Foster + Partners Reveal Updated Designs for Intermodal Transportation Hub in Spain

Foster + Partners Reveal Updated Designs for Intermodal Transportation Hub in Spain, © Foster + Partners
© Foster + Partners

Foster + Partners and Juan Cabanelas have unveiled updated designs for the refurbishment and extension of the Ourense FFCC Station in Galicia, Spain. The firm was originally selected as the winners of an international competition for the design in 2011 with an expansive new structure spanning the tracks. The new scheme will instead utilize the existing station building, expanding with a series of columned canopies arranged to create a new urban square and easily-accessible multi-modal hub.

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© Foster + Partners

© Foster + Partners

The integrated design will join the high-speed rail and nearby bus station (also currently under design) into one single urban intervention, as well as create pedestrian connections between the neighborhoods on either side of the tracks through an elevated walkway and new public park. The station will accommodate the increase in passengers generated by ongoing upgrades to the region’s high-speed rail lines, offering cafes and shops that will cater to travellers and locals alike.

The modular canopy system will be made up of concrete plates on slender columns, designed to provide shelter from the city’s high-temperature, high-precipitation climate and to allow for ease of future growth. The color of the concrete will be matched to the granite found in the existing station, creating harmony between the new and the old. In front of the building, a new water feature inspired byOurense’s famous hot water springs will welcome passengers into the city.

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© Foster + Partners

© Foster + Partners

Inside, the main lobby has been transformed into a triple-height space that will provide an abundance of natural light and historic frescos on the upper walls will be restored. Circulation through the station has been simplified to provide a more intuitive route for passengers, with clear sightlines connecting the check-in area with the platforms. An internal link will provide a direct connection to the bus station to the west, providing an easy path between transportation systems.

News via Foster + Partners.

Legendary Rugby Players Help HOK Design the Stadium of Tomorrow

Legendary Rugby Players Help HOK Design the Stadium of Tomorrow , The design of the perfect rugby stadium was a collaboration between HOK and four rugby legends. Image Courtesy of HOK
The design of the perfect rugby stadium was a collaboration between HOK and four rugby legends. Image Courtesy of HOK
 

Few architectural typologies are more centered around the human experience than a sporting arena. The design of sports stadiums often feature notable architecture firms, such as Herzog & de Meuron’s design for Chelsea’s football stadium in London, and Kengo Kuma’s 2020 Olympic Stadium in Tokyo. Recently, renowned design practice HOK tackled stadium design using an obvious yet untapped resource in the design of rugby stadiums –rugby players themselves.

John Rhodes, a director of HOK’s Sports + Recreation + Entertainment practice, met with legendary rugby players Jamie Roberts (Wales), Tim Visser (Scotland), James Horwill (Australia) and Danny Care (England) to capture their ideas, both as players and fans. The findings were collated into a video by HOK, which you can watch below.

The design of the perfect rugby stadium was a collaboration between HOK and four rugby legends. Image Courtesy of HOKFiber optic pitches could display real time information to fans. Image Courtesy of HOKGPS connectivity could stream player statistics to fans. Image Courtesy of HOKThe design of the perfect rugby stadium was a collaboration between HOK and four rugby legends. Image Courtesy of HOK+14

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The design of the perfect rugby stadium was a collaboration between HOK and four rugby legends. Image Courtesy of HOK

The design of the perfect rugby stadium was a collaboration between HOK and four rugby legends. Image Courtesy of HOK
 

The rugby legends placed heavy influence on the connection between players and fans, highlighting how city center stadiums create the pre-match drama of players driving through bustling streets. Furthermore, the decreased area of city stadiums is mitigated by steeper viewing stands, creating a more intimate connection between fans and players. As a throwback to the rugby stadiums of the 1960s, the players proposed an enlarged standing area in the action-fueled ‘red zone’ between the 22m line and touch line, generating further density and noise from excited fans.

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The project was headed by John Rhodes of HOK. Image Courtesy of HOK

The project was headed by John Rhodes of HOK. Image Courtesy of HOK
 
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GPS connectivity could stream player statistics to fans. Image Courtesy of HOK

GPS connectivity could stream player statistics to fans. Image Courtesy of HOK
 

Connectivity and modern technology were also at the forefront of the legends’ minds. A fiber optics playing field could display real-time information to fans during intervals, whilst player-tracking GPS currently used for team statistics could be made available to fans, measuring everything from distance run to force of collisions. More radically, a movable overhead gantry could follow the action, projecting a laser to mark the game line whilst providing an incredible aerial view for lucky spectators.

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Fiber optic pitches could display real time information to fans. Image Courtesy of HOK

Fiber optic pitches could display real time information to fans. Image Courtesy of HOK
 
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An overhead gantry could follow the game line, providing an aerial view for spectators. Image Courtesy of HOK

An overhead gantry could follow the game line, providing an aerial view for spectators. Image Courtesy of HOK
 

Any modern, iconic sports ground must provide an exceptional experience for fans. The unique passion of fans is fundamental to the sport and, as architects, we need to design stadiums that maximize this energy…The players gave us exceptional insight into what affects elite athletes. As avid fans, they also provided an invaluable perspective. This has improved our understanding of how to design the best stadiums for both rugby fans and players – John Rhodes, Director ofHOK Sports, Recreation + Energy.

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GPS connectivity could stream player statistics to fans. Image Courtesy of HOK

GPS connectivity could stream player statistics to fans. Image Courtesy of HOK
 
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Standing areas in the 'red zone' could generate more density and noise from excited fans. Image Courtesy of HOK

Standing areas in the ‘red zone’ could generate more density and noise from excited fans. Image Courtesy of HOK
 

News via: HOK.

The Textural, Geometric Surfaces of AL_A’s MAAT in Lisbon

The Textural, Geometric Surfaces of AL_A's MAAT in Lisbon, © Joel Filipe
© Joel Filipe

After a study of Madrid’s exuberantly geometric architecture, Digital Designer and Creative Director Joel Filipe continues his formal exploration in a series of photos of the MAAT by AL_A that celebrates the delicate impression of its undulating white tile facade against the bright Lisbon sky. Situated on the Tagus River, architect Amanda Levete creates a reunion between the river and the city with MAAT’s walkable rooftop terrace that draws visitors from the nearby streets of Belem, and with the promenade which steps down to meet the water. The roof provides a gathering space during the day and a place to screen films at night. The low-lying gentle arch of the building allows for a clever play of shadows and light, along with a nod to rippling water.

© Joel Filipe© Joel Filipe© Joel Filipe© Joel Filipe+19

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© Joel Filipe

© Joel Filipe

Filipe captures an abstracted view of the building, choosing to highlight the building’s playful form and mix of textures rather than its habitable space. Offering a glimpse at intimate moments such as where the steps meet the facade, these photos exemplify the attention to detail that allows the museum to slip seamlessly into the fabric of Lisbon and the waterfront.

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© Joel Filipe

© Joel Filipe
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© Joel Filipe

© Joel Filipe
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© Joel Filipe

© Joel Filipe
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© Joel Filipe

© Joel Filipe
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© Joel Filipe

© Joel Filipe
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© Joel Filipe
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© Joel Filipe

© Joel Filipe

See the Proposed Sites of LA’s 2024 Olympic Bid

See the Proposed Sites of LA's 2024 Olympic Bid, Main Stadium - Future home of the NFL's LA Rams. Image Courtesy of LA 2024
Main Stadium – Future home of the NFL’s LA Rams. Image Courtesy of LA 2024

As the race for the 2024 Olympics bid has been narrowed down to just two cities, the LA 2024 committee has revealed the latest plans for its bid. While the central appeal of Los Angeles would be its existing sports and transportation infrastructure (a key concern following the economic struggles of many recent host cities), the city would still see a comprehensive update of venues and several new structures.

Downtown Sports Park - LA Live Aerial. Image Courtesy of LA 2024Downtown Sports Park - Figueroa Corridor. Image Courtesy of LA 2024Downtown Sports Park - Marathon Finish - City Hall. Image Courtesy of LA 2024Downtown Sports Park - LA Convention Center - Table Tennis. Image Courtesy of LA 2024+25

As shown in the LA 2024 map, a majority of events would be distributed between 4 main sports parks: Downtown, Valley, South Bay and Long Beach.

Downtown Sports Park

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Downtown Sports Park - LA Live Aerial. Image Courtesy of LA 2024

Downtown Sports Park – LA Live Aerial. Image Courtesy of LA 2024

The largest of the proposed locations, the Downtown Sports Park would center around the existing LA Live Sports and Entertainment District. Main venues here would include the Staples Center, the LA Convention Center, LA Football Club Stadium and the LA Memorial Coliseum. Several buildings on the University of Southern California’s campus would be utilized, including the transformation of a baseball stadium into the main swimming venue. The Olympic media village would be located within new USC dormitories.

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Downtown Sports Park - Figueroa Corridor. Image Courtesy of LA 2024

Downtown Sports Park – Figueroa Corridor. Image Courtesy of LA 2024
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Downtown Sports Park - Marathon Finish - City Hall. Image Courtesy of LA 2024

Downtown Sports Park – Marathon Finish – City Hall. Image Courtesy of LA 2024
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Downtown Sports Park - LA Football Club - Soccer. Image Courtesy of LA 2024

Downtown Sports Park – LA Football Club – Soccer. Image Courtesy of LA 2024
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Media Village at USC. Image Courtesy of LA 2024

Media Village at USC. Image Courtesy of LA 2024

Downtown Sports Park - USC Dedeaux Field - Swimming. Image Courtesy of LA 2024Downtown Sports Park - LA Coliseum - Track & Field. Image Courtesy of LA 2024Downtown Sports Park - Staples Center - Basketball. Image Courtesy of LA 2024Downtown Sports Park - LA Convention Center - Taekwondo. Image Courtesy of LA 2024+25

Valley Sports Park

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Valley Sports Park - Aerial. Image Courtesy of LA 2024

Valley Sports Park – Aerial. Image Courtesy of LA 2024

Located in the Sepulveda Basin Recreation Area, the Valley Sports Park would be a temporary complex that could be easily dismantled following the conclusion of the Games. Canoeing/Kayaking, Shooting, and Equestrian events would feature here.

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Valley Sports Park - Equestrian. Image Courtesy of LA 2024

Valley Sports Park – Equestrian. Image Courtesy of LA 2024
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Valley Sports Park - Canoe & Kayaking. Image Courtesy of LA 2024

Valley Sports Park – Canoe & Kayaking. Image Courtesy of LA 2024

South Bay Sports Park

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South Bay Sports Park - Tennis Center. Image Courtesy of LA 2024

South Bay Sports Park – Tennis Center. Image Courtesy of LA 2024

Located in Carson, the South Bay Sports Park would take advantage of the existing StubHub Center athletic complex, which contains a main stadium, a velodrome and tennis center. The Stadium would host rugby during week one, and the modern pentathlon in the second week.

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South Bay Sports Park - Field Hockey & Tennis. Image Courtesy of LA 2024

South Bay Sports Park – Field Hockey & Tennis. Image Courtesy of LA 2024
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South Bay Sports Park - Stubhub Velodrome - Cycling. Image Courtesy of LA 2024

South Bay Sports Park – Stubhub Velodrome – Cycling. Image Courtesy of LA 2024
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South Bay Sports Park - Modern Pentathalon. Image Courtesy of LA 2024

South Bay Sports Park – Modern Pentathalon. Image Courtesy of LA 2024

Long Beach Sports Park

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Long Beach Sports Park. Image Courtesy of LA 2024

Long Beach Sports Park. Image Courtesy of LA 2024

The Long Beach Sports Park would contain a mix of existing and temporary venues, including two large-scale facilities for water polo and BMX that could be disassembled and repurposed at the conclusion of the their use. Water-based events, such as open-water swimming and triathlon would be held along the waterfront, while sailing would take place at the Belmont Pier. The Long Beach Convention Center and Arena would serve as a warmup facility and as a venue for handball matches.

Other Venues

The Opening Ceremonies would be held at the new LA Stadium at Hollywood Park (slated to open in 2019). The surrounding entertainment complex would provide visitor amenities as well as host archery events. The Olympic Village would be located within dormitory buildings at UCLA.

Learn more and see the full plans for LA 2024, here.

News via LA 2024.

New Renderings Show Major Changes to Zumthor’s LACMA Redesign

New Renderings Show Major Changes to Zumthor's LACMA Redesign, © Atelier Peter Zumthor
© Atelier Peter Zumthor

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) has released the newest renderings of their planned Atelier Peter Zumthor-led $600 million renovation, and one thing in particular stands out: the building is no longer black.

While the third major revision to the design sees the building retain the overall shape of its previous iteration, many aspects have changed, including how the floating mass touches the ground and the facade’s new sandy color.

© Atelier Peter Zumthor© Atelier Peter Zumthor & Partner/The Boundary© Atelier Peter Zumthor© Atelier Peter Zumthor+10

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© Atelier Peter Zumthor & Partner/The Boundary

© Atelier Peter Zumthor & Partner/The Boundary

“It took me a while to sort of let go of the baby,” Zumthor told the LA Times’ Christopher Hawthorne. “But I think I’ve figured it out. I’m happy. It’s less slick and more substantial. Elemental. If I’m lucky the building will be like some kind of an Inca temple that’s always been in the sand and now they’ve excavated it — a really old piece that’s always been there.”

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© Atelier Peter Zumthor

© Atelier Peter Zumthor
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© Atelier Peter Zumthor

© Atelier Peter Zumthor

Rather than the oil-slick inspired look of previous iterations, Hawthorne notices, the most recent submission bears more in common with the architect’s “sober and deeply effective” Kolumba Museum in Cologne, Germany.

The color change allows the building’s exterior to match its interior finishes, giving the overall structure a monolithic sense similar to the pre columbian aesthetic of Frank Lloyd Wright’s California homes.

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© Atelier Peter Zumthor

© Atelier Peter Zumthor
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© Atelier Peter Zumthor

© Atelier Peter Zumthor

The building’s main gallery level will continue to span over the adjacent Wilshire Boulevard, and will now definitively touch down or seven thick legs providing access to the plaza below, which is being designed in collaboration with artist Robert Irwin and landscape architecture office Olin.

Inside, three types of gallery spaces (“pocket,” the smallest; “cluster”; and “tower,” which will be washed in natural light from high, hidden clerestory windows) will provide different atmospheres for the display of art. The upper concrete plate of the gallery level will now extend out past the floor-to-ceiling glass facade to provide shade for the spaces within.

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© Atelier Peter Zumthor

© Atelier Peter Zumthor

Learn more about the most recent changes, here.

News via LACMA, LA Times.

Sasaki Unveils Design for Sunqiao, a 100-Hectare Urban Farming District in Shanghai

Sasaki Unveils Design for Sunqiao, a 100-Hectare Urban Farming District in Shanghai, Courtesy of Sasaki
Courtesy of Sasaki
 

With nearly 24 million inhabitants to feed and a decline in the availability and quality of agricultural land, the Chinese megacity of Shanghai is set to realize the Sunqiao Urban Agricultural District, a 100-hectare masterplan designed by US-based firm Sasaki Associates. Situated between Shanghai’s main international airport and the city center, Sunqiao will introduce large-scale vertical farming to the city of soaring skyscrapers. While primarily responding to the growing agricultural demand in the region, Sasaki’s vision goes further, using urban farming as a dynamic living laboratory for innovation, interaction, and education.

Courtesy of SasakiCourtesy of SasakiCourtesy of SasakiCourtesy of Sasaki+17

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Courtesy of Sasaki

Courtesy of Sasaki
 
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Courtesy of Sasaki

Courtesy of Sasaki
 

Shanghai is an ideal city for vertical farming. High land prices make building upwards more economically viable than building outwards, while the demand for leafy greens in the typical Shanghainese diet can be met with efficient urban hydroponic and aquaponics systems. Sasaki’s masterplan therefore deploys a range of urban-friendly farming techniques, such as algae farms, floating greenhouses, green walls, and vertical seed libraries.

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Courtesy of Sasaki

Courtesy of Sasaki
 
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Courtesy of Sasaki

Courtesy of Sasaki
 

Sunqiao represents more than a factory for food production, however. Sasaki’s masterplan creates a robust public realm, celebrating agriculture as a key component of urban growth. An interactive greenhouse, science museum, aquaponics showcase, and festival market signal an attempt to educate generations of children about where their food comes from. Meanwhile, sky plazas, office towers, and civic greens represent a desire to create a mixed-use, dynamic, active environment far removed from traditional, sprawling, rural farmlands.

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Courtesy of Sasaki

Courtesy of Sasaki
 
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Courtesy of Sasaki

Courtesy of Sasaki
 

Sunqiao will not be an alien concept to Shanghai. Whereas western countries depend on large-scale, rural, corporate farming, small-scale agriculture has traditionally dominated Shanghai’s urban landscape. However, the scale of Sasaki’s approved scheme does indicate the increased value placed on China’s agriculture sector. China is the world’s biggest consumer and exporter of agricultural products, with the industry providing 22% of the country’s employment, and 13% of its Gross Domestic Product. The Chinese government is therefore keen to preserve, modernize, and showcase an industry which has helped to significantly reduce poverty rates, and has influenced the growth of the biotech and textile industries.

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Courtesy of Sasaki

Courtesy of Sasaki
 
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Courtesy of Sasaki

Courtesy of Sasaki
 

“This approach actively supports a more sustainable food network while increasing the quality of life in the city through a community program of restaurants, markets, a culinary academy, and pick-your-own experience” explained Sasaki in a press release. “As cities continue to expand, we must continue to challenge the dichotomy between what is urban and what is rural. Sunqiao seeks to prove that you can have your kale and eat it too.”

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Courtesy of Sasaki

Courtesy of Sasaki
 
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Courtesy of Sasaki

Courtesy of Sasaki
 

Construction of the Sunqiao Urban Agricultural District is due to begin in 2017.

News via: Sasaki Associates

KPF’s One Bayfront Plaza to Share Title of Miami’s Tallest Tower

KPF's One Bayfront Plaza to Share Title of Miami's Tallest Tower, © KPF
© KPF

Renderings have been revealed of KPF’s One Bayfront Plaza, a 92-story mixed-use tower in downtown Miami that when completed will reach 1,049 feet tall, becoming one of 5 new buildings that will share the title of Miami’s tallest tower.

The project is being developed by Florida East Coast Realty, and will bring 902 apartments, 200 hotels rooms, 532,000 square feet of office space and 104,000 square feet of retail to downtown Miami. Located at 100 South Biscayne Boulevard, the project will total 3.3 million square feet.

© KPF© KPF© KPF© KPF+4

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© KPF

© KPF

The most recent plans were revealed after original plans for a two-tower, 4-million-plus square foot complex were scrapped. The new scheme will feature a single tower, and a higher apartment to commercial space ratio.

An existing office building on the site is expected to be demolished by 2019, with construction on the tower beginning shortly after.

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© KPF

© KPF
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© KPF

© KPF

Historically, building heights in Miami have been restricted due to proximity to the Miami International Airport; these restrictions were recently loosened, allowing several new towers to stake claim to the city’s tallest tower, including One Bayfront Plaza and Foster + Partners’ ‘The Towers’ at 1201 Brickell Bay Drive, which is also being developed by FECR.

News via Architect’s Newspaper.