Hamonic + Masson Architects Awarded Project in Imagine Angers Competition

Hamonic + Masson Architects Awarded Project in Imagine Angers Competition, Courtesy of Luxigon
Courtesy of Luxigon

France-based Hamonic + Masson Architects has been selected as one of the winners for the Imagine Angers Competition, which asked teams to propose innovative designs to be built on one of six different sites in the town of Angers, France. The winning teams were announced by the mayor of Angers at MIPIM, a real estate conference, held in Cannes. Other participating architects include Manuelle Gautrand, Steven Holl, Duncan Lewis, XTU, Sou FUJIMOTO and OXO architects.

Save this picture!

Courtesy of Luxigon

Courtesy of Luxigon

Hamonic + Masson Architects’ project, called Metamorphose, on one of the larger sites called the Quai Saint-Serge, responded to the need for a revitalization of this industrial zone which would transform the area into a dynamic and lively neighborhood.

Save this picture!

Courtesy of Luxigon

Courtesy of Luxigon

Their 24,000 square meter design contains apartments, a sports center with a rock climbing wall and gym, a restaurant, offices, and a parking area.

Save this picture!

Courtesy of Luxigon

Courtesy of Luxigon

The scheme reflects the ambition of the city and provides a sense of harmony between the public spaces. It proposes a new way of living in Angers that connects with the surrounding site by treating the interstitial spaces as different topographical levels, making the building appear to be an extrusion from the site.

News via: Hamonic + Masson Architects.

C.F Møller and MT Højgaard Propose Covering Aarhus Railway Site with Car-Free Urban District

Courtesy of C.F. Møller Architects

Courtesy of C.F. Møller Architects

C.F Møller and MT Højgaard have unveiled their vision of a new Railway Quarter in Aarhus, Denmark, transforming the area into a car-free urban district. Covering 1,180,000 square feet (110,000 square meters) of new construction, the area will predominantly contain residential buildings up to six stories high, as well as retail and recreational areas.

The idea of covering the railway site in Aarhus has existed for decades, with upcoming infrastructural upgrades to the network calling for tracks be lowered further into the ground, creating the opportunity to occupy the existing overhead site currently dividing several areas of Aarhus.

Save this picture!

Courtesy of C.F. Møller Architects

Courtesy of C.F. Møller Architects

The proposal calls for new residential structures integrated with the existing urban fabric, maintaining a building height of six stories. Towards Bruuns Bro and Frederiks Bro, an active transition including shops and recreational areas is proposed, while peripheral zones around the Railway Quarter will be upgraded with new urban spaces establishing a connection and transition to Aarhus city center.

The proposal also includes the establishment of parking decks on columns above the railway site, on top of which a new urban quarter can be built. To facilitate the car-free aspect of the scheme, bicycle parking and taxi flows will be integrated across the site for improved mobility.

Save this picture!

Courtesy of C.F. Møller Architects

Courtesy of C.F. Møller Architects

This is a historic opportunity to realize the vision of even greater interconnection of the centre of Aarhus by launching a unique urban quarter to complete the ongoing urban development of Aarhus. With the Railway Quarter, we wish to create visionary urban regeneration, to achieve a sustainable, green, vibrant and car-free quarter with a bustling shopping environment and a residential area full of diversity. We will create unique, attractive urban spaces of international caliber.
-Michael Kruse, Partner, C.F. Møller Architects

Save this picture!

Courtesy of C.F. Møller Architects

Courtesy of C.F. Møller Architects

The C.F Møller and MT Højgaard proposal is still “on the drawing board” with the City of Aarhus set to consider the proposal’s viability.

News via: C.F. Møller Architects

7 Iconic Buildings Reimagined in Different Architectural Styles

7 Iconic Buildings Reimagined in Different Architectural Styles, Courtesy of Expedia
Courtesy of Expedia

Architectural styles derive their uniqueness by demonstrating the construction techniques, political movements, and social changes that make up the zeitgeist of a place in a particular moment of time. Whether it was the rebirth of art and culture with Renaissance architecture, or the steel skyscrapers that emerged in the post-war movement, each stylistic change tells us something different about the transitions of architectural history. But what if architecture rejected a critical regionalist approach, and buildings took on the characteristics of another place? These seven images made for Expedia provide a glimpse into what some of our favorite architectural icons would look like if they were built in a different style.

Sydney Opera House in Tudor style

Save this picture!

Courtesy of Expedia

Courtesy of Expedia

Fallingwater in Classical style

Save this picture!

Courtesy of Expedia

Courtesy of Expedia

CN Tower in Ancient Egyptian style

Save this picture!

Courtesy of Expedia

Courtesy of Expedia

The Louvre in Brutalist style

Save this picture!

Courtesy of Expedia

Courtesy of Expedia

Buckingham Palace in Bauhaus style

Save this picture!

Courtesy of Expedia

Courtesy of Expedia

Petronas Towers in Gothic style

Save this picture!

Courtesy of Expedia

Courtesy of Expedia

Niterói Contemporary Art Museum in Sustainable style

Save this picture!

Courtesy of Expedia

Courtesy of Expedia

h/t Expedia

Matthijs la Roi and BART//BRATKE Design “Cultural Jewel” Concert Hall in Nuremberg

Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects
Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects
 

BART//BRATKE & Matthijs la Roi Architects have released images of their proposed new concert hall in Nuremberg, Germany. The “Nuremberg Konzerthaus” seeks to extend the historically rich heritage of the Meistersingerhalle municipal center, contributing a unique musical experience to the cultural city. The proposed concert hall establishes a dialogue with the Meistersingerhalle, connected in a symbolic “band” podium made of natural stone, recalling the rock formations of nearby quarries.

Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi ArchitectsCourtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi ArchitectsCourtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi ArchitectsCourtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects+ 11

Save this picture!

Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects

Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects
 

Seeking to represent a cultural jewel in the Nuremberg area, the Konzerthaus playfully interacts with the modernist elements of the Meistersingerhalle, manifesting them in a contemporary language. While a solid base grounds the structure horizontally, vertical elements such as a foyer, expressive stairway, public bleachers, assembly venues and diagonals break the stringent horizontality of the band, resulting in an open, inviting perimeter.

Save this picture!

Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects

Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects
 

The Konzerthaus seeks to seamlessly integrate with the surrounding urban park landscape of the Luitpoldhain, running through the open foyer and elevated corridors of the building. The concert hall volume, combined with the Meistersingerhalle, define an articulated forecourt and main entrance, activated through the public foyer functions along its perimeter. The concert hall, perceived as a freestanding object from the outside, is clad in wooden strips on the interior and exterior. In order to maintain a human scale in the 1600-seat space, the monolithic form the hall is broken into balconies, information desks, and break-out zones.

Save this picture!

Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects

Courtesy of BART//BRATKE, Matthijs la Roi Architects
 

A separation of public and private functions defines the interior program. The main entrance for visitors leads directly into the vertical atrium, with all public functions arranged along the foyer. Meanwhile, a rear building caters for artists and employees, with a centrally-located artists lounge directly connecting to the stage and catering area. To improve circulation efficiency, the delivery, instrument room, and artists’ dressing rooms are all connected at the same level.

News via: BART//BRATKEMatthijs la Roi Architects

PENDANT LAMP / CONTEMPORARY / METHACRYLATE / POLYESTER MOARÉ BY ANTONI AROLA

pendant lamp / contemporary / methacrylate / polyester

Characteristics

  • Type:

    pendant

  • Style:

    contemporary

  • Material:

    methacrylate, polyester

  • Other characteristics:

    LED, incandescent, compact fluorescent

  • Color:

    white, red, silver

  • Market:

    commercial

Description

The Moaré series owes its name to the iridescent effect created by the two outer cylinder-shaped shades, a watercolour optical illusion produced by the superimposed textures against the light. Created in 2003, it soon gained international renown and over the years the collection has come to comprise a range of colours and formats for a wide variety of uses: from major shopping centres to enclosed private household spaces. A ladylike interplay of colour and transparency.

The lamp allows the option to use just a single shade rather than the two required to produce the highly sought-after moiré effect, still retaining the grace of its excellently proportioned outer geometry. A methacrylate interior diffuser, next to the three central bulbs, constantly helps to diffuse its bright light.

CONTEMPORARY CHANDELIER / GLASS / BRASS / PORCELAIN CIRIO BY ANTONI AROLA

contemporary chandelier / glass / brass / porcelain

Characteristics

  • Style:

    contemporary

  • Material:

    glass, brass, porcelain

  • Light source:

    LED

  • Other characteristics:

    commercial

Description

The Cirio Chandelier pools a large body of light onto a focal axis that stands out hugely from its surrounding area. Its dense array of concentric rings, from which twenty, thirty and even forty light sources may be hung thanks to the enlargeable diameter of the structure, gives off a warm, powerful light with a major visual impact. Its design easily accommodates changing the shade to create different ambiences and arrangements from Sargadelos porcelain (lighting up with the warmth of an altar candle) to translucent opal glass or the opaque grace of brass.

Website Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: