Matthijs la Roi and BART//BRATKE Design “Cultural Jewel” Concert Hall in Nuremberg

Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects
Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects
 

BART//BRATKE & Matthijs la Roi Architects have released images of their proposed new concert hall in Nuremberg, Germany. The “Nuremberg Konzerthaus” seeks to extend the historically rich heritage of the Meistersingerhalle municipal center, contributing a unique musical experience to the cultural city. The proposed concert hall establishes a dialogue with the Meistersingerhalle, connected in a symbolic “band” podium made of natural stone, recalling the rock formations of nearby quarries.

Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi ArchitectsCourtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi ArchitectsCourtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi ArchitectsCourtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects+ 11

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Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects

Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects
 

Seeking to represent a cultural jewel in the Nuremberg area, the Konzerthaus playfully interacts with the modernist elements of the Meistersingerhalle, manifesting them in a contemporary language. While a solid base grounds the structure horizontally, vertical elements such as a foyer, expressive stairway, public bleachers, assembly venues and diagonals break the stringent horizontality of the band, resulting in an open, inviting perimeter.

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Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects

Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects
 

The Konzerthaus seeks to seamlessly integrate with the surrounding urban park landscape of the Luitpoldhain, running through the open foyer and elevated corridors of the building. The concert hall volume, combined with the Meistersingerhalle, define an articulated forecourt and main entrance, activated through the public foyer functions along its perimeter. The concert hall, perceived as a freestanding object from the outside, is clad in wooden strips on the interior and exterior. In order to maintain a human scale in the 1600-seat space, the monolithic form the hall is broken into balconies, information desks, and break-out zones.

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Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects

Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects
 

A separation of public and private functions defines the interior program. The main entrance for visitors leads directly into the vertical atrium, with all public functions arranged along the foyer. Meanwhile, a rear building caters for artists and employees, with a centrally-located artists lounge directly connecting to the stage and catering area. To improve circulation efficiency, the delivery, instrument room, and artists’ dressing rooms are all connected at the same level.

News via: BART//BRATKEMatthijs la Roi Architects

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