Pendant lamp / contemporary / steel / polyethylene GIGANT

Pendant lamp / contemporary / steel / polyethylene GIGANT WEVER & DUCRE

Characteristics

  • Type:

    pendant

  • Style:

    contemporary

  • Material:

    steel, polyethylene

  • Other characteristics:

    dimmable, LED

  • Color:

    white

Description

10.0
LED 42W | 220-240VAC | 50-60Hz
PCB 3-step | dali switch dim
opal LLDPE body | steel

Coldefy & Associates Design World’s Largest Single-Domed Tropical Greenhouse

Coldefy & Associates Design World's Largest Single-Domed Tropical Greenhouse, Courtesy of Coldefy & Associates
Courtesy of Coldefy & Associates

French firm Coldefy & Associates has unveiled images of their design proposal for the world’s largest tropical greenhouse under one roof. Situated in Pas-de-Calais, France, “Tropicalia” will cover an area of 215,000 square feet (20,000 square meters) featuring a tropical forest, turtle beach, a pool for Amazonian fish, and a one-kilometer-long walking trail. The biome aims to offer a “harmonious haven” where visitors are immediately immersed in a seemingly natural environment under a single domed roof.

Courtesy of Coldefy & AssociatesCourtesy of Coldefy & AssociatesCourtesy of Coldefy & AssociatesCourtesy of Coldefy & Associates+ 8

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Courtesy of Coldefy & Associates

Courtesy of Coldefy & Associates

Designed in collaboration with energy company Dalkia, the $62-million Coldefy & Associate scheme aims to create a stable 26-degrees-Celsius environment within the greenhouse. To achieve this, the architects adopted a similar solution to Nicholas Grimshaw’s Eden Project, using a combination of structural steel and ETFE plastic technology.

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Courtesy of Coldefy & Associates

Courtesy of Coldefy & Associates

The scheme will feature a “double-dome” of 200-foot x 13-foot (60-meter x 4-meter) ETFE strips forming a pressurized “cushion,” allowing UV light to pass through while controlling thermal conditions inside. A third layer of ETFE underneath the structure will accumulate heat generated by the greenhouse effect to be exploited for thermal energy. In order to further enhance the scheme’s energy performance, and to integrate the large structure with its natural surroundings, the dome will be partially embedded in the landscape. When combined, these measures create an energy-self-sufficient scheme allowing for energy to be redistributed to surrounding buildings.

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Courtesy of Coldefy & Associates

Courtesy of Coldefy & Associates

This double insulating dome will protect the tropical ecosystem in summer and maintain its temperature in winter. The partial burial of the greenhouse will reinforce this insulation. The excess heat can therefore be directly used, stored or redistributed to our neighbors as part of a network of private heat or a “smartgrid.”
– Denis Bobillier, Technical Director of Major Projects, Dalkia

The environmental conditions created by the dome allow for an “exceptional oasis for tropical flora and fauna” beneath. Visitors are led along a kilometer-long path, encountering an 82-foot-high (25-meter-high) waterfall, 82-foot-long (25-meter-long) “tactile pool” filled with koi carp, and an Olympic-sized pool filled with Amazonian fish, some growing up to 3 meters in length. Visitors can experience these fish through an aquarium-style glass surface, or more daringly, via a platform and pontoon.

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Courtesy of Coldefy & Associates

Courtesy of Coldefy & Associates
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Courtesy of Coldefy & Associates

Courtesy of Coldefy & Associates

To accompany the tropical environment, Tropicalia will contain an auditorium, bar/restaurant, bed and breakfast, and a scientific area dedicated to national and international collaboration, containing a conference room, laboratory, and clinic. When opened, the scheme is expected to attract 500,000 visitors per year.

Tropicalia is due to begin construction in 2019, with a planned opening in 2021.

News via: Coldefy & Associates

Which Architecture Firms Are Building the Most in New York City?

Which Architecture Firms Are Building the Most in New York City?, Courtesy of Related-Oxford
Courtesy of Related-Oxford

In an industry-affiliated overshadowed by the so-called ‘starchitects’, do we really know who is dominating in the field of architecture? Often it is found that for most of the projects bearing the big names, there are the firms assuming the roles of “executive architect” that work behind the scenes to enable the high-profile buildings to get through planning and construction.

To give us insight into which architecture practices actually have the most impact across in New York City, The Real Deal have compiled a list of the 30 firms with the highest square footage of new buildings across the five boroughs over a six-year period from the 1st of January 2012 until the 31st of January 2018. There are of course many of the firms that you would expect, although as you will see there are also a few that have gone under the radar so far and may be worth watching out for in the future…

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Courtesy of Heatherwick Studio

Courtesy of Heatherwick Studio

NYC’s Most Active Architecture Firms

  1. SLCE Architects, 20.69 million sq. ft (87 projects)
  2. Hill West Architects, 13.09 million sq. ft (43 projects)
  3. Dattner Architects, 9.54 million sq. ft (65 projects)
  4. Perkins Eastman, 8.80 million sq. ft (48 projects)
  5. Adamson Associate Architects, 8.69 million sq. ft (10 projects)
  6. Kohn Pederson Fox Associates, 8.32 million sq. ft (12 projects)
  7. Handel Architects, 6.96 million sq. ft (30 projects)
  8. Aufgang Architects, 5.89 million sq. ft (59 projects)
  9. Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, 5.86 million sq. ft (12 projects)
  10. Fischer and Makooi Architects (Karl Fischer), 4.87 million sq. ft (93 projects)
  11. ODA Architecture, 4.66 million sq. ft (31 projects)
  12. Ismael Leyva Architects, 4.29 million sq. ft (23 projects)
  13. Gene Kaufman Architect, 4.16 million sq. ft (54 projects)
  14. SHoP Architects, 3.74 million sq. ft (17 projects)
  15. CetraRuddy Architecture, 3.64 million sq. ft (14 projects)
  16. Stephen B. Jacobs Group, 3.59 million sq. ft (23 projects)
  17. Margulies Hoelzli Architecture, 3.43 million sq. ft (7 projects)
  18. FXCollaborative, 3.14 million sq. ft (15 projects)
  19. Davis Brody Bond, 3.07 million sq. ft (7 projects)
  20. S9 Architecture, 3.07 million sq. ft (19 projects)
  21. Magnusson Architecture and Planning, 3.01 million sq. ft (30 projects)
  22. Curtis + Ginsberg Architects, 2.64 million sq. ft (18 projects)
  23. Badaly Architect, 2.55 million sq. ft (103 projects)
  24. Gerald J. Caliendo Architect, 2.36 million sq. ft (128 projects)
  25. Marvel Architects, 2.35 million sq. ft (16 projects)
  26. Butz Wilbern, 2.34 million sq. ft (34 projects)
  27. Ford & Associates Architects, 2.32 million sq. ft (1 project)
  28. Issac & Stern Architects, 2.14 million sq. ft (83 projects)
  29. Angelo Ng & Anthony Ng Architects Studio, 1.92 million sq. ft (66 projects)
  30. Tan Architect, 1.88 million sq. ft (77 projects)

News ViaThe Real Deal.

Recessed wall light fixture / LED / square / rectangular ATIM

Recessed wall light fixture / LED / square / rectangular ATIM WEVER & DUCRE

Characteristics

  • Type:

    recessed wall

  • Light source:

    LED

  • Shape:

    square, rectangular

  • Location:

    outdoor

  • Material:

    stainless steel, glass

  • Protection class:

    IP65

  • Other characteristics:

    dimmable

Description

1.0 LED
LED 6W | 220-240VAC | 50-60Hz
PCB 3-step | incl. PS | phase-cut dim
stainless steel | satinated glass

Fabric Projects | Decoustics

 

  • Use

    Walls, ceilings
  • Applications

    Airports, arenas, hospitals, restaurants, universities, offices, lobbies, auditoriums, hotels
  • Characteristics

    Reduce reverberation and noise transmissions, control and elimination of environmental noise pollution, all Decoustics’ acoustical ceiling systems and panels are manufactured to individual project requirements, including sizes, shapes and finishes

More about this product

Decoustics acoustical ceiling systems and panels reduce reverberation and noise transmissions. Control and elimination of environmental noise pollution and its effects on the quality of life has become an imperative; as such, architects and designers have turned to Decoustics to provide solutions that not only look great, but sound better. Decoustics custom ceilings can be found in many applications, from hospitals, courtrooms, boardrooms, to auditoriums.

Fabric Projects – Ceilings:

1. Baffles
Decoustics Baffles and Free Hanging Screens are constructed using two 1″2 (25mm) thick medium density fiberglass cores assembled together to create an overall 2″ (50mm) thickness which is then upholstered. Free Hanging Screens are typically large baffles which provide acoustical control and visual privacy. All Decoustics Baffles and Screens are manufactured to individual project requirements, including sizes, shapes and finishes.

2. Domes
Decoustics Custom Curved Domes are compound curved panels that provide architects and designers with domed ceilings. Curved Dome Shaped Panels consist of compounded, three-dimensional factor pre-curved units that use one radius in all directions throughout the curve. Different mounting methods can be employed when using Decoustics Custom Curved Domes, depending on access to plenum requirements. Dome Shaped Panels are only available in fabric finish.

3. Vault
Decoustics Custom Curved Vaults provide architects and designers with a unique way to create visual expression. Panels consist of factory pre-curved units having one radius throughout the curve. Different mounting methods can be employed when using Decoustics Custom Vaults, depending on access to plenum requirements.

4. Cones
Decoustics Custom Curved Conical Shaped Acoustical Panels are acoustically absorptive panels that provide architects and designers with conical ceilings. These panels consist of complex, two-dimensional pre-curved sections that have variable radii throughout the curve. Custom Curved Conical Panels are manufactured to individual project requirements, including custom sizes, shapes, thicknesses and finishes.

5. Ceilencio
This complete ceiling suspension system is 100% downwardly accessible and can be tailored to perfectly complement your designs. Now your design is limited only by your imagination.

The Ceilencio suspension system is custom designed, engineered and manufactured to meet the needs of the design. Any shape, any configuration; there are no design limits with Ceilencio.

Triangles. Diamonds. Pentagons. Any shape you want. This complete ceiling solution can be tailored to perfectly complement your designs, without sacrificing convenience and performance.

Each suspension system is custom designed, engineered and manufactured to meet the needs of your project.

Individualized custom butterfly clips are designed and built to accommodate your project. Every Ceilencio project is unique, so every butterfly clip is too.

The Ceilencio grid installs easily, and 100% downwardly accessible panels provide convenient access to the plenum.

Multiple Decoustics finishes can be specified into the Ceilencio grid system.

Claro® acoustical panels
Quadrillo® and Solo-M natural wood acoustical panels
Metallo® metallic-finish acoustic panels
– Full range of fabric and vinyl options available and non-acoustical options

6. Acoustical Panel
Decoustics
Acoustic Panels are constructed from a medium density fiberglass core and are recommended for areas that will not be subjected to abuse or impact. These general purpose acoustical wall panels are manufactured to suit individual project requirements including, where required, special shapes, sizes, curves, thicknesses and finishes.

Fabric Projects – Walls:

1. Acoustical Wall Panel
Decoustics Acoustic Panels are constructed from a medium density fiberglass core and are recommended for areas that will not be subjected to abuse or impact. These general purpose acoustical wall panels are manufactured to suit individual project requirements including, where required, special shapes, sizes, curves, thicknesses and finishes.

2. Appliqué
Decoustics Appliqué acoustical wall* panel is constructed from a medium density fiberglass core and an Appliqué high density fiberglass facer. The Appliqué facer is adhered to the core panel and can be either raised (3D effect) or flush. Decoustics Appliqué acoustical wall panels are manufactured to suit individual project requirements including, where required, special shapes, sizes, curves, thicknesses and finishes.

*The Appliqué panel can also be used in ceiling applications

3. Integral Air Space
Decoustics Integral Air Space acoustical wall panel is constructed from a medium density fiberglass core with a built up perimeter. The air space created by the built up perimeter may be left empty, or filled with a light density core to achieve greater sound absorption. Decoustics Integral Air Space acoustical wall panels are manufactured to suit individual project requirements including, where required, special shapes, sizes, curves, thicknesses and finishes.

4. Reflective
Decoustics Reflective acoustical wall panels reflect sound where needed. There are three different cores to choose from, depending upon the application: fire retardant particle board or MDF, gypsum board and Decoustics acoustically reflective membrane acoustical panel. The Reflective panel is finished with fabric or vinyl, and is manufactured to suit individual project requirements including, where required, special shapes, sizes, and finishes.

5. Stria
Decoustics Stria acoustic wall panel is a decorative panel that can incorporate graphics and logos. Stria panels are constructed from a medium density fiberglass core and high density fiberglass facer with 3/16′ (5mm) deep striations manufactured into the face of the panel. Decoustics Stria acoustical wall panels are manufactured to suit individual project requirements including, where required, special sizes, curves, thicknesses and finishes.

6. Low Frequency Tuner
Decoustics Acoustical Low Frequency Tuner and Low Frequency Tuner ME/LFT (X)2 wall and ceiling panels are constructed from a multiple density fiberglass core and a multiple density core absorber (drumskin). The installed panel provides a means for controlling low frequency reverberation. DecousticsAcoustical Low Frequency Tuner wall and ceiling panels are manufactured to suit individual project requirements including, where required, special shapes and finishes.

– Low Frequency Tuner
All panel components have a Flame Spread rating of less than 25. This panel assembly is Class C.

– Low Frequency Tuner ME/LFT (X)2
All panel components have a Flame Spread rating of less than 25. This panel assembly is Class A.

7. High Impact
– High Impact Resistant / Tackable (H.I.R. #1)
Decoustics High Impact Resistant/Tackable (H.I.R. #1) acoustical wall panel is constructed from a medium density fiberglass core with a smooth high density fiberglass facer. This panel is ideal for light weight, thin or low texture fabrics that typically cannot be stretch applied. Decoustics High Impact Resistant/Tackable acoustical wall panels are manufactured to suit individual project requirements including, where required, special shapes, sizes, curves, thicknesses and finishes, and are ideal for tack surface.

– High Impact Resilient (H.I.R. #2)
Decoustics High Impact Resilient (H.I.R. #2) acoustical wall panel is constructed from a medium density fiberglass core, it incorporates an impact resilient scrim facer. It is able to withstand high impact without crushing or fracturing, and the fabric remains in its original position after impact. Decoustics High Impact Resilient acoustical wall panels are available in a variety of shapes, sizes, curves, thicknesses and finishes.

– High Impact Extreme (H.I.R. #4)
Decoustics High Impact Extreme (H.I.R. #4) acoustical wall panel is constructed from a medium density fiberglass core and incorporates high impact control face component. It is able to withstand very high impact without crushing or fracturing and the fabric remains in its original position after impact. Decoustics High Impact Extreme acoustical wall panels are manufactured to suit individual project requirements including, where required, special shapes, sizes, curves, thicknesses and finishes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7 Ancient Ruins Around The World “Reconstructed” with GIFs

Ancient ruins, like the Parthenon and Luxor Temple, can teach us about the past in a unique way. Through architectural remains, we can gather what building techniques and civilizations were like long ago. Even so, ruins can’t compare to the real deal, and historical reconstructions of these architectural wonders are key to a fuller understanding of the cultures that created them. In these GIFs made by Expedia, seven architectural wonders are reconstructed into their original form, allowing us to see how the ruins visible today developed from the initial structures in all their glory.

The Parthenon

Athens, Greece / 432 BC

Luxor Temple

Luxor, Egypt / 1380 BC

Nohoch Mul Pyramid (Coba)

Quintana Roo, Mexico / 100 BC-100 AD

Temple of Jupiter

Pompeii, Italy / 200 BC

Milecastle 39 (Part of Hadrian’s Wall)

Northumberland, England / 100 AD

The Pyramid of the Sun, Teotihuacán

Teotihuacan, Mexico / 200 CE

Area Sacra di Largo Argentina—Temple B

Rome, Italy / 101 BC

New Architectural Addition to Must-See Landmarks on Norway’s Scenic Tourist Trails

New Architectural Addition to Must-See Landmarks on Norway's Scenic Tourist Trails, Courtesy of Norwegian Public Roads Administration
Courtesy of Norwegian Public Roads Administration

The Norwegian Public Roads Administration is opening a new landmark, Ureddplassen, along the Norwegian Scenic Route Helgelandskysten. Consisting of seating benches, a toilet facility and viewing terrace facing the open sea, Ureddplassen evokes a sense of poetic solitude as it complements the natural landscape of Norway.

Beautifully situated between steep mountains and the open sea, the area is a perfect location to view the Northern Lights in the winter and the midnight sun in the summer. In the same area, there is also a memorial erected in memory of the 42 men who lost their lives when a Norwegian submarine, Uredd (‘Fearless’) hit a German mine in Fugløyfjorden and sank during World War II. The memorial was unveiled by King Olav V on 18 June 1987 and has now been given a new marble base.

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Courtesy of Norwegian Public Roads Administration

Courtesy of Norwegian Public Roads Administration

The toilet facility is constructed with glass and concrete, its wave-like form accompanying the backdrop of the mountains. At night, the facility softly illuminates its surroundings with an ambient glow. There is also a viewing platform in front of the carpark, equipped with seating benches made with marble from Fauske, seamlessly transitioning into an amphitheater of wide steps which lead to a pristine beach area. Here, one can view the natural landscape and appreciate its beauty in a quiet and secluded area.

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Courtesy of Norwegian Public Roads Administration

Courtesy of Norwegian Public Roads Administration

Ureddplassen is a stop along one of the many Norwegian Scenic Routes, where art and architecture work to enhance the qualities of the beautiful Norwegian landscape. When visiting you can also check out  Trollstigen Visitor Center, another stop along the scenic routes. The rest area of Ureddplassen is currently open to the public and the toilet facility will be opened in May.

Architect: Haugen / Zohar Arkitekter AS.
Landscape architect: Landskapsfabrikken – Inge Dahlman.

LED track light / halogen / round / aluminum SQUBE

LED track light / halogen / round / aluminum SQUBE WEVER & DUCRE

Characteristics

  • Light source:

    LED, halogen

  • Shape:

    round

  • Material:

    aluminum

  • Market:

    commercial

  • Other characteristics :

    orientable, dimmable

Description

1.0 LED
LED 6W | 220-240VAC | 50-60Hz
COB 3-step | incl. PS | phase-cut dim
aluminium powder coated
incl. 1-phase track adapter

Backyard Cabin Experiments With 3D-Printed Tiles as a Facade Material

Backyard Cabin Experiments With 3D-Printed Tiles as a Facade Material, The cabin is integrated into the landscape thanks to the hundreds of succulents and air plants that comprise the facade and are held by the 3D-printed hexagonal planter tiles. 3D-printed chairs and tables, also designed by Emerging Objects, serve as both indoor and outdoor furniture. Image © Matthew Millman
The cabin is integrated into the landscape thanks to the hundreds of succulents and air plants that comprise the facade and are held by the 3D-printed hexagonal planter tiles. 3D-printed chairs and tables, also designed by Emerging Objects, serve as both indoor and outdoor furniture. Image © Matthew Millman

This article was originally published by The Architect’s Newspaper as “Cutting-edge 3-D-printing pushes construction boundaries in an Oakland cabin.”

The 3D-printed Cabin of Curiosities is a research endeavor and “proof of concept” investigation into the architectural possibilities of upcycling and custom 3D-printed claddings as a response to 21st-century housing needs.

This exploratory project is an output of Bay Area-based additive manufacturing startup Emerging Objects, founded by Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello, who are professors at the University of California Berkeley and San Jose State University, respectively. They also co-founded the architecture studio Rael San Fratello, whose work primarily focuses on architecture as a cultural endeavor.

The Chroma Curl wall is made of 3D-printed bio-plastic derived from corn. The textured surface creates a floral pattern throughout the interior. Image © Matthew MillmanThe clays used for the tiles are fired at a high temperature resulting in low porosity. Because the clay is recycled from a pottery studio, there is color differentiation in the surface. Image © Matthew MillmanThe seed stitch tiles explore the use of custom code to form a textured pattern that creates a micro-shading effect. Image © Matthew MillmanOver 4,500 3D-printed ceramic tiles clad the majority of the building. The calibrated inconsistencies and material behavior make each tile unique. Ever changing shadows transform the cabin’s surface throughout the day as each seed stitch tile is gently curved to receive the sun and cast shadows. Image © Matthew Millman+ 11

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A corner detail shows 3D-printed ceramic “seed stitch” tiles overlapping on the facade corner. The “planter tiles,” which hold succulents and air plants, face forward. Image © Matthew Millman

A corner detail shows 3D-printed ceramic “seed stitch” tiles overlapping on the facade corner. The “planter tiles,” which hold succulents and air plants, face forward. Image © Matthew Millman

The Cabin of Curiosities is exemplary of Emerging Objects’ work, which dives deep into the material science of additive manufacturing while utilizing open-source tools and standard off-the-shelf printers.

Due to a housing emergency in the Bay Area, the Oakland City Council eased restrictions on the construction of secondary housing units, or backyard cottages. The new rules promote more rental housing by easing parking requirements, allowing homeowners to transform existing backyard buildings like sheds and garages into living spaces, and relaxing height and setback requirements.

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Color variation is achieved using different upcycled and innovative 3D-printable materials invented by Emerging Objects, including recycled chardonnay grape skins from Sonoma, cement, sawdust, and coffee grounds. Image © Matthew Millman

Color variation is achieved using different upcycled and innovative 3D-printable materials invented by Emerging Objects, including recycled chardonnay grape skins from Sonoma, cement, sawdust, and coffee grounds. Image © Matthew Millman

Thusly located in a residential backyard, the one-room gabled structure brings together a collection of performative tile products, from interior translucent glowing wall assemblies to exterior rain screens composed of integrated succulent planters and textural “shingles” that push the boundaries of how quickly one can mass produce 3D-printed architectural components.

Over 4,500 3D-printed ceramic tiles clad the exterior of the building. The firm is committed to focusing on upcycling agricultural and industrial waste products, and at times its custom materials sound more like tasting notes from a nearby Napa or Sonoma wine. Grape skins, salt, cement, and sawdust, among others, have been integrated into Emerging Objects’ products to create variety among the tiles.

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Over 4,500 3D-printed ceramic tiles clad the majority of the building. The calibrated inconsistencies and material behavior make each tile unique. Ever changing shadows transform the cabin’s surface throughout the day as each seed stitch tile is gently curved to receive the sun and cast shadows. Image © Matthew Millman

Over 4,500 3D-printed ceramic tiles clad the majority of the building. The calibrated inconsistencies and material behavior make each tile unique. Ever changing shadows transform the cabin’s surface throughout the day as each seed stitch tile is gently curved to receive the sun and cast shadows. Image © Matthew Millman

The project integrates two types of tiles on the exterior: a “planter” tile on the gable ends, and a shingled “seed stitch” tile wrapping the side walls and roof. The planter tiles offer 3D-printed ceramic shapes that include pockets for vegetation to grow. The seed stitch tiles, borrowing from knitting terminology, are produced through a deliberately rapid printing process that utilizes G-code processing to control each line of clay for a more “handmade” aesthetic. No two tiles are the same, offering unique shadow lines across the facade.

The cabin interior features translucent white Chroma Curl wall tiles, made of a bio-based plastic derived from corn. These tiles offer a customized relief texture inspired by the tradition of pressed metal ceilings, which historically relied on mass production through mold-making.

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The interior displays 3D printed curiosities, from ceramic vessels, material experiments, and studies. Color changing LED lights, which illuminate the interior through the 3D-printed bio-plastic interior cladding, set a playful mood. 3D-printed furniture and accessories include a pink Picoroco Lamp, coffee table, Coffee-Coffee kettle and cup, and a chair. Image © Matthew Millman

The interior displays 3D printed curiosities, from ceramic vessels, material experiments, and studies. Color changing LED lights, which illuminate the interior through the 3D-printed bio-plastic interior cladding, set a playful mood. 3D-printed furniture and accessories include a pink Picoroco Lamp, coffee table, Coffee-Coffee kettle and cup, and a chair. Image © Matthew Millman

It might be too soon to tell, but the 3D-Printed Cabin might be our generation’s version of Muuratsalo, Alvar Aalto’s classic house circa 1953 experimenting with textured material and architectural form through its construction. “We’re building this from our kitchen table, printing parts and testing solutions in real time,” said San Fratello.

The cabin is a departure from other investigations in 3D-printed dwellings, many of which are unlivable and not aesthetically considered. “These are not just investigations into testing materials for longevity or for structure, but also a study of aesthetics. We see the future as being elegant, optimistic, and beautiful,” said Rael.

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