning, exceptional design, and strong community partnerships. Gina’s work encompasses a wide range of scales and project types, from public parks and plazas to large-scale landscape planning and waterfront projects. She brings to each project a passion for the process of making vibrant landscape spaces—from the conceptual design to the details of implementation—with a particular focus on the life and use of urban, public environments.
Martin Zogran is a principal and urban designer in Sasaki‘s Urban Studio. With over 20 years of experience designing urban centers across the globe, Martin’s experience with mixed-use districts and large-scale framework plans spans many scales, from small urban infill sites to large scale regional plans. He searches for creative methods to combine economic goals, regulatory requirements, and ecological systems thinking into exciting and innovative places that foster long-term value.
At Sasaki, Martin leads much of the big-picture thinking for the urban design practice in order to foster and maintain Sasaki’s unique multi-disciplinary approach to urban design. He leads in-house think-tank sessions on current planning and urban design topics and promotes building professional development and skills for the wide array of urban design practices within the firm.

Updated Displays and Graphics Processors Improve iMacs’ Capabilities for Architectural Software

Updated Displays and Graphics Processors Improve iMacs’ Capabilities for Architectural Software, via Apple Special Event Streaming. June 5, 2017
via Apple Special Event Streaming. June 5, 2017

At Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) today, the US-based tech giant announced the latest slate of performance updates to their software and hardware products. Targeting software developers and other high-end users, the event was highlighted by the announcement of significant upgrades to their computer’s graphics and processing capabilities—or in architect’s terms—the components required to work on projects like creating content within a VR experience or real-time 3D rendering.

via Apple Special Event Streaming. June 5, 2017via Apple Special Event Streaming. June 5, 2017via Apple Special Event Streaming. June 5, 2017via Apple Special Event Streaming. June 5, 2017+11

Apple’s Mac computers will see boosted specs across the board. The most recent line of MacBook Pros, released last fall and criticized for their below-industry-standard numbers, will be equipped with the Intel’s “Kaby Lake” processors for increased performance. But it’s the stalwart iMac that will receive the biggest upgrades this time around: in addition to the Kaby Lake processors, the iMac line (including a brand new tier, the iMac Pro) will be loaded with new graphics cards that will improve speed by up to 3 times, allowing you to work more efficiently in programs like photoshop or rendering engines.

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via Apple Special Event Streaming. June 5, 2017

via Apple Special Event Streaming. June 5, 2017
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via Apple Special Event Streaming. June 5, 2017

via Apple Special Event Streaming. June 5, 2017

Spec Snapshot

iMac 21.5 inch: Intel Iris Plus 640 with 64MB eDRAM – 80% faster graphics
iMac 21.5 inch Retina 4K: Radeon Pro 555 & 560 with 4GB VRAM – 3x faster graphics
iMac 27-inch: Radeon 570, 575, & 580 with up to 8GB of VRAM

These new GPUs, paired with updates to iOS (“High Sierra”) mean that the iMac will be capable of supporting VR. A demo at the event illustrated this power by placing an Apple developer within a VRStar Wars environment, where she was able to manipulate and interact with the scene, including building and moving TIE fighters and dodging a lightsaber attack by Darth Vader – all powered by a single iMac.

https://giphy.com/embed/3oKIPz9FbGfjwPmRH2

via GIPHY

Other updates include iPad AR software for developers. One company confirmed to be making a new ARapp is IKEA, who will use the ‘ARKit’ to build software that will let you place IKEA furniture into your own home (or tiny studio apartment).

https://giphy.com/embed/3og0IF277jmVbV6L8k

via GIPHY

https://giphy.com/embed/xUA7bgA7CALfUUxCrC

via GIPHY

Apple also revealed the sequel to architect-favorite puzzle game Monument Valley, which features beautifully stylized MC Escher-type structures that players must navigate their way through.

For more from the Summer 2017 WWDC event, check out coverage from The Verge.