Creating Vertical Gardens and Green Facades with Steel Cables

With the high population density of cities and voracious appetite of the market for every square meter, it is not uncommon for urban vegetation to be forgotten. For this reason, forests, vegetable gardens, and vertical gardens have aroused much interest and figured into a variety of different innovative proposals. Using the vertical plane to maintain plants in an urban setting is a coherent and common-sense solution, especially when there is little possibility of bringing green to the level of the people on the streets.

Greenpeace Brasil / +K Arquitetos. Image © Ana MelloCortesia de JakobCortesia de JakobImages courtesy of Frasers Property Australia and Sekisui House Australia. Image © Simon Wood+ 22

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Centro Comunitário em Poggio Picenze / Burnazzi Feltrin Architetti. Image © Carlo Baroni

Centro Comunitário em Poggio Picenze / Burnazzi Feltrin Architetti. Image © Carlo Baroni
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Greenpeace Brasil / +K Arquitetos. Image © Ana Mello

Greenpeace Brasil / +K Arquitetos. Image © Ana Mello

Vertical vegetation works as more than just an aesthetic adornment. Plants block a part of the solar radiation that hits a building’s surfaces, making indoor spaces cooler and reducing the need for air conditioners. This measure can save electrical energy by 30% due to evaporative cooling and shading [1]. In front of a blind gable, plants can lower the temperature of the masonry, reducing heat gains, while over an opening, it can filter sunlight that would enter the space. Deciduous vegetation options are an interesting possibility as well, allowing solar radiation to enter in the winter bur stopping it in the summer. In addition to making the air quality better, the leaves also absorb sound (research shows a decrease of up to 5 dB) and reduce discomfort due to unwanted external noise. Finally, it allows the facade to change its colors periodically, with blossoms attracting bees and other insects that are important for the environment and food production.

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Produtora Kana / AR Arquitetos. Image © Pedro Kok

Produtora Kana / AR Arquitetos. Image © Pedro Kok
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Casa que respira / VTN Architects. Image © Hiroyuki Oki

Casa que respira / VTN Architects. Image © Hiroyuki Oki

Some vertical garden systems use felt pockets, where the substrate is inserted and the roots of the plants develop. In others urban garden typologies, masonry blocks or other façade elements simply leave space for the development of foliage.

But a very simple way to grow an urban garden is to use climbing plants with metal grids and cables where the plants cling to and grow, creating a vertical vegetation cover. The design is quite simple. There are usually small stalls, where substrates are inserted for plant roots to develop. A light structure of galvanized metal or stainless steel, resistant to weather and corrosion, is usually spaced between 5 and 20 cm from the facade, allowing the plant to grow with an ample amount of free space.

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Images courtesy of Frasers Property Australia and Sekisui House Australia. Image © Simon Wood

Images courtesy of Frasers Property Australia and Sekisui House Australia. Image © Simon Wood
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Cortesia de Jakob

Cortesia de Jakob

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Green Facades
Jakob
Wall system, where climbing plants or cascading groundcovers are trained to cover specially designed supporting structures. See more

It is important to note that each species of vine requires different kinds of support, allowing it to develop in the most effective way. There are species that cling to the surface without any support, while others curl up through the stem, leaves, or even through the thorns. Therefore, it is essential to research the desired plant species, learn whether it adapts well to the local climate and chosen facade, and as a result develop the solution that best suits it.

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Cortesia de Jakob

Cortesia de Jakob
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Edifício Residencial e Hotel Stadthaus M1 / Barkow Leibinger. Image © Ina Reinecke

Edifício Residencial e Hotel Stadthaus M1 / Barkow Leibinger. Image © Ina Reinecke

In the gallery below, see a collection of projects that use this method to create green facades through grids and steel cables:

Notes
[1] https://www.jakob.com/ch-en/applications/details/greening

Proofread by Lilly Cao

CLASSIC KITCHEN / LACQUERED WOOD / ISLAND / WITH HANDLES FORTUNA GOLD BY LUCIANO DAL BELLO

classic kitchen / lacquered wood / island / with handles

Characteristics

  • Style:

    classic

  • Material…:

    lacquered wood

  • Configuration:

    island

  • Other characteristics:

    with handles

Description

Fortuna Gold is a collection of classic furniture designed by Luciano Dal Bello for GD Arredamenti, in 18th Century Venetian style.
On top of Venice’s “Dogana da Mar”, the old customs building, two “atlases” are on their knees supporting a golden sphere holding the “Statua della Fortuna” (Statue of Fortune). The rich architecture of the buildings overlooking the statue has inspired the sophisticated, stylish details of this collection, full of history and age-old expertise.
The collection, made from Lime wood and characterised by its pillar decorations, goes perfectly with the gold leaf, especially if lacquered and aged.
The Fortuna Gold collection can be used to create bespoke kitchens, living room furniture, bookcases and wooden panelling.

Yona Friedman, French Architect and Urban Planner Passes Away at 96

Courtesy of Yona Friedman

Best known for his theory of mobile architecture and his spatial city project, Yona Friedman has passed away at 96, as was announced in his Instagram account this morning. The Hungarian born French architect and theorist was one of the most influential figures of the profession in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

Courtesy of Yona FriedmanCourtesy of Yona FriedmanCourtesy of Yona FriedmanCourtesy of Yona Friedman+ 9

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Courtesy of Yona Friedman

Courtesy of Yona Friedman

His breakthrough work “Ville Spatiale”, or spatial city released in 1958, was an enormous superstructure that could span over existing cities and would allow people to construct their own habitats within the larger framework. Featured in his manifesto “L’Architecture Mobile”, or mobile architecture, this utopian project recycled structures of existing cities.

A lifelong advocate for playful architecture, Friedman has always praised the idea of people’s architecture, as well as the notion of “people living in homes that they design themselves”. His most important contribution to the field remains his “Ville Spatiale” visualizations. Friedman’s pioneering way of expressing his architectural thoughts through collages and drawings became very characteristic of his epoch.


Related Article

A Selection of the Most Representative Drawings by Yona Friedman


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Courtesy of Yona Friedman

Courtesy of Yona Friedman

Architecture for people proposes a variant of the original “Ville Spatial.” It is based on a structure easy to modify, a structure not necessarily raised over the ground level, keeping that option open if wanted. — Yona Friedman

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Courtesy of Yona Friedman

Courtesy of Yona Friedman

Moreover, the architect had often discussed the contemporary city and its challenges. He was a firm believer that “it is the responsibility of architects to design structures that can be inhibited for the widest range of individuals and purposes”.

With a life-long experience, Yona Friedman participated in countless architectural events like the Venice Biennial and the Shanghai Biennial, had his installations and interventions showcased in the biggest institutions like Rome’s MAXXI Museum and taught at the most prestigious universities including MIT, Princeton, Harvard, and Columbia universities.

Sculptural Mixed-Use Complex Designed for Suburban Queensland

Design practice Conrad Gargett have created a proposal for a sculptural mixed-use complex in the Brisbane suburbs of Queensland, Australia. Sited in Lutwyche, the project aims to become an integrated development built to accommodate an ageing population in Queensland. Dubbed Lamington Markets, the design overlays public amenities and commercial spaces with local recreation space.

Lamington Markets. Image Courtesy of Doug and WolfLamington Markets. Image Courtesy of Doug and WolfLamington Markets. Image Courtesy of Doug and WolfLamington Markets. Image Courtesy of Doug and Wolf+ 5

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Lamington Markets. Image Courtesy of Doug and Wolf

Lamington Markets. Image Courtesy of Doug and Wolf
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Lamington Markets. Image Courtesy of Doug and Wolf

Lamington Markets. Image Courtesy of Doug and Wolf

As Conrad Gargett states, the development idea began as a typical transit-oriented mixed-use development, incorporating market retail, SoHo housing, cinemas, commercial spaces, and residential apartment mix. The development caught the attention of retirement living operators, and transformed to address a gap in accommodation options for seniors in the local region. The apartments are sized and planned to universal design requirements, ensuring circulation spaces and accessibility for the mobility-challenged; they can also be easily retrofitted with home support fixtures to allow ageing-in-place. The Lamington Markets building includes two residential towers atop the commercial complex below.

A development application for Lamington Markets has been submitted with Brisbane City Council.

News via Conrad Gargett

CLASSIC KITCHEN / ASH / ISLAND / ECOLOGICAL IMPERIAL

classic kitchen / ash / island / ecological

Characteristics

  • Style:

    classic

  • Material…:

    ash

  • Configuration:

    island

  • Other characteristics:

    ecological, lacquered, with handles

Description

A hand-carved treasure, pure elegance
Every kitchen is characterized by a craft-made that distinguishes the uniqueness of this model. Finishes and materials bring your mind back to smooth and velvety surfaces to feel,whose style is interpreted in a modern key. The programme is plenty of models, from the lacquer version with golden finishes, to the ash wood version with burgundy red, sky-blue, carbon, white or off-white paintings. Imperial also includes different matt lacquer versions in different finishes, such as patinated, antique and vintage; fine gold and silver decorations are also available. All the ornamental elements are decorated by hand in imperial style; some of them are capitals, cornices, hoods, cymas.
DETAILS
Imperial is a combination of tradition, passion and design where natural elements, as stones, are melted with artisan ornaments

IwamotoScott Selected to Design a New Ivy Tech Building in Columbus, Indiana

Ivy Tech and Cummins have selected IwamotoScott Architecture of San Francisco to create the new Ivy Tech Columbus campus building. The College anticipates breaking ground in 2020 and taking occupancy in 2022.

Courtesy of IwamotoScottCourtesy of IwamotoScottCourtesy of IwamotoScottCourtesy of IwamotoScott+ 9

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Courtesy of IwamotoScott

Courtesy of IwamotoScott
 

Ivy Tech Community College, the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system, will have a new 80,000 square-foot structure to replace the aging Poling Hall. With a facility that caters to modern technology, collaboration, academics, student learning, and the College’s advanced programs in high-demand, highly rewarding careers, the latest addition is a $32 million investment.

Supported by a grant from the Cummins Foundation Architecture Program, Ivy Tech’s new main campus building will help provide “a modern learning environment to better serve students, employees, and employers”.

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Courtesy of IwamotoScott

Courtesy of IwamotoScott
 

The Cummins Foundation is thrilled to welcome the addition of IwamotoScott into Columbus’ design heritage. Architecture is woven into the fabric of the Columbus community and is symptomatic of a larger vision – an aspiration to achieve excellence. This is echoed in IwamotoScott’s innovation and collaborative design process, making spaces that are functional, distinctive and beautiful. — Mary Chandler, Vice President of Corporate Responsibility for Cummins and CEO of the Cummins Foundation.

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Courtesy of IwamotoScott

Courtesy of IwamotoScott
 

Chosen from five national firms, IwamotoScott Architecture works on different scales with projects ranging from art installations and interiors to buildings and cities. With previous clients including the University of California Berkley and the University of California San Francisco, the studio was selected for its visionary project that showcases “what the future of Ivy Tech in Columbus could look like”. Moreover, the architect of record will be CSO Architects, and the contractor will be Pepper Construction, both based in Indianapolis.

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Courtesy of IwamotoScott

Courtesy of IwamotoScott
 

Their concepts of how to use the available space for a modern and advanced campus were well received by our community and employees. We look forward to partnering with them to design this important educational facility that is welcoming to all, provides opportunities for everyone, and complements our community’s architectural legacy. — Dr. Steven Combs, Ivy Tech Columbus Chancellor

BRUUDA ARCHITECTS

 

Bruuda Architects is an architectural firm that sees itself at the cutting edge of practice. As to be expected of such a firm, they are part of the new wave of architectural offices that define themselves as globally positioned but locally situated in theory and practice of architecture.

In their case the locality of choice is Nigeria, with offices in Abuja, Port-Harcourt and head quartered in Lagos. They specialize in the use of modernist ideals generally, and afro-modernist techniques specifically, and their proper application to the Nigerian architectural landscape.

Over time, the local architectural scenery has evolved to incorporate various, borrowed/ foreign stylistic trends and movements, which has resulted in a very diverse, albeit identity-deficient architecture. Bruuda addresses this, as in much else, by going the opposite way; designing with firmly entrenched ideals following a general synthesis of functionalism and minimalism, but within an African context.

Case in point: The Fault Line/ Urban Fabric- Abuja. The Schatz park, an investment park located just behind Transcorp Hilton, was designed to closely mimic the tectonic plates running underneath the city; the park is a redefinition of the conventional typology of Urban Foci. A new ‘Quasi Aso Rock’ serving as a lightening rod attracting the people that constitute the urban fabric.

Procedural Design v12 x//414

Abuja, Nigeria

The Fault Line,

Urban Fabric

Though yet unbuilt a thorough review of their design process yields an understanding of a firm whose rigor and procedural methodology is borderline scientific.

 A look through several other projects, also showcases a clearly distinct style and almost no semblance whatsoever to the work we’ve grown accustomed to in the nation’s skyline.

A graduate of Columbia University with further degrees in advanced architectural design, managing partner, Yem Edozie jokes: “We’re disruptors…there tends to be standard recipes for architecture, but we at Bruuda architects generally prefer to work outside those guidelines. It’s an approach that is not typically seen here, because it is not so easily imitated. It’s impolite to speak of success… the work must speak for itself, always”

The downside to such an approach though is the ‘trademark similarity’ that has led to accusations of monotony and a lack of sympathy to site and context.

“Of course, there have been accusations from a lot of quarters, but we believe wholly in consistency. Context: Content: Concept; these are words used inter-changeably by many architects but truly understood by a rare few. We can, if we chose depart momentarily from our chosen methodology, but on the whole, our clientele love what we do and see our work as unique and in this regard we’ve been lucky. We don’t deliberately design to make our projects look different. No, we simply have a process and we instill in our team, to trust that process in every single building we do. Most times the buildings just look right.

Procedural Design v21 x//144

Lagos, Nigeria

Pitch Apartments,

Rythmic Elements

Follows on all these social media:

Twitter: @BRUUDAARCHITECTS

Facebook:BRUUDAARCHITECTS

Pinterest: ww.pinterest.com/Bruuda

Google plus: BRUUDAARCHITECTS

LinkedIn: BRUUDAARCHITECTS

Youtube: BRUUDABRIEF

Instagram:@BRUUDA

Website: http://www.bruudaarchitects.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONTEMPORARY HOTEL ROOM FURNITURE SET

contemporary hotel room furniture set

Characteristics

  • Style:

    contemporary

Description

SUPERIOR QUALITY ‘MADE IN ITALY’ FURNITURE FOR YOUR HOTEL
Adaptable, professional and welcoming, Mobilspazio furniture is perfect for an international clientele. Using solid and long-lasting material for more than 20 years, Mobilspazio has furnished hundreds of hotels worldwide, in diverse climates. Different shades and colours are used to recreate both classical and modern settings. Mobilspazio products are characterized by 38 mm thick, anti-scratch surfaces and are 100% Made in Italy.

MC A Creates Mixed-Use Statement Building with Green Oasis in Tirana, Albania

Mario Cucinella Architects (MC A) has just received the go-ahead for the Ekspozita Building, an urban oasis in the center of Tirana, Albania. Comprising commercial, residential and public amenity spaces, the 93m tall mixed-use statement building is scheduled for completion by 2023.

Courtesy of Mario Cucinella ArchitectsCourtesy of Mario Cucinella ArchitectsCourtesy of Mario Cucinella ArchitectsCourtesy of Mario Cucinella Architects+ 12

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Courtesy of Mario Cucinella Architects

Courtesy of Mario Cucinella Architects
 

With construction works starting in 2020, the Ekspozita Building takes on an unusual form with a partially encircled green space. Inspired by the lack of open areas in the city, MC A, an architectural firm with offices in Bologna and New York, has imagined a mixed-use development with a central green oasis.

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Courtesy of Mario Cucinella Architects

Courtesy of Mario Cucinella Architects
 

Generous planting to the residential upper floors enhances the sense of a green oasis, while the inward-facing balconies give a feeling of enclosure and protection from the busy city”. In order to generate more public spaces, the design proposed to cut off the angles of the plot. The green courtyard opens to the south, onto the tree-lined Blv Gergi Fishta, one of Tirana’s major roads. 24-story high, the building’s ground floor, occupying only 44% of the plot, will be used as a nursery/kindergarten.


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MCA and WASP Design TECLA, a 3D Printed Sustainable Habitat


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Courtesy of Mario Cucinella Architects

Courtesy of Mario Cucinella Architects
 

As the building rises upwards, it withdraws back into itself, creating the smaller footprints that are most suitable for residential use. A ‘notch’ in the rear of the building provides a diagonal route through, dividing the two sides of commercial development on the ground floor and offering permeability to the site. — Mario Cucinella Architects

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Courtesy of Mario Cucinella Architects

Courtesy of Mario Cucinella Architects
 

Fitting into a humid climate, the Ekspozita Building is highly insulated. Solar shading minimizes heat in the glazed building during summer times, while large terraces to the apartments act as passive solar regulators. With these strategies, the building aims to use 30% less energy than other, comparable developments.

National Railway Museum Central Hall Competition Reveals 5 Final Design Concepts

The National Railway Museum and Malcolm Reading Consultants revealed the final concepts for the new Central Hall, created by five small to medium-sized international and UK practices. Shortlisted in November 2019, the 5 teams include a collaboration between 6a architects from UK and OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen from Belgium, Atelier d’Architecture Philippe Prost from France, Carmody Groarke from the UK, Feilden Fowles from the UK, and Heneghan Peng Architects from Ireland.

Atelier d’Architecture Philippe Prost. Image © Malcolm Reading Consultants and the respective teams6a architects and OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen. Image © Malcolm Reading Consultants and the respective teamsFeilden Fowles. Image © Malcolm Reading Consultants and the respective teamsheneghan peng architects. Image © Malcolm Reading Consultants and the respective teams+ 11

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6a architects and OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen. Image © Malcolm Reading Consultants and the respective teams

6a architects and OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen. Image © Malcolm Reading Consultants and the respective teams

Located on a site dominated by railway heritage and infrastructure from the mid- to late-19th century, in proximity to the center of York, the museum is one of the most famous attractions in the UK. Scheduled for opening in 2025, in time for the gallery’s 50th anniversary, the proposed project will enhance the status of the existing structure that will become the world’s railway museum, with an estimated 1.2 million visitors annually.

In fact, the new 4,500 sqm Central Hall will “transform the visitor arrival experience with an appealing and compelling entrance space, integrating the museum estate for the first time in its history”. Hosting a 1,000 sqm gallery, the building will also showcase innovative technology and introduce the museum’s world-class collection.

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Feilden Fowles. Image © Malcolm Reading Consultants and the respective teams

Feilden Fowles. Image © Malcolm Reading Consultants and the respective teams

I am very pleased to share the five design concepts for our new Central Hall which will showcase our collection and future innovations from the rail industry in an inspirational, purpose-built gallery. […] I encourage people to visit and to share their feedback. Although the final designs are some way off, the winning team will go on to create the final building which will be the cultural focal point at the heart of York Central — Judith McNicol, Director of the National Railway Museum

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heneghan peng architects. Image © Malcolm Reading Consultants and the respective teams

heneghan peng architects. Image © Malcolm Reading Consultants and the respective teams

With a brief that requested the creation of an environmentally sustainable and contextually sensitive Central Hall, the finalist teams were able to develop their design, during 3 months after the selection process. In fact, they were chosen from a field of 76 entries, based only on their past experience and team composition.

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Carmody Groake. Image © Malcolm Reading Consultants and the respective teams

Carmody Groake. Image © Malcolm Reading Consultants and the respective teams

The Jury that will select the final winner consists of:

  • Dame Mary Archer DBE, (Chair), Chair of the Board of Trustees, Science Museum Group
  • Sir Ian Blatchford FSA, Director, and Chief Executive, Science Museum Group
  • Gitta Gschwendtner, Director, Gitta Gschwendtner Design Consultancy
  • Zoe Laughlin, Director, Institute of Making
  • Karen Livingstone, Director of Masterplan and Estate, Science Museum Group
  • Judith McNicol, Director, National Railway Museum
  • Michael Squire, Senior Partner, Squire and Partners
  • Malcolm Reading, Competition Director (Jury Adviser)
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Atelier d’Architecture Philippe Prost. Image © Malcolm Reading Consultants and the respective teams

Atelier d’Architecture Philippe Prost. Image © Malcolm Reading Consultants and the respective teams

I am thrilled with the responses from all the finalist teams, which have exceeded our expectations in their variety and imagination. […]All five have offered intriguing takes on form and materials which respond to the brief in different ways, ranging from curvilinear to rectilinear shapes; which are by turns, strongly colored, sensory and tactile. […] I am particularly pleased that all five teams have taken seriously our ambition to create a sustainable building, which will be open for all, and be part of the landscape of this historic site. — Karen Livingstone, Science Museum Group Director of Master plan and Estate

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Carmody Groake. Image © Malcolm Reading Consultants and the respective teams

Carmody Groake. Image © Malcolm Reading Consultants and the respective teams

On another hand, the public will be able to share his thoughts and ideas about the projects on display at an exhibition at York’s National Railway Museum, until Sunday 23 February. The winner of the Competition will be revealed in March 2020.

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