The World Architecture Festival Announces Day Two Winners

The World Architecture Festival Announces Day Two Winners, WOHA Architects - Kampung Admirality . Image © Patrick Bingham Hall

WOHA Architects – Kampung Admirality . Image © Patrick Bingham Hall

The 2018 World Architecture Festival has announced the second-day winners of this year’s edition, featuring works from such diverse firms as SeARCH, Sordo Madaleno, NextOffice, and Grimshaw.

The second day’s judging categories spanned a wide area, from future masterplanning visions to completed religious structures. The festival, held this year in Amsterdam, will culminate Friday 30 November with the World Building of the Year and Future Project of the Year Awards. These awards, selected from the festival’s list of category winners, will be selected by the festival’s “super jury”: Nathalie de Vries, Frederick Cooper Llosa, Lesley Lokko,Li Xiaodong, and Manuelle Gautrand.

Team V Architectuur - HAUT . Image The Student Hotel Experience Design Team - TSH Campus Barcelona. Image © Luis Beltran  Spheron Architects - Belarusian Memorial Chapel. Image © Joakim Boren Nikken Sekkei - Shanghai Greenland Center. Image © Yang Min + 12

The World Architecture Festival features three days of talks, panel discussions, keynotes, and project presentations, this year loosely centred around the concept of ‘Identity.’ Keynote speakers included Nathalie de Vries, Sir Peter Cook, Lesley Lokko, David Adjaye, and India Mahdavi, covering topics as diverse as the architectural styles of North Sea countries and the deeply personal nature of interior architecture.

The full list of WAF 2018’s day two winners below:

INSIDE Awards

Category: Residential and Creative Re-Use

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Very Studio / Che Wang Architects - Sunny Apartment.  Image © Te Fang Wang

Very Studio / Che Wang Architects – Sunny Apartment. Image © Te Fang Wang

Winner: Very Studio | Che Wang Architecture – Sunny Apartment, Taichung City, Taiwan

Highly Commended: studio mk27 – Francesc Macia 10 – FM 10, Barcelona Spain

Category: Hotels and Display

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The Student Hotel Experience Design Team - TSH Campus Barcelona. Image © Luis Beltran

The Student Hotel Experience Design Team – TSH Campus Barcelona. Image © Luis Beltran

Winner: The Student Hotel Experience Design Team – TSH Campus Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain

Highly Commended: JAC Studios, Yumin Art Nouveau Collection, Phoenix, Jeju, South Korea

Category: Civic, Culture & Transport and Bars & Restaurants

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BVN - Australian Embassy Bangkok. Image © John Gollings

BVN – Australian Embassy Bangkok. Image © John Gollings

Winner: BVN – Australian Embassy, Bangkok, Thailand

Highly Commended: Concrete – Harrison Urby, Entrance Cafe, Harrison, United States of America

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Concrete - Harrison Urby Entrance Cafe .Image © Ewout Huibers

Concrete – Harrison Urby Entrance Cafe .Image © Ewout Huibers

Completed Buildings

Category: Hotel and Leisure

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Courtesy of SeARCH. ImageSeARCH - Hotel Jakarta

Courtesy of SeARCH. ImageSeARCH – Hotel Jakarta

Winner: SeARCH – Hotel Jakarta, Javakade, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Category: Housing, Large Scale

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SANJAY PURI ARCHITECTS - The Street, Mathura, India. Image © Dinesh Mehta

SANJAY PURI ARCHITECTS – The Street, Mathura, India. Image © Dinesh Mehta

Winner: SANJAY PURI ARCHITECTS – The Street, Mathura, India

Highly Commended: WilkinsonEyre – Gasholders London, London, United Kingdom

Category: Religion and Shopping

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Nikken Sekkei - Shanghai Greenland Center. Image © Yang Min

Nikken Sekkei – Shanghai Greenland Center. Image © Yang Min

Winner: NIKKEN SEKKEI – Shanghai Greenland Center / Greenland Being Funny – Shanghai, China

Highly Commended: Foundry of Space [FOS] – MEGAbangna FOODWALK – Samutprakan, Thailand

Category: Religion

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 Spheron Architects - Belarusian Memorial Chapel. Image © Joakim Boren

Spheron Architects – Belarusian Memorial Chapel. Image © Joakim Boren

Winner: Spheron Architects – Belarusian Memorial Chapel, London, United Kingdom

Highly Commended: Fluid Motion Architects, Vali-e-asr Mosque, Tehran, Iran

Category: Health

Winner: (Temporary association) AAPROG – BOECKX- B2Ai – Hospital AZ Zeno, Knokke Belgium

Category: Higher Education and Research

Winner: Alison Brooks Architects – Exeter College Cohen Quadrangle, Oxford, United Kingdom

Category: House – Future Projects and School

Winner: nextoffice – Guyim Vault House

Category: Villa

Winner: KieranTimberlake – High Horse Ranch, Willits, United States of America

Highly Commended: John Wardle Architects – Captain Kelly’s Cottage, Bruny Island, Australia

Category: Transport

Winner: Grimshaw – London Bridge station, London, United Kingdom

Category: Mixed Use

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WOHA Architects - Kampung Admirality. Image © Darren Soh

WOHA Architects – Kampung Admirality. Image © Darren Soh

Winner: WOHA – Kampung Admiralty, Singapore, Singapore

Future Projects 

Category: Education

Winner: Warren and Mahoney Architects with Woods Bagot – Lincoln University and AgResearch Joint Facility, Christchurch, New Zealand

Category: Culture

Winner: Studio 44 Architects – Museum of the siege of Leningrad, St. Petersburg, Russia

Category: Masterplanning

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Sebastian Monsalve + Juan David Hoyos - Medellin River Parks Botanical Park Master Plan. Image © Sebastian Monsalve + Juan David Hoyos

Sebastian Monsalve + Juan David Hoyos – Medellin River Parks Botanical Park Master Plan. Image © Sebastian Monsalve + Juan David Hoyos

Winner: Sebastian Monsalve + Juan David Hoyos – Medellin River Parks / Botanical Park Master Plan, Medellin, Colombia

Highly Commended: Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios – Kirkstall Forge, Leeds, United Kingdom

Category: Commercial Mixed Use

Winner: Aedas – Commercial Bank Headquarters Mixed-Use Project, Taichung, Taiwan

Joint Highly Commended: NEUF architect(e)s The Mews, Toronto, Canada

Joint Highly Commended: TABANLIOGLU ARCHITECTS – Halic Shipyards, Istanbul, Turkey

Category: Residential

Winner:  Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos – Amelia Tulum

Highly Commended: Team V Architectuur – HAUT, Amsterdam, Netherlands

World Architecture Festival 2018 Category Winners

COMPLETED BUILDINGS:

Civic & Community
Winner: CHROFI with McGregor Coxall – Maitland Riverlink, Maitland, Australia


Highly Commended: Onearth Architecture – Macha Village Centre, Gansu Province, China

Culture 
Winner: Conrad Gargett – The Piano Mill, Stanthorpe, Australia

Highly Commended: BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group – TIRPITZ, Blåvand, Denmark

Display
Winner: Arkitema Architects and Professor Christoffer Harlang – Hammershus Visitor Centre, Allinge, Denmark


Highly Commended: studio mk27 – Micasa Vol.C, Sao Paulo, Brazil​

House
Winner: David Leech Architects – A house in a garden – 81 Hollybrook Grove, Dublin, Ireland


Highly Commended: Studio SA_e – Rumah Gerbong, South Tangerang, Indonesia

New & Old
Winner: Heatherwick Studio – Zeitz MOCAA, Cape Town, South Africa


Highly Commended: AHMM – University of Amsterdam

Office
Winner: INNOCAD Architecture – C&P Corporate Headquarters, Graz, Austria

Highly Commended: Kate Otten Architects – Law on Keyes, Johannesburg, South Africa
Highly Commended: stu/D/O Architects Co. – Inter Crop Group Headquarter, Bangkok, Thailand

Production, Energy & Recycling
Winner: Parviainen Architects – Länsisalmi Power Station, Vantaa, Finland

Highly commended: IDOM – Beronia Rueda Winery, Rueda, Spain

Small Scale Housing – Supported by Grohe
Winner: Allford Hall Monaghan Morris – Weston Street, London, United Kingdom

Highly commended: Tolsa 61, CPDA Arquitectos

Sport
Winner: Koffi & Diabaté Architectes – Gymansium, Blaise Pascal High School, Abidjan, Ivory Coast


Highly commended: FaulknerBrowns Architects – Sportcampus Zuiderpark, The Hague, Netherlands

FUTURE PROJECTS:

Civic Future Projects
Winner: BAAD Studio – The Sunken Shrine of Our Lady of Lourdes of Cabetican, Bacolor, Philippines

Highly Commended: Provencher_Roy + GLCRM Architectes – The reception pavilion of Québec’s National Assembly, Québec, Canada

Competition Entries Future Projects 

Winner: Nextoffice – Sadra Civic Center, Sadra, Iran


Highly Commended: Studio Gang – Tour Montparnasse, Paris, France

Experimental Future Projects

Winner: KANVA – Imago, Montreal, Canada

Health Future Projects
Winner: Allford Hall Monaghan Morris – The Alder Centre, Liverpool, United Kingdom

Highly Commended: White Arkitekter – Panzi Hospital Bukavu, Republic of Congo

Infrastructure Future Projects
Winner: Monk Mackenzie + Novare – Thiruvalluvar, Kanyakumari, India

Highly Commended: Hawkins\Brown – Thames Tideway Tunnel, London, United Kingdom

Leisure Led Future Projects
Winner: BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group – Audemars Piguet Hôtel des Horlogers, Le Brassus, Switzerland

Highly Commended: GOA – Alila Wuzhen, Jiaxing, China

Office Future Projects – Supported by Forbo
Winner: 3XN Architects – Olympic House – International Olympic Comittee HQ, Lausanne, Switzerland


Highly Commended: Helen & Hard Architects with SAAHA Architects – Bjergsted Financial Park, Bjergsted, Norway

UNESCO and UIA to begin Designating Cities as “World Capitals of Architecture”

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UNESCO and UIA to begin Designating Cities as "World Capitals of Architecture", © Shutterstock
© Shutterstock

UNESCO and the International Union of Architects (UIA) have announced the launch of a “World Capitals of Architecture” initiative, seeking to create a “synergy between culture and architecture in an increasingly urbanized world.”

Cities designated as World Capitals of Architecture will become a global forum for discussion on the world’s most pressing challenges “through the prism of culture, heritage, urban planning, and architecture.” UNESCO and UIA will collaborate with local city organizations to organize activities and events promoting buildings, architects, planners, and related sectors.

UNESCO’s association with the UIA’s World Capital of Architecture initiative marks a new step in our long-standing partnership. The aim is to create new synergies between culture and architecture in an increasingly urban world, in which cities are hubs for ideas, trade, culture, science and social development in particular. Through this initiative, our ambition is to ensure that these cities are also perceived as open and creative spaces for exchange, invention and innovation
-Ernesto Ottone R, UNESCO Assistant Director-General for Culture

The initiative is a response to Goal 11 of the Sustainable Development Agenda 2030, to “make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable.” As more people continue to move to cities, the initiative reflects a commitment by UNESCO and UIA to mobilize governments, preserve heritage, and adapt to climate change and mass urbanization.

We want to highlight how architects, with the help of local governments and communities, can play a key role in identifying solutions that benefit communities,” said Thomas Vonier. “Connecting culture and architecture is essential to create inclusive, productive and sustainable cities and communities for all.
-Ernesto Ottone R, UNESCO Assistant Director-General for Culture

News via: International Union of Architects

The 20 Largest Cities in the World of 2018

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The 20 Largest Cities in the World of 2018, via shutterstock.com
via shutterstock.com

By 2050, the world will be home to almost 10 billion people, two-thirds of which will live in cities. As the transition from rural to urban continues, a network of metropolises across the world is rapidly expanding. Today, the world’s 20 largest cities are home to almost half a billion people, a number only set to rise as urban centers become taller, more expansive, and more dense.

Below, we have rounded up the top 20 cities in the world of 2018, with additional figures on population, area, and density. Eight of the top 10 cities are in Asia, with India and China both containing 3 of the top 20. The largest American city is New York City, while the largest city on the European continent is Moscow. Read on below for the full results.

1. Tokyo-Yokohama, Japan

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Tokyo. Image via shutterstock.com

Tokyo. Image via shutterstock.com

Population: 38,050,000
Area: 8,547 sqkm
Density: 4,500/sqkm

2. Jakarta, Indonesia

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Jakarta. Image via shutterstock.com

Jakarta. Image via shutterstock.com

Population: 32,275,000
Area: 3,302 sqkm
Density: 9,800/sqkm

3. Dehli, India

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Delhi. Image via shutterstock.com

Delhi. Image via shutterstock.com

Population: 27,280,000
Area: 2,202 sqkm
Density: 12,400/sqkm

4. Manila, Philippines

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Manila. Image via shutterstock.com

Manila. Image via shutterstock.com

Population: 24,650,000
Area: 1,787 sqkm
Density: 13,600/sqkm

5. Seoul, South Korea

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Seoul. Image via shutterstock.com

Seoul. Image via shutterstock.com

Population: 24,210,000
Area: 2,745 sqkm
Density: 8,800/sqkm

6. Shanghai, China

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Shanghai. Image via shutterstock.com

Shanghai. Image via shutterstock.com

Population: 24,115,000
Area: 4,015 sqkm
Density: 6,000/sqkm

7. Mumbai, India

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Mumbai. Image via shutterstock.com

Mumbai. Image via shutterstock.com

Population: 23,265,000
Area: 881 sqkm
Density: 26,400/sqkm

8. New York City, USA

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New York. Image via shutterstock.com

New York. Image via shutterstock.com

Population: 21,575,000
Area: 11,875 sqkm
Density: 1,700/sqkm

9. Beijing, China

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Beijing. Image via shutterstock.com

Beijing. Image via shutterstock.com

Population: 21,250,000
Area: 4,144 sqkm
Density: 5,100/sqkm

10. Sao Paulo, Brazil

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Sao Paulo. Image via shutterstock.com

Sao Paulo. Image via shutterstock.com

Population: 21,100,000
Area: 3,043 sqkm
Density: 6,900/sqkm

11. Mexico City, Mexico

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Mexico. Image via shutterstock.com

Mexico. Image via shutterstock.com

Population: 20,565,000
Area: 2,370 sqkm
Density: 8,700/sqkm

12. Guangzhou, China

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Guangzhou. Image via shutterstock.com

Guangzhou. Image via shutterstock.com

Population: 19,965,000
Area: 3,820 sqkm
Density: 5,200/sqkm

13. Dhaka, Bangladesh

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Dhaka. Image via shutterstock.com

Dhaka. Image via shutterstock.com

Population: 17,425,000
Area: 368 sqkm
Density: 47,400/sqkm

14. Osaka-Kobe-Kyoto, Japan

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Osaka. Image via shutterstock.com

Osaka. Image via shutterstock.com

Population: 17,165,000
Area: 3,238 sqkm
Density: 5,300/sqk

15. Moscow, Russia

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Moscow. Image via shutterstock.com

Moscow. Image via shutterstock.com

Population: 16,855,000
Area: 5,698 sqkm
Density: 3,000/sqkm

16. Greater Cairo, Egypt

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Cairo. Image via shutterstock.com

Cairo. Image via shutterstock.com

Population: 16,545,000
Area: 1,917 sqkm
Density: 8,600/sqkm

17. Bangkok, Thailand

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Bangkok. Image via shutterstock.com

Bangkok. Image via shutterstock.com

Population: 15,975,000
Area: 3,043 sqkm
Density: 5,200/sqkm

18. Los Angeles, USA

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Los Angeles. Image via shutterstock.com

Los Angeles. Image via shutterstock.com

Population: 15,620,000
Area: 6,299 sqkm
Density: 2,300/sqkm

19. Buenos Aires, Argentina

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Buenos Aires. Image via shutterstock.com

Buenos Aires. Image via shutterstock.com

Population: 15,520,000
Area: 6,299 sqkm
Density: 2,300/sqkm

20. Kolkata, India

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Kolkata. Image via shutterstock.com

Kolkata. Image via shutterstock.com

Population: 15,095,000
Area: 1,347 sqkm
Density: 11,200/sqkm

4 Projects That Show Mass Timber is the Future of American Cities

4 Projects That Show Mass Timber is the Future of American Cities, © DLR Group

© DLR Group

As architects face up to the need for ethical, sustainable design in the age of climate change awareness, timber architecture is making a comeback in a new, technologically impressive way. Largely overlooked in the age of Modernism, recent years have seen a plethora of advancements related to mass timber across the world. This year alone, Japan announced plans for a supertall wooden skyscraper in Tokyo by 2041, while the European continent has seen plans for the world’s largest timber building in the Netherlands, and the world’s tallest timber tower in Norway.

The potential for mass timber to become the dominant material of future sustainable cities has also gained traction in the United States throughout 2018. Evolving codes and the increasing availability of mass timber is inspiring firms, universities, and state legislators to research and invest in ambitious projects across the country.

The year has seen milestones such as Oregon becoming the first U.S. state to legalize mass timber high rise buildings, MIT unveiling its technology-driven, prefabricated Longhouse, and the University of Arkansas beginning construction on the country’s first large-scale, mass timber higher education residence hall. The benefits of mass timber were also displayed at the AIA Conference on Architecture 2018, as part of the “Blueprint for Better Cities” theme.

In recognition of the growth and potential of pass timber, we have assembled four projects currently being researched and conceptualized across the U.S. that are redefining what is possible with wood. From a bridge in Brooklyn to timber towers across Philadelphia, Chicago, and San Francisco, the future schemes offer four in-tree-guing examples of how mass timber might redefine the skylines of future American cities.

Timber Towers in Philadelphia

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© Hickok Cole

© Hickok Cole

© Hickok Cole© Hickok Cole© Hickok Cole© Hickok Cole+ 30

DC Designers led by Sean McTaggart from Hickok Cole were shortlisted for the Skyhive Skyscraper challenge for the Philly Timber Towers project, demonstrating the viability of the mass timber high-rise as an alternative to steel and concrete. While in the process of designing the new landmark for Philadelphia’s skyline, the group also received a grant to work on a mass timber Ranger Station in DC.

80-story River Beech Tower in Chicago

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© Perkins+Will

© Perkins+Will

© Perkins+Will© Perkins+Will© Perkins+Will© Perkins+Will+ 30

Architects at Perkins+Will, working with engineers at Thornton Tomasetti, have conceptualized an 80-story mass timber building in Chicago. The scheme features 300 duplex units using an exterior diagrid system that leverages the natural axial strength of timber. This concept has been informed by recent Skidmore, Owings and Merrill Timber Towers research which found that timber-concrete hybrid systems can support loads of 82,000 pounds (8 times the required load) along with some steel hybrid systems that could be marketable in terms of bay sizes and floor openings.

Mass Timber Multifamily in San Francisco

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© DLR Group

© DLR Group

© DLR Group© DLR Group© DLR Group© DLR Group+ 30

Jose Brunner, a designer at DLR Group’s San Francisco office, designed a modular timber tower atop a landmark building in San Francisco’s Mission District for the “Mission: Housing design competition.” The project exploits mass timber’s potential as a strong but light-weight material for alternative development, providing additional housing in the heart of the city without the need to demolish of existing structures or displace existing residents.

Timber Bridge at LongPoint Corridor in Brooklyn, NYC

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© CREME

© CREME

© CREME© CREME© CREME© CREME+ 30

For the past few years, architect Jun Aizaki of CRÈME has been working on the Timber Bridge at LongPoint Corridor; a floating passageway he proposes should be made of wood. Linking Brooklyn and Queens, the bridge exploits an opportunity to improve pedestrian transit, create green spaces, and connect the communities of Long Island City and Greenpoint into a new neighborhood coined “LongPoint.”

Learn more about tall wood buildings and check out completed taller wood projects. You can also stay up to date with the latest timber projects by following our mass timber tag.

News via ThinkWood

The Met Selects wHY Architecture to Renovate Rockefeller Wing in New York City

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The Met Selects wHY Architecture to Renovate Rockefeller Wing in New York City, Michael C. Rockefeller Wing. Image Courtesy of wHY Architecture
Michael C. Rockefeller Wing. Image Courtesy of wHY Architecture

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City has selected Kulapat Yantrasast and wHY Architecture to renovate its Michael C. Rockefeller wing. With arts produced in Africa, Oceania and the Americas, the 40,000-square-foot wing is located on the southern side of the Fifth Avenue museum. The $70 million project aim is showcase the collection of arts and artifacts from sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific Islands, and the Americas.

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Michael C. Rockefeller Wing. Image Courtesy of wHY Architecture

Michael C. Rockefeller Wing. Image Courtesy of wHY Architecture

Almost 50 years after the founding of the met’s curatorial department on the arts of Africa, Oceania and Americas, the new AAOA renovation will reimagine the galleries to draw on the architectural traits of the regions. Kulapat Yantrasast commented on the renovation of the galleries, stating that, “we will be seeking to illuminate their artistic brilliance by invoking a sense of place through referencing architectural vernaculars relevant to each segment, while also tethering these aspects to historical movements.”

Daniel h. Weiss, president and CEO of The Met, said that, “by ushering artistic traditions of three-quarters of the globe into the met, the building of the Rockefeller wing helped define us as an encyclopedic fine arts museum. Its expansive and diverse character uniquely resonates with our global city. The renovation of this suite of galleries will at once make a unique and timely civic contribution to our community and immeasurably enrich and deepen appreciation of a vast swath of the world’s artistic dynamism.”

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Michael C. Rockefeller Wing. Image Courtesy of wHY Architecture

Michael C. Rockefeller Wing. Image Courtesy of wHY Architecture

The project is one part of a larger museum plan, including the renovation of the British decorative arts and sculpture galleries, updates to the European Paintings galleries, and renovation of the Modern Wing.The AAOA department was established in 1969 after former US vice president Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller donated his fine-arts survey of non-Western art traditions. The collection included African and Oceanic works that were not yet represented in the museum, and the addition prompted the start of the new wing. The renovation of the Rockefeller wing is set to begin in late 2020, and aims to be complete in 2023.

Europe’s Largest Wooden Construction Revealed by Triptych, Duncan Lewis, Park and OXO

Europe's Largest Wooden Construction Revealed by Triptych, Duncan Lewis, Park and OXO, ECOTONE. Image Courtesy of Triptych, Duncan Lewis, Park, OXO

ECOTONE. Image Courtesy of Triptych, Duncan Lewis, Park, OXO

Triptych, Duncan Lewis, Park, and OXO Architects reveal a design for Europe’s largest wooden construction in Arcueil, France. Called Ecotone, the project is sited in the Coteau Area of southern Paris as a multi-use space set to link city and landscape. The design takes the form of two hybrid hills with trees and a large staircase containing several terraces and patios. Ecotone aims to rethink the future of sustainable cities and timber construction.

ECOTONE. Image Courtesy of Triptych, Duncan Lewis, Park, OXOECOTONE. Image Courtesy of Triptych, Duncan Lewis, Park, OXOECOTONE. Image Courtesy of Triptych, Duncan Lewis, Park, OXOECOTONE. Image Courtesy of Triptych, Duncan Lewis, Park, OXO+ 13

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ECOTONE. Image Courtesy of Triptych, Duncan Lewis, Park, OXO

ECOTONE. Image Courtesy of Triptych, Duncan Lewis, Park, OXO
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ECOTONE. Image Courtesy of Triptych, Duncan Lewis, Park, OXO

ECOTONE. Image Courtesy of Triptych, Duncan Lewis, Park, OXO

Inspired by biomimicry, the project will include walls that open and close depending on the weather, a thin roof that breathes, and wells that regulate the temperature. At 82,000 square meters, Ecotone will serve as work space and housing for up to 5000 occupants. The project combines offices, hotel, restaurants, shops and a sports hall. It’s name is derived from the transition zone between two ecosystems, called an “ecotone” in biology. This central concept aims to build a new interface between urban development and nature.

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ECOTONE. Image Courtesy of Triptych, Duncan Lewis, Park, OXO

ECOTONE. Image Courtesy of Triptych, Duncan Lewis, Park, OXO
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ECOTONE. Image Courtesy of Triptych, Duncan Lewis, Park, OXO

ECOTONE. Image Courtesy of Triptych, Duncan Lewis, Park, OXO

The site benefits from metropolitan accessibility to transportation and amenities, as well drawing connections to health and digital economy clusters nearby.​ The architecture is inspired by nature, from the bird’s nest to the hive of bees. As the four firms have stated, “Nature knows better than man how to design its habitat by ensuring structural qualities, thermal and exceptional uses.” Ecotone will be the biggest wood construction in Europe. and at the time of the global ecological crisis, Ecotone aims to become a symbol of Paris and its commitment to tackling climate change.

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