OMA / Reinier de Graaf’s Residential Towers, Norra Tornen, Wins the International Highrise Award 2020

© Laurian Ghinitoiu, Courtesy of OMA

The International Highrise Award (IHA), organized by the city of Frankfurt and the Deutsches Architekturmuseum (DAM), has selected Norra Tornen, the residential towers designed by OMA / Reinier de Graaf as the winner of its ninth edition. Granted every 2 years, to architects and developers for buildings of minimum 100 meters in height, completed in the last two years, Norra Tornen was selected from 31 projects from 14 countries.

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Designed by OMA and led by Reinier de Graaf, with Alex de Jong, Michel van de Kar, and Roza Matveeva, with Oscar Properties as developers on board, Norra Tornen was awarded the International Highrise Award by an international jury consisting of architects, structural engineers, and real estate specialists. Criteria of evaluation included the overall narrative, the sculptural qualities, the structural concept, and the mix of uses, among others. The project that has received international attention is the “result of a land allocation competition held by the City of Stockholm in 2013, won by Oscar Properties”.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu, Courtesy of OMA
© Laurian Ghinitoiu, Courtesy of OMA
© Laurian Ghinitoiu, Courtesy of OMA
© Laurian Ghinitoiu, Courtesy of OMA

OMA’s first built project in Sweden, Norra Tornen is currently the highest residential building in Stockholm’s city center. On the accomplishment, Reinier de Graaf, OMA Partner in Charge of the project stated that “For me, the award came somewhat unexpectedly since I never thought of the Norra Tornen towers as high-rise buildings. They are different from the conventional idea of a skyscraper. They are not monumental but homely, their aesthetics are informal and they rely on repetition only to produce diversityMoreover, Peter Cahorla Schmal, Director of the Deutsches Architekturmuseum (DAM) added that “Norra Tornen is a refreshing entrance to the city, recalling structuralist models of brutalism from the 1960s such as the Habitat from Expo67 in Montreal, skillfully transforming them and enriching the city with a new urban dominant, with apartments for all.


Related Article

Five Projects Named Finalists for the 2020 International Highrise Award


© Laurian Ghinitoiu, Courtesy of OMA
© Laurian Ghinitoiu, Courtesy of OMA
© Laurian Ghinitoiu, Courtesy of OMA
© Laurian Ghinitoiu, Courtesy of OMA

Norra Tornen

  • Dates
  • Competition: 2013
  • Groundbreaking (Innovationen): December 2015
  • Groundbreaking (Helix): December 2016
  • Completion (Innovationen): December 2018
  • Completion (Helix): December 2020
  • Program
  • Two residential towers: Helix and Innovationen
  • 320 apartments 24,555 m²
  • Retail 961 m² Services 895 m² Technical spaces 2,300m²
  • Data
  • Plot Area (Helix): 575 m²
  • Plot Area (Innovationen): 660 m²
  • Net floor area (Helix): 14,039 m²
  • Net floor area (Innovationen): 17,787 m²
  • Net floor area (total): 31,826 m²
  • Gross floor area (Helix): 18,820 m²
  • Gross floor area (Innovationen): 23,479 m²
  • Gross floor area (total): 42,299 m²
  • Height (Helix): 110 m (32 floors)
  • Height (Innovationen): 125 m (36 floors)
  • Materials
  • Façade: Colored concrete ribbed façade, brushed with an exposed multi-colored aggregate pebble mix.

Accessibility at the new U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Museum reviewed

The United States Olympic and Paralympic Museum in Colorado Springs, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Photo: Jason O’Rear.

The museum’s other notable attribute is its high level of accessibility. The architects borrowed inspiration from the Guggenheim Museum, which invites visitors to take an elevator to the top floor and then descend along ramps as they explore galleries. There are no steps up or down, and the goal is to eliminate any differences in the museum experience among people with varying physical abilities. — The New York Times

For the NYT, Ray Mark Rinaldi reviews the DS+R-designed United States Olympic and Paralympic Museum with a special focus on accessibility. “Accommodations are the norm,” Rinaldi writes. “Ramps are low-grade and extra wide to fit two wheelchairs at the same time. Sign language interpreters appear in the corner of videos. Cane guards double as benches in the building’s spacious atrium.”

Previously on Archinect: Twisting forms and ramped galleries define DS+R’s US Olympics and Paralympics Museum in Colorado

The 60,000-square-foot museum complex in Colorado Springs, Colorado opened to the public in July

Is It Possible To Turn Plastic Waste Into Affordable Housing?


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Is It Possible To Turn Plastic Waste Into Affordable Housing?, Courtesy of Othalo
Courtesy of Othalo

For decades, companies have relied on disposable plastic packaging to bag and contain products worldwide. Today, the staggering detrimental effects of this plastic dependence are well-known: since the 1950’s, over 9 billion tons of plastic have been produced, only 9% of which was recycled; around the world, one million plastic bottles are bought every minute and two million plastic bags are used every minute; and per the Plastic Pollution Coalition, by 2050, the oceans will contain more plastic than fish by weight. Moreover, plastic is a petroleum product, and its production only further contributes to the devastating climate effects of mass fossil fuel use.

As concerns over pollution and global warming escalate, other humanitarian issues, notably homelessness, remain equally pressing. According to the United Nations Human Settlements Program, 1.6 billion people around the world live in inadequate housing, and available data suggests that over 100 million people have no housing at all. In Sub-Saharan Africa alone, the immediate need for low-cost housing is 160 million units and is expected to increase to 350 million by 2050. Moreover, COVID-19 has only exacerbated this issue of homelessness and the houseless have been especially vulnerable to contracting the disease. Thus, on World Habitat Day earlier this month, UN-Habitat launched a partnership with the Norwegian startup Othalo to combat both issues—plastic pollution and homeless—at once.

Courtesy of Othalo
Courtesy of Othalo

Othalo, formally established in 2019, is known for its patented technology that mass produces building systems from recycled plastic waste. These buildings can include housing, refugee shelters, temperature controlled mobile storage units for food and medicine, schools, and hospitals. Moreover, all of these structures are affordable, sustainable, eco-friendly, and meet modern living standards—and are all made of recycled plastic. A single 60 square meter home upcycles eight tons of plastic; with the amount of plastic waste currently polluting the planet, one billion Othalo homes could be manufactured.

Furthermore, according to a press video by Othalo, these fabricated building systems are designed to be flexible and can be molded to meet endless possibilities. Othalo’s designers created a series of modules that can be locked together, permitting a wide variety of buildings to be made from these core components. In the video, it suggests whole communities of Othalo plastic housing designed to meet the needs of the surrounding area.

Courtesy of Othalo
Courtesy of Othalo

The founder of Othalo, Frank Cato Lahti, has worked on developing this technology since 2016 in partnership with SINTEF and the University in Tromsø. Now, he has also teamed up with architect Julien De Smedt and Young Global Leader Silje Vallestad. From an architectural standpoint, De Smedt said of the Othalo project: “In thinking new environments we will set our focus towards the co-creation of living conditions in direct partnership with the local communities and end users. What we find particularly uplifting in our approach as a company and as architects is the desire to bridge the manufacturing world with the one of the local crafts and culture.” As the project continues to unfold now in partnership with UN-Habitat, it becomes more urgent than ever that the company adheres to its stated goals.

Why Choose Modular Construction?

Why Choose Modular Construction?, Courtesy of Modular Building Institute (MBI)
Courtesy of Modular Building Institute (MBI)

As every professional in the building industry knows, construction can be a costly and endlessly time-consuming endeavor. Delays are almost more frequent than on-time construction, and can be induced by extensive bureaucratic requirements, weather and other unexpected circumstances, inadequate planning, too few personnel, or a whole host of other causes. Lengthy construction projects can also negatively impact public perception of a project even before it has been built, especially if the projects experience delays or inconvenience those who live or work close to the building site. Moreover, some projects simply need to be built along a faster timeline than is typically feasible for a traditional construction project. Thankfully, there exists a solution for those seeking to drastically reduce construction times: modular construction.

© Jesus Granada
© Jesus Granada
© Dennis Lo
© Dennis Lo

What does ‘modular construction’ mean exactly?

Per the Modular Building Institute, the foremost resource on the topic, “modular construction is a process in which a building is constructed off-site, under controlled plant conditions, using the same materials and designing to the same codes and standards as conventionally built facilities – but in about half the time.” Modular construction is also a bit of an umbrella term that includes a couple of different types of construction:

  • Volumetric modular construction (preferred by the Modular Building Institute) is a process in which entire rooms or sections of rooms—complete with walls, floors, and ceilings—are built in a factory setting and then transported to a final site for assembly. This type of construction is used for both permanent and relocatable modular projects (buildings that aren’t designed to be moved versus those that are; think a hotel versus a temporary classroom).
  • Panelized construction is a process in which interior and/or exterior wall panels are built in a factory setting and then transported to and arranged on the building site. The rest of the building is constructed on-site.
Courtesy of Modular Building Institute (MBI)
Courtesy of Modular Building Institute (MBI)
Courtesy of Modular Building Institute (MBI)
Courtesy of Modular Building Institute (MBI)

What are the benefits of modular construction compared to traditional construction methods? Is it really cost-saving? 

Modular construction certainly can save costs, but that isn’t its primary benefit. The primary benefit of modular construction is time saving and faster return on investment. Since modular construction allows for industrialized assembly that happens concurrently with site preparation, the total time it takes to build a structure can be dramatically reduced. Often by the time the site is ready (foundation levelled, plumbing in place, concrete poured, etc.) the factory-built modules are ready to be placed. A modularly-built hotel, for example, can open its doors and start generating revenue 30%-50% sooner than a traditionally-built hotel.

Other benefits include greater worker safety (workers are all working in a safe, controlled environment as opposed to working at precarious heights and/or in less controlled environments), improved productivity, increased schedule certainty (late change orders and weather delays are greatly minimized with modular construction), and improved cost predictability.

© Amy Barkow
© Amy Barkow
Courtesy of Modular Building Institute (MBI)
Courtesy of Modular Building Institute (MBI)

Is modular construction sustainable?

Modular construction is considered a more sustainable option than traditional construction methods for a few reasons:

  • Greater flexibility and reuse. Modular buildings can be disassembled and the modules relocated or refurbished for new use, reducing the demand for raw materials and minimizing the amount of energy expended to meet the new need. 
  • Less material waste. When building in a factory, waste is eliminated by recycling materials, controlling inventory, and protecting building materials. 
  • Improved air quality. Because the modular structure is substantially completed in a factory-controlled setting using dry materials, the potential for high levels of moisture being trapped in the new construction is eliminated.
© Jan Bitter
© Jan Bitter
Courtesy of Modular Building Institute (MBI)
Courtesy of Modular Building Institute (MBI)

Can it be used for any type of building? In which cases is it convenient to choose modular construction rather than traditional methods?

Any type of building can be built modularly. But to do so, the building has to be conceived of and designed as such. Modular construction is often chosen when time is of the essence or space is at a premium. For example, in Europe, urban lots are very often constrained by roads and other buildings, so building traditionally (bringing materials and workers onsite for an extended period of time) can be prohibitive. With modular construction, you need a crane and far less personnel to erect the building in less time. And, in tight urban locations, the reduction of noise pollution is an added benefit.

Courtesy of Ola Roald Arkitektur
Courtesy of Ola Roald Arkitektur
Courtesy of Modular Building Institute (MBI)
Courtesy of Modular Building Institute (MBI)

What are the specific technical requirements to adopt it? For example, are there security requirements or design constraints?

Whereas traditional construction can be a more fluid process wherein design changes are introduced even after construction has begun (often causing delays), modular construction requires design professionals to collaborate and complete their work upfront. It’s during this process that modular construction—permanent modular construction, most notably—usually relies on advanced BIM to assess energy performance and identify the most cost-effective efficiency measures. The designs are then turned over to the manufacturer for industrialized prefabrication and construction.

© Guilherme Jordani
© Guilherme Jordani

As far as design constraints, modular buildings are built to the same building codes and specifications as traditional buildings and are virtually indistinguishable from their “stick-built” counterparts. From single-family homes to multi-story office buildings, modular construction can be used anywhere.

Rethinking Embassy Design: Building Diplomacy Around the World

Rethinking Embassy Design: Building Diplomacy Around the World, © Michel Denancé
© Michel Denancé

The architecture of diplomacy balances security and openness. As symbols of protection and representation, embassies are built for utility in both urban and rural contexts alike. At their core, they are also made to communicate the values and ideals of nations as welcoming structures and sustainable civic spaces. Today, modern embassy projects are made to meet rigorous security standards while embracing local culture and conditions.

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© Gijo Paul George
© Gijo Paul George

Our contemporary understanding of diplomacy has its roots in mid-15th century Italy. The Milanese sent representatives to other Italian city states, and their accommodations became the precursors to embassy compounds and consulate buildings. The first purpose-built embassies were in Constantinople during the early 19th century, and over time, the architecture of diplomacy has been carried out across multiple buildings and structures, from residences to chanceries. The structures are also usually open with services to the general public. The following projects explore embassy architecture, renovations and consulate designs over the last ten years as secure facilities and symbols alike.

Dutch Embassy in Amman / Rudy Uytenhaak + Partners Architecten

© Pieter Kers
© Pieter Kers

Amman is a fast-growing city entirely made up of buildings in local natural stone: not only established neighborhoods, but also poorer districts, and not only homes, but also offices, hotels, museums and shops. The Dutch embassy project involved the renovation of an understated villa within a walled garden.

Embassy Ethiopia / Bjarne Mastenbroek and Dick Van Gameren

© Christian Richters
© Christian Richters

The compound of the Dutch Embassy consists of a five-hectare wooded area that slopes steeply towards the city. The design task was to situate the five buildings in the compound while retaining the site’s landscape. The horizontal volume of the main building cuts into the hill with the sloping terrain naturally divides it into two programmatic units; the ambassador’s residence and the chancellery.

Turkish Embassy in Berlin / NSH Architekten

© Bernardette Grimmenstein
© Bernardette Grimmenstein

In 2007, an international two-stage competition was launched for the Turkish Embassy in Berlin. A basic concept consisting of the building floor plans and two images was requested in the first phase. This embassy design was developed with a team of ten people in addition to the three partners.

Embassy of Ecuador / Arquiteck & Asociados

© Andrés Valbuena
© Andrés Valbuena

The building for the Embassy of the Republic of Ecuador in Colombia aims to provide through the architecture an image capable of expressing new diplomatic relations between the two countries. The architectural proposal is developed on a corner plot previously occupied by a house in the 1980s, in which the Embassy worked until it was moved for the new construction.

Embassy of France and French Institute in Jakarta / Segond-Guyon Architects

© Jerome Ricolleau
© Jerome Ricolleau

The French Embassy is established in Jakarta since 1975, along the prestigious avenue of Jalan Thamrin. This project for the new diplomatic campus comes from the will to bring together all diplomatic and cultural French services in Jakarta at a single location. The project was designed to provide a simple, readable architecture.

Swiss Embassy / LOCALARCHITECTURE

© Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

Until the summer of 2015, the Swiss Confederation was represented in Côte d’Ivoire by an embassy located in Abidjan’s Plateau district. The Office Fédéral des Constructions et de la Logistique acquired the former residence of the Norwegian ambassador in the city’s Cocody district, planning to renovate and extend the existing building in order to house its new embassy there.

Embassy of Egypt / PROMONTORIO

© João Morgado
© João Morgado

Located in Lisbon’s affluent quarter of Restelo, the new Embassy of Egypt stands on a plot in Avenida Dom Vasco da Gama which is typologically characterized by a string of large free-standing villas of the 1940s and 50s, many of which have been gradually been converted into diplomatic residences.

French Embassy in Haiti / Explorations Architecture

© Michel Denancé
© Michel Denancé

The new French Embassy of Haiti consists of one circular structure in a large park. The design is inspired by the tropical architecture of several periods, and is made in respect of the memory of the land where it takes place. The pavilion was built with light steel and a wood frame with facades that filter views and protect from local site conditions.

Embassy of Finland in New Delhi Renovation / ALA Architects

© Tuomas Uusheimo
© Tuomas Uusheimo

The sculptural roofs – the most significant architectural feature of this embassy compound – resemble the forms of the snowy Lake Kitkajärvi near Kuusamo in Northern Finland. ALA Architects was commissioned in 2013 to design the renovation

Mushroom Buildings? The Possibilities of Using Mycelium in Architecture

Mushroom Buildings? The Possibilities of Using Mycelium in Architecture, © Dmytro Ostapenko (shutterstock)
© Dmytro Ostapenko (shutterstock)

Fungi are everywhere. In the air, in the water, in our bodies, in the trees, in the ceilings of our bathrooms, underground. They can be mushrooms (edible, medicinal, hallucinogenic, or very poisonous), or take other simpler forms, such as molds. They can trigger illnesses, but they can also produce antibiotic remedies, such as penicillin, or help ferment amazing cheeses and breads. Could they also be the future of packaging and building materials?

Ecovative Mushroom® Insulation . Image Cortesia de Ecovative
Ecovative Mushroom® Insulation . Image Cortesia de Ecovative

Fungi are nature’s primary recyclers. They produce enzymes that aid in the degradation of organic matter, transforming it into minerals. Typically, these life forms grow best in shaded and humid environments. Like an iceberg, the visible portion of a fungus only represents a small fraction of it. Below the surface, for example, mushrooms develop long thread-like roots called mycelium. These are extremely thin white filaments that develop in all directions, forming a quickly-growing complex web. When the fungus is implanted in a suitable place, the mycelium behaves like glue, cementing the substrate and transforming it into a solid block. This substrate can be composed of sawdust, ground wood, straw, various agricultural residues, or other similar materials, which might otherwise go to waste.

Shell Mycelium Pavillion / BEETLES 3.3 and Yassin Areddia Designs. Image © Krishna & Govind Raja
Shell Mycelium Pavillion / BEETLES 3.3 and Yassin Areddia Designs. Image © Krishna & Govind Raja

Depending on the mycelium strain and the substrate used, the final product can be molded to produce insulating panels, furniture, accessories, fabrics, packaging materials, and even bricks, with good thermal and acoustic characteristics and strong fire behavior. Scientific research [1] has shown that, in terms of physical and mechanical characteristics, mycelium-based materials resemble expanded polystyrene (often called Styrofoam), but with an improved level of biodegradability. “In addition to the lignocellulosic substrate, the characteristics of a mycelium-based biocomposite are strongly affected by the selected fungus species and their continuous growth. Thus, the consistency of the mycelium itself is, in turn, affected by the composition and structure of the substrate.”

Ecovative Design is a pioneer of mycelium-based design today, using this unconventional material to create objects such as packaging. To produce these objects, the substrate and fungi are combined in a solution and inserted into molds. After about 5 days of growth in favorable conditions – adequate temperature, humidity, and light – the material is solidified into the desired shape. The object then goes into an oven to completely deactivate the microorganisms present, allowing it be used as common packaging. Companies as large as IKEA and DELL have already begun using these packages, which are completely biodegradable.

Cortesia de Arup
Cortesia de Arup

The Living studio in New York worked in cooperation with Ecovative Design on the Hy-Fi Project, a pavilion that was built in the yard of MoMA PS1 after winning the MoMA’s Young Architects Program in 2014. With ARUP’s structural advice, mycelium bricks were developed, which grew in less than a week in prismatic molds from the residue of chopped corn stalks. When constructed, the bricks formed a tower about 12 meters high. At the end of the two-month exhibition, the tower was dismantled and the bricks were taken to composters, taking advantage of their natural biodegradability.https://www.youtube.com/embed/c6nurN-Hii8?theme=light&showinfo=0&color=white

Hy-Fi Pavilion / The Living. Image © Andrew Nunes
Hy-Fi Pavilion / The Living. Image © Andrew Nunes
Hy-Fi Pavilion / The Living. Image © Andrew Nunes
Hy-Fi Pavilion / The Living. Image © Andrew Nunes

Carlo Ratti Associati, working in collaboration with the energy company Eni, developed an architectural structure made of mushrooms that was revealed at Milan Design Week. The “Circular Garden” is a series of arches composed of one kilometer of mycelium, wherein the spores were injected into an organic material to start the growth process. As many pavilions for temporary exhibitions generate a significant amount of waste, Jardim Circular follows a more sustainable course, with its constitutive mushrooms, ropes, and shredded wood chips returned to the ground after the end of the exhibition. The Shell Mycelium Pavillion, a collaboration between BEETLES 3.3 and Yassin Areddia Designs, similarly demonstrates alternative eco-conscious design through temporary structures. A wooden structure was covered with coconut marrow that contained the fungus. After a few days of care, the mycelium grew and formed a snow cover over the structure. The upper layer of growth died and hardened due to sunlight, forming a shell and protecting the lower layers.

The Circular Garden / Carlo Ratti Associati. Image © Marco Beck Peccoz
The Circular Garden / Carlo Ratti Associati. Image © Marco Beck Peccoz

In addition to architectural structures, mycelium also has potential for use in thermal and acoustic insulation. According to another initiative by Ecovative, live mushrooms packaged between wooden panels can form an effective insulating wall. In three days, the mycelium grows and solidifies loose particles to create airtight insulation, simultaneously adhering to the wooden boards and forming what is essentially an extremely strong sandwich. The result is similar to a structural insulating panel, but without thermal bridges. According to Ecovative, after about a month the mushroom insulation naturally dries out and becomes inactive.

Ecovative Mushroom® Insulation . Image Cortesia de Ecovative
Ecovative Mushroom® Insulation . Image Cortesia de Ecovative
Ecovative Mushroom® Insulation . Image Cortesia de Ecovative
Ecovative Mushroom® Insulation . Image Cortesia de Ecovative

But European researchers in the fields of computing, biology, and architecture [2] go a step further. They propose to develop a structural substrate using live fungal mycelium, together with nanoparticles and polymers, to make mycelium-based electronics through the implementation of sensory fusion and fungal decision making. “Mycelium networks will be computationally active, giving rise to entirely new biologically-based features for architectural artifacts and materials, such as self-regulation, adaptation, decision-making, growth, and autonomous repair – adding new advantages and value to architectural artifacts and the environment, and providing a radically alternative paradigm to state of the art ‘smart buildings’ that rely heavily on technical infrastructure. ”

Shell Mycelium Pavillion / BEETLES 3.3 and Yassin Areddia Designs. Image © Krishna & Govind Raja
Shell Mycelium Pavillion / BEETLES 3.3 and Yassin Areddia Designs. Image © Krishna & Govind Raja

Although we can gather some examples of initiatives in one article, the use of mycelium has still barely scratched the surface of its potential. Scientific articles on the subject almost always conclude with the statement: it is necessary to research heavily and experiment carefully with the material for it to have the efficiency, competitiveness, and industrial quality needed for mass use. But researchers also agree that there is enormous potential for the material in many diverse areas. Mycelium represents a paradigm shift in the way we approach the procurement, use, and disposal of construction materials. Being 100% biodegradable, found in abundance on the planet, “grown” from waste, and achieving excellent functional characteristics, mycelium-based materials have enormous, yet untapped potential. But, above all, mycelium also proves that great innovations do not necessarily require new technologies or complex materials. They may be closer than we think.

Notes

[1] Yangang Xing, Matthew Brewer, Hoda El-Gharabawy, Gareth Griffith and Phil Jones. Growing and testing mycelium bricks as building insulation materials. Earth and Environmental Science 121 (2018)
[2] Andrew Adamatzky, Phil Ayres, Gianluca Belotti, and Han Wösten. Fungal architecturearXiv:1912.13262

Interior door Filomuro: tinteggiabile a soffitto rovere tabacco

CHARACTERISTICS

Type: interior

Opening: systemswing

Material: wooden

Glazing: without glazing

Other characteristics: full-height, flush

DESCRIPTION

Flush-fit, clean lines, pure linear continuity. The choice of a Filomuro door may be dictated by various furnishing needs: keeping the minimal aesthetics of a space unaltered; making passageways to secondary rooms, like pantries or storage closets, less visible; allowing special decorative motifs on large surfaces to continue on door element to complete the interior decor.

Herzog & de Meuron’s shopping center development in Basel will be topped with a middle school

Image courtesy of Herzog & de Meuron.
Image courtesy of Herzog & de Meuron.

After winning the competition for a massive urban redevelopment project in their hometown of Basel in 2017, Swiss architects Herzog & de Meuron now released updated material that shows a more refined and detailed concept. 

The Dreispitz Nord scheme seeks to transform a former customs depot into a mixed-use urban district, expanding the reach of downtown Basel.

Image courtesy of Herzog & de Meuron.

“The urban proposal for Dreispitz Nord is based on what would seem to be the paradoxical aim of developing and increasing density, while simultaneously creating large, public green spaces,” explains a statement put out by the architects. 

“Density is achieved by three high-rise towers and an open perimeter block of individual, tightly spaced mid-rise buildings. This block frames a publicly accessible park in contrast to the perimeter blocks in Gundeldingen with their primarily private inner courtyards.”

Image courtesy of Herzog & de Meuron.

One of the key features to achieve useful densification is a middle school for 600 students that will sit on top of the development’s central shopping center, a move that Basel city authorities in collaboration with the client and developers announced last month: “The location of the school and a multipurpose gymnasium on the elevated Adele Duttweiler Field is ideal. In the evenings the gymnasium and playing fields can be used by sports clubs and associations, and for many other activities as well. The school’s athletic and recreation areas will occupy only part of the entire field. Gardens and other outdoor areas will be accessible to the residents of Gundeldingen and public at all times.”

The zoning plan is scheduled to be presented to the cantonal legislative in mid-2021.

Removable partition LINE

CHARACTERISTICS

Type: removable, modular

Material: glazed

Applications: for offices

Other characteristics: transparent

DESCRIPTION

Compact and solid ,both in appearance and substance, LINE is a versatile partition wall with vertical modules that fit well in any type of setting and can be easily integrated in all the other systems proposed by Ge Giussani. Extremely flexible system, both in terms of size and materials. Modules completely solid, mixed modules with solid and glass panes in various sizes. LINE meets the various needs of users as regards as organization and functional changes in the working environments. It is characterized by an inner metal structure and a double paneling with vertical modularity .Essential elements of the system: modules with internal bearing structure ,with vertical uprights and horizontal stringers on which the double chipboard panels 18 mm thick , the aluminum profiles and the double glazing are fixed, one on each side.

Fentress Global Challenge Announces Winners of the 2020 Airport of the Future Global Student Design Competition

Fentress Global Challenge Announces Winners of the 2020 Airport of the Future Global Student Design Competition, First Place: BANIYA, The Green Gateway, Southern California Institute of Architecture. Image Courtesy of Fentress Global Challenge
First Place: BANIYA, The Green Gateway, Southern California Institute of Architecture. Image Courtesy of Fentress Global Challenge

Fentress Global Challenge (FGC), an annual international student design competition, launched in 2011 by Fentress Architects, has released its results for the 2020 edition. Reimagining airport mobility in the year 2100 for one of the 20 busiest airports in the world, this year’s contest gathered over 100 submissions from students in over 15 countries. The winning project, “the Green Gateway” is a zero-emission, highly sustainable multimodal hub.

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The Fentress Global Challenge (FGC), is an annual global student design competition by Fentress Architects that represents the firm’s commitment to advancing innovative design in public architecture and attracts students from around the world. Since its inception in 2011, thousands of entries from over 75 countries have competed for top honors.

A deep passion for design and a creative mindset are the cornerstone of any successful design competition submission. Each year, the submissions we receive are more innovative, spirited and dynamic than the prior year, which shows an exciting outlook for the future of terminal design. We’re greatly impressed by this year’s winners and every submission we received. — Curtis Fentress, FAIA, RIBA, Principal in Charge of Design at Fentress Architects.

Challenging participants to envision airport mobility in the year 2100, the 2020 edition gathered proposals that introduced “a diverse spectrum of design concepts to improve the airport passenger terminal building, addressing the key factors such as futuristic transportation technologies, urbanization, globalization, technology, flexibility, security, project feasibility, and passenger experience”. Read on to discover the winning entries and their descriptions.

First Place

BANIYA, The Green Gateway

Southern California Institute of Architecture

First Place: BANIYA, The Green Gateway, Southern California Institute of Architecture. Image Courtesy of Fentress Global Challenge
First Place: BANIYA, The Green Gateway, Southern California Institute of Architecture. Image Courtesy of Fentress Global Challenge

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The winning concept, designed by Nikhil Bang and Kaushal Tatiya from the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc), transforms Indira Gandhi International Airport into a forward-thinking, sustainable multimodal hub that mitigates the enivironmental impacts of air travel while enhancing mobility across New Delhi, India—one of the most populated and polluted cities in the world. The design, dubbed “the Green Gateway,” proposes a future where airports are more than buildings; they provide a seamless connection to the cultural context of the site, from their planning to their form and materiality.

Embracing sustainable design strategies, the zero-emission concept features a decentralized system of one central terminal and six towers dispersed throughout the city. The towers provide a dual purpose, working as both air-purifying centers and stations for flying cars. This solution significantly improves mobility across the city by replacing domestic flights as one of the major sources of pollution. The students’ submission describes the airport’s design as “zero-emission at the macro and micro level, improving mobility across the city by replacing domestic flight as one of the major sources of pollution and making air travel a personal affair.”

Second Place

Sejkul, Hartsfield International Drive-In Airport

University of Ljubljana, Slovenia

Second Place: Sejkul, Hartsfield International Drive-In Airport, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. Image Courtesy of Fentress Global Challenge
Second Place: Sejkul, Hartsfield International Drive-In Airport, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. Image Courtesy of Fentress Global Challenge

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What does travel and transportation look like in 2100? According to second-place winner Dušan Sekulic—a student at the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia—fully autonomous pods, driving chairs, AI-powered navigation, and vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircraft will be key ingredients to designing the next-gen airport experience. The concept proposes reimagining Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL)—the busiest airport in the world—as a drive-in airport where travelers’ individual pods and driving chairs bring them directly to the aircraft. Playing off of Atlanta’s reputation as a “city in the forest,” the new ATL will feature a green design approach, merging the airport with the city’s skyline to create an “airport in the forest.”

Third Place

W.A.D, Floating Aero City

Beijing Jiaotong University

Third Place: W.A.D, Floating Aero City, Beijing Jiaotong University. Image Courtesy of Fentress Global Challenge
Third Place: W.A.D, Floating Aero City, Beijing Jiaotong University. Image Courtesy of Fentress Global Challenge

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This year’s third-place winner responded to an ever-important reality: how airport design can prepare airports located in high density seaside cities to adapt to the effects of climate change. Floating Aero City, designed by Yuanxiang Chan, Chaofan Zhang, and Zhuangzhuang King from Beijing Jiaotong University, provides a highly visionary approach to sustainable design. Located in Hong Kong, the airport responds to the site’s subtropical climate conditions and high density issues. Floating on Hong Kong’s ocean, the airport’s three-dimensional, moveable platform reduces the impact on the natural terrain while increasing available land. The structure’s vertical form significantly reduces the time it takes passengers to flow from check-in to boarding, enhancing the overall passenger experience. Sustainable design strategies include daylighting, tidal power generation, a circular runway and hydrogen-powered aircraft.

#1 People’s Choice Award

Arch Yi Yang, The Vertebrae

University of Malaya

#1 People’s Choice Award: Arch Yi Yang, The Vertebrae, University of Malaya. Image Courtesy of Fentress Global Challenge
#1 People’s Choice Award: Arch Yi Yang, The Vertebrae, University of Malaya. Image Courtesy of Fentress Global Challenge

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The Vertebrae, designed by Yi Yang Chai and Sharon Cho from the University of Malaya, won the #1 People’s Choice Award with more than 6,200 public votes. The biophilic design harmonizes the built environment with nature to create a “garden city”—the future airport archetype that forms a contextual representation of its culture. Located in Singapore, the concept infuses a biophilic and sustainable approach into every element of the design to renvision the airport as a model of sustainability while amplifying the country’s national identity.“This is a beautiful concept with a strong connection to existing structures and attention to the environment,” said Lois Kramer, a 2020 FGC Juror and CEO at KRAMER aerotek inc. “The design is resilient in how it addresses air pollution and possibility of evolving modes of transportation.”

#2 People’s Choice Award

RIE, O’Pon the Hill

Yogyakarta University of Technology

#2 People’s Choice Award: RIE, O’Pon the Hill, Yogyakarta University of Technology. Image Courtesy of Fentress Global Challenge
#2 People’s Choice Award: RIE, O’Pon the Hill, Yogyakarta University of Technology. Image Courtesy of Fentress Global Challenge

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Garnering over 5,900 public votes, O’Pon the Hill Airport landed the #2 People’s Choice Award. Designed by Ridwan Arifin, Imaduddin Dhia Ul-Fath and Ervin Dwiratno from Yogyakarta University of Technology, the concept blends culture, history and technology to envision the future of O’Hare International Airport. This futuristic terminal features a Smart Air Pad to accommodate vertical take-off and landing. Equipped with nanotechnology, the Smart Air Pad examines the performance of aircraft. Additionally, People Mover Pods move passengers throughout the terminal, enhancing circulation and the overall passenger experience.

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