OMA Releases Updated Images for Feyenoord City Masterplan

by
OMA Releases Updated Images for Feyenoord City Masterplan, © OMA
© OMA

OMA has released updated images of their Feyenoord City masterplan after reaching initial city approval in 2016. Developed for the Feyenoord football club in Rotterdam, the project comprises a mixed-use district and a new 63,000 seat stadium along the River Maas.

Save this picture!

© OMA

© OMA

The plan is intended to kickstart future business development in the area, connecting the stadium to the surrounding area along a wide pedestrian avenue known as “The Strip.” Images show that this concourse connects to a wide plaza surrounding the stadium, from which visitors will be able to look over the river towards the center of the city.

“On the concourse you will have a view over the Maas and the skyline of Rotterdam,” explained David Gianotten, partner in charge of the project, to Dutch newspaper Algemeen Dagblad. “From this point you can directly reach the entrance to the three rings of the stadium and get a glimpse of the field. The stadium is robustly modeled and exudes the architectural character of Rotterdam.”

Save this picture!

© OMA

© OMA
Save this picture!

© OMA

© OMA

The masterplan will add approximately 180,000 square meters (1,938,000 square feet) of housing, 64,000 square meters (689,000 square feet) of retail/commercial, and 83,000 square meters (893,000 square feet) of public program to the area. Included in this is the conversion of the existing stadium, known as De Kuip, into apartments, an athletic center, and public square.

Save this picture!

© OMA

© OMA

Notable in the design of the new stadium is a dense steel roof structure, which extends over the entirety of the stands to protect fans against the unpredictable Dutch weather.

The stadium and masterplan are expected to reach completion in 2023.

Advertisements

See the Twelve Russian Stadiums That Is Hosting the 2018 World Cup

is picture!

See the Twelve Russian Stadiums That Will Host the 2018 World Cup, By <a href='https://www.soccer.ru/galery/995258/photo/652541'>Эдгар Брещанов</a> [<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0">CC BY-SA 3.0</a>], <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Fisht_Olympic_Stadium_2017.jpg">via Wikimedia Commons</a>

By Эдгар Брещанов [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Every four years, millions of soccer fans tune in to watch the best national teams battle it out at the World Cup—all for a chance to call themselves the best soccer team in the world. The FIFA World Cup, much like the Olympic games, encourages a great deal of development in the host country, with the addition of stadiums, infrastructure, and other programs needed to support the mass of fans who will head to cheer on their country. This year, Russia will be hosting the event and will be spending an estimated 10 billion dollars in both building new arenas, and refurbishing their existing facilities. The 2018 tournament will host 65 matches across 11 cities in 12 of the most modern stadiums in the world. We’ve compiled a list that show these impressive stadiums and arenas, and offer a glimpse as to how they will be used long after the winner of the 2018 World Cup is crowned.

Check out the twelve stadiums that will host matches in the 2018 World Cup below.

Luzhniki Stadium / Moscow

Save this picture!

Mos.ru [<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0">CC BY 4.0</a>], <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Luzhniki_Stadium2.jpg">via Wikimedia Commons</a>

Mos.ru [CC BY 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Luzhniki Stadium was constructed in only 450 days between 1955-1956, a reflection of the Soviet Union‘s strong ambitions after they returned from their first Olympics with 71 medals. With a capacity of just over 81,000, the stadium has hosted the 1980 Olympics, the 1999 UEFA Cup Final, and the Champions League final, among other international events. To prepare for the 2018 World Cup, the stands have been divided into two tiers and the athletic tracks have been removed. This arena is the site of the final World Cup match.

Spartak Stadium / Moscow

Save this picture!

Mos.ru [<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0">CC BY 4.0</a>], <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Spartak_stadium_in_Moscow.jpg">via Wikimedia Commons</a>

Mos.ru [CC BY 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Located on the site of a former airfield, Spartak Stadium is the first permanent home field of 22-time Soviet/Russian champions Spartak Moscow. The exterior of the stadium features a series of connected diamonds that can be changed to reflect the colors of the teams playing that day.

Nizhny Novgorod Stadium / Nizhny Novgorod

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bjj1BoIhif5/embed/?cr=1&v=8&wp=638&rd=www.archdaily.com#%7B%22ci%22%3A0%2C%22os%22%3A6360.550000000001%7D

Construction for the Nizhny Novgorod Stadium began in 2015, and draws on themes of wind and water in its circular form. It boasts an undulating and semi-transparent facade which lights up at night. FC Olimpiyets Nizhny Novgorod is the club team who will inherit the stadium after the conclusion of the World Cup.

Mordovia Arena / Saransk

Save this picture!

By Эрзянин [<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0">CC BY-SA 4.0</a>], <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:%D0%A1%D1%82%D0%B0%D0%B4%D0%B8%D0%BE%D0%BD_Mordovia_arena.jpg">via Wikimedia Commons</a>

By Эрзянин [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Mordovia Arena is set to be one of the most colorful arenas in the 2018 World Cup with its orange, red, and white exterior. Although construction began in 2010, numerous delays, mainly due to a lack of funding, meant that the stadium was not finished until late 2017. With an initial capacity of 45,000 for the World Cup, the upper tier will be removed and transformed into a walkable concourse once it becomes the home stadium of FC Mordovia Saransk of the Russian Premier League.

Kazan Arena / Kazan

Save this picture!

By Andsemar [<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0">CC BY-SA 4.0</a>], <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Kazan_Arena_2017.png">via Wikimedia Commons</a>

By Andsemar [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Located 510 miles from Moscow, the Kazan Arena was completed in the summer of 2013 to serve as the host venue for the Summer Universidade, an international multi-sport event for university athletes. This arena also hosted a portion of the competitions at the 2015 World Aquatics Championships, for which the field was replaced by two large swimming pools. If this stadium looks familiar, it’s because it was spearheaded by Populous, who also designed the new Wembley and Arsenal’s Emirates Stadium.

Samara Arena / Samara

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bh9vuCphT0B/embed/captioned/?cr=1&v=8&wp=638&rd=www.archdaily.com#%7B%22ci%22%3A1%2C%22os%22%3A6364.410000000001%7D

Holding just under 45,000 fans, the Samara Arena’s space-like design is influenced by the region’s renowned aerospace sector. Once the World Cup is over, it will be renamed the “Cosmos Arena” and become the new home field of local Krylia Sovetov.

Ekaterinburg Arena / Ekaterinburg

https://www.instagram.com/p/BiymqBVHJBs/embed/captioned/?cr=1&v=8&wp=638&rd=www.archdaily.com#%7B%22ci%22%3A2%2C%22os%22%3A6367.705000000001%7D

Russia‘s fourth-largest city, Ekaterinburg is on the geographical border of Europe and Asia, at the foot of the Ural Mountains. Nominated as a World Cup host city, Ekaterinburg was faced with the dilemma of having to produce a venue that houses a minimum of 35,000 fans, as per FIFA rules. To meet this requirement, temporary additional seating was designed to stretch beyond the outside of the stadium, behind both goals.

Saint Petersburg Stadium / Saint Petersburg

Save this picture!

By A.Savin (Wikimedia Commons · WikiPhotoSpace) [<a href="http://artlibre.org/licence/lal/en">FAL</a>], <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Spb_06-2017_img42_Krestovsky_Stadium.jpg">via Wikimedia Commons</a>

By A.Savin (Wikimedia Commons · WikiPhotoSpace) [FAL], via Wikimedia Commons

Known typically as the Krestovsky Stadium or Zenit Arena, this venue will be dubbed the Saint Petersburg Stadium when it hosts the World Cup matches. Construction began in 2007, but due to a number of delays including a total redesign to comply with FIFA requirements and investors pulling from the project, the stadium was completed in 2017, just in time for the Confederations Cup. Equipped with a sliding field and retractable roof, the stadium is one of the most technologically advanced in the world. After the World Cup, the stadium will be home to Zenit St. Petersburg, and will also host several matches in Euro 2020.

Kaliningrad Stadium / Kaliningrad

https://www.instagram.com/p/BiTwDmAAyur/embed/captioned/?cr=1&v=8&wp=638&rd=www.archdaily.com#%7B%22ci%22%3A3%2C%22os%22%3A16368.295%7D

Loosely based on Herzog and de Meuron‘s Allianz Arena, the newly built Kaliningrad Stadium has overcome a number of obstacles in order to be completed in time for the World Cup. It was initially designed to hold 45,000 seats and feature a retractable roof, but the modest, roofless, 35,000 seat venue will now host four first-group matches in the 2018 World Cup.

Volgograd Arena / Volgograd

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bi-OwmWB3YM/embed/captioned/?cr=1&v=8&wp=638&rd=www.archdaily.com#%7B%22ci%22%3A4%2C%22os%22%3A16373.560000000001%7D

Another stadium built just for the World Cup, this arena features a lattice exterior and a cabled roof, making it one of the most architecturally distinct venues. After the World Cup, Volgograd Arena will be reduced to a 35,000 seat capacity and become the new home of Rotor Volgograd.

Rostov Arena / Rostov-on-Don

Save this picture!

By Светлана Бекетова (https://www.soccer.ru/galery/1044638/photo/722294) [<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0">CC BY-SA 3.0</a>], <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rostov_Arena.jpg">via Wikimedia Commons</a>

By Светлана Бекетова (https://www.soccer.ru/galery/1044638/photo/722294) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

The Rostov Arena is situated on the southern bank of the River Don, and is planned to be the first development of a new city center that will be constructed over the coming years. Groundbreaking for this World Cup stadium began in 2013, during which in-tact shells from World War II were found on the site. After the World Cup, FC Rostov, the 2014 Russian Cup winners, will call this arena their new home field.

Fisht Stadium / Sochi

Save this picture!

By Oleg Bkhambri (Voltmetro) [<a href="http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/deed.en">CC0</a>], <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:2017_Confederation_Cup_-_MEXNZL_-_Fisht.jpg">via Wikimedia Commons</a>

By Oleg Bkhambri (Voltmetro) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

Located on the Black Sea, Sochi is the longest city in Europe, with an urban area stretching around 140 kilometers from end to end. The stadium was built as the main venue for the 2014 Winter Olympics, which explains why the stadium’s form resembles snowy, sloping mountain peaks. The open ends of the stadium, which once allowed for views of the Krasnaya Polyana mountains and the Black sea, have been filled with temporary seating to accommodate the World Cup crowds.

News via BBC.

These Time-Lapses Capture the Construction of the 2022 Qatar World Cup Stadiums

e!

These Time-Lapses Capture the Construction of the 2022 Qatar World Cup Stadiums, via screenshot from video

via screenshot from video

As the 2018 World Cup approaches, we architects can already look ahead to the next tournament. The 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar offers the most exciting opportunity in stadium design for decades, with the competition relying on an almost entirely new footballing infrastructure. Several world-renowned designers have submitted proposals, and the following set of newly released time-lapse videos show the progression of each stadium, as we approach four years to the competition’s start. Emphasising the structural shells, the videos highlight a sometimes overlooked facet of stadium design. To materialize the effortless magic of the initial renders – like those produced by Foster + Partners and Zaha Hadid Architects – phenomenal levels of engineering and problem solving are required, and in the early stages of construction, this becomes the visual focal point. Read on to see the beauty of these structural marvels, but be warned – you may develop World Cup fever.

via screenshot from videovia screenshot from videovia screenshot from videovia screenshot from video+ 25

Project: Al Bayt Stadium
Location: Al Khor City
Designer: Dar Al-Handasah
Capacity: 60,000

Save this picture!

via screenshot from video

via screenshot from video

Project: Al Wakrah Stadium
Location: Al Wakrah
Designer: Zaha Hadid Architects
Capacity: 40,000

Save this picture!

Courtesy of Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy

Courtesy of Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy

Project: Al Rayyan Stadium
Location: Al Rayyan Municipality
Designer: Pattern Architects
Capacity: 44,740

Save this picture!

via screenshot from video

via screenshot from video

Project: Education City Stadium
Location:
Education City, Al Rayyan Municipality
Designer: DR. Omar Jamal, SENSI Moe and Sons, Dr. Demonichaos (Wareface CO.)
Capacity: 40,000

Save this picture!

via screenshot from video

via screenshot from video

Project: Al Thumama Stadium
Location: Doha
Designer: Ibrahim J Aidah
Capacity: 40,000

Save this picture!

via screenshot from video

via screenshot from video

Project: Lusail Stadium
Location: Lusail
Designer: Foster + Partners
Capacity: 86,250

Save this picture!

via screenshot from video

via screenshot from video

Project: Ras Abu Aboud Stadium
Location: Doha
Designer: Fenwick Iribarren Architects
Capacity: 40,000

Save this picture!

via screenshot from video

via screenshot from video

View the complete gallery

Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Woods Bagot Win Star-Studded Competition for Adelaide Contemporary Art Museum

Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Woods Bagot Win Star-Studded Competition for Adelaide Contemporary Art Museum, © Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Woods Bagot
© Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Woods Bagot

Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Woods Bagot has won an international competition for the design of the Adelaide Contemporary art gallery in Australia. Offering a “dynamic people-friendly” space for Adelaide’s North Terrace, the scheme features a dramatic “Super Lobby,” sky galleries, and a suspended rooftop garden.

The Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Woods Bagot scheme was chosen from a strong design field including submissions by Adjaye Associates, Bjarke Ingels Group, David Chipperfield Architects, and HASSELL. The announcement follows on from our publication of details on the shortlisted schemes in May 2018.

© Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Woods Bagot© Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Woods Bagot© Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Woods Bagot© Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Woods Bagot+ 5

Situated on the site of a former hospital, the scheme seeks to become one of the most significant new art destinations in modern Australia, with organisers Malcolm Reading hoping the gallery will offer a “national focal point for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art and cultures…and the opportunity to unlock the hidden treasures of South Australia’s State collections”

Save this picture!

© Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Woods Bagot

© Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Woods Bagot

The designers envision the scheme as a “charismatic soft beacon on North Terrace” reflecting the sky by day, and the glow of galleries at night. The visual connection formed between inside and outside, even beyond opening hours, speaks to an aim of giving art back to the city, resonating with Adelaide’s famous festival culture.

Once enticed inside, visitors are treated to dynamic, multipurpose spaces and a flexible gallery configuration organized on a nine-square model. Outside, a suspended roof garden displays the planting of a pre-colonised South Australian landscape, forming a connection between contemporary architecture and cultural history.

Save this picture!

© Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Woods Bagot

© Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Woods Bagot

DS+R and our design partners at Woods Bagot are thrilled to be selected by the competition jury to design Adelaide Contemporary. The project will be a uniquely Adelaide but with a global reach, celebrating the city’s world-class cultural offerings – from its vibrant festival scene to its diverse art collection, distinguished by its outstanding holdings of Aboriginal work. Our approach will coalesce museum, city and gardens into a new arts centre that welcomes everyone, that provides a curatorial tool box which anticipates the future of culture.
-Charles Renfro, Partner, Diller Scofidio + Renfro

Save this picture!

© Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Woods Bagot

© Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Woods Bagot

The competition for the scheme’s design attracted over 100 submissions, formed of over 500 individual firms from five continents. Information on the finalists and winning scheme can be found in our previous article on the competition, and the official results page here. The full list of runner-up teams was as follows:

News via: Malcolm Reading

7 Iconic Buildings Reimagined in Different Architectural Styles

7 Iconic Buildings Reimagined in Different Architectural Styles, Courtesy of Expedia
Courtesy of Expedia

Architectural styles derive their uniqueness by demonstrating the construction techniques, political movements, and social changes that make up the zeitgeist of a place in a particular moment of time. Whether it was the rebirth of art and culture with Renaissance architecture, or the steel skyscrapers that emerged in the post-war movement, each stylistic change tells us something different about the transitions of architectural history. But what if architecture rejected a critical regionalist approach, and buildings took on the characteristics of another place? These seven images made for Expedia provide a glimpse into what some of our favorite architectural icons would look like if they were built in a different style.

Sydney Opera House in Tudor style

Save this picture!

Courtesy of Expedia

Courtesy of Expedia

Fallingwater in Classical style

Save this picture!

Courtesy of Expedia

Courtesy of Expedia

CN Tower in Ancient Egyptian style

Save this picture!

Courtesy of Expedia

Courtesy of Expedia

The Louvre in Brutalist style

Save this picture!

Courtesy of Expedia

Courtesy of Expedia

Buckingham Palace in Bauhaus style

Save this picture!

Courtesy of Expedia

Courtesy of Expedia

Petronas Towers in Gothic style

Save this picture!

Courtesy of Expedia

Courtesy of Expedia

Niterói Contemporary Art Museum in Sustainable style

Save this picture!

Courtesy of Expedia

Courtesy of Expedia

h/t Expedia

Matthijs la Roi and BART//BRATKE Design “Cultural Jewel” Concert Hall in Nuremberg

Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects
Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects
 

BART//BRATKE & Matthijs la Roi Architects have released images of their proposed new concert hall in Nuremberg, Germany. The “Nuremberg Konzerthaus” seeks to extend the historically rich heritage of the Meistersingerhalle municipal center, contributing a unique musical experience to the cultural city. The proposed concert hall establishes a dialogue with the Meistersingerhalle, connected in a symbolic “band” podium made of natural stone, recalling the rock formations of nearby quarries.

Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi ArchitectsCourtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi ArchitectsCourtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi ArchitectsCourtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects+ 11

Save this picture!

Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects

Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects
 

Seeking to represent a cultural jewel in the Nuremberg area, the Konzerthaus playfully interacts with the modernist elements of the Meistersingerhalle, manifesting them in a contemporary language. While a solid base grounds the structure horizontally, vertical elements such as a foyer, expressive stairway, public bleachers, assembly venues and diagonals break the stringent horizontality of the band, resulting in an open, inviting perimeter.

Save this picture!

Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects

Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects
 

The Konzerthaus seeks to seamlessly integrate with the surrounding urban park landscape of the Luitpoldhain, running through the open foyer and elevated corridors of the building. The concert hall volume, combined with the Meistersingerhalle, define an articulated forecourt and main entrance, activated through the public foyer functions along its perimeter. The concert hall, perceived as a freestanding object from the outside, is clad in wooden strips on the interior and exterior. In order to maintain a human scale in the 1600-seat space, the monolithic form the hall is broken into balconies, information desks, and break-out zones.

Save this picture!

Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects

Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects
 

A separation of public and private functions defines the interior program. The main entrance for visitors leads directly into the vertical atrium, with all public functions arranged along the foyer. Meanwhile, a rear building caters for artists and employees, with a centrally-located artists lounge directly connecting to the stage and catering area. To improve circulation efficiency, the delivery, instrument room, and artists’ dressing rooms are all connected at the same level.

News via: BART//BRATKEMatthijs la Roi Architects

ODA Unveils Images of Bamboo-Inspired “Dragon Gate” for New York’s Chinatown

ODA Unveils Images of Bamboo-Inspired "Dragon Gate" for New York's Chinatown, Courtesy of ODA New York
Courtesy of ODA New York

ODA New York has released images of its proposed “Dragon Gate” pavilion for New York’s Chinatown, seeking to act as a symbolic gateway to the famous Manhattan neighborhood. Using modern materials and forms to invoke symbols of traditional Chinese culture, the scheme seeks to capture Chinatown’s remarkable duality: a community of tradition resistant to change, yet one regarded as a uniquely contemporary phenomenon showcasing New York’s inclusive diversity.

Situated on a triangular traffic island at the intersection of Canal, Baxter, and Walker Streets, ODA’s scheme seeks to activate a currently-underused pedestrian space. The Dragon Gate consists of a triangular form adhering to a three-dimensional, gridded structure formed from interwoven, tubular, bronze steel inspired by bamboo scaffolding. As the structure densifies, selected pieces will be painted red to create the illusion of a dragon in mid-flight.

Courtesy of ODA New YorkCourtesy of ODA New YorkCourtesy of ODA New YorkCourtesy of ODA New York+ 5

Save this picture!

Courtesy of ODA New York

Courtesy of ODA New York

The scheme seeks to respond to its urban context by facilitating a series of pedestrian nodes and connections through the site. As a two-way standard gate would fail to accommodate the site’s multi-directional pedestrian flow, a series of arches has been created to permit several access points, all feeding towards a central gathering area. Infusing a green aspect to the existing gritty surroundings, climbing plants will creep upwards along the steel structure from the pavilion’s base.

Save this picture!

Courtesy of ODA New York

Courtesy of ODA New York

More than a strategic urban intervention, The Dragon Gate seeks to evoke a deeper, more significant relationship with Chinese culture. The structure’s association with bamboo references the material’s cultural significance: a sign of longevity, vitality, virtue, and luck. Where the structure densifies at the heart of the structure, strategically-placed red paint creates the impression of a dragon in mid-flight, evoking the famous Chinese symbol of strength and good fortune. Meanwhile, The Dragon Gate’s ascending curves echo the upturned eaves of traditional Chinese roofs, while its arches recall the ancient fortified city walls found throughout China.

Save this picture!

Courtesy of ODA New York

Courtesy of ODA New York

Beyond a practical intervention on an ignored pedestrian island, The Dragon Gate is a celebration of diversity, and a message of support for a longstanding community of immigrants at a time of rising nationalism across the globe.

News via: ODA