Futudesign Wins Competition to Transform Saarinen’s Railway Station Into Hotel

Futudesign Wins Competition to Transform Saarinen's Railway Station Into Hotel, Courtesy of Futudesign
Courtesy of Futudesign

Finland based Futudesign has been announced as the winner of a competition which invited firms to repurpose part of the Helsinki Central Railway Station. The design, which will transform the station’s underutilized eastern wing into a hotel, both reinterprets and modernizes Eliel Saarinen’s original architectural intent.

Second Floor PlanThird Floor PlanFourth Floor PlanFifth Floor Plan+ 16

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Courtesy of Futudesign

Courtesy of Futudesign

At the time of the train station’s completion in 1914, Saarinen’s designs were referencing the stylistic transformation he was experiencing at this particular moment in his career- from a national romantic zeitgeist to that of one being influenced by the Arts & Crafts style and the Vienna Secession movement. This new extension is a continuation and reinterpretation of the courtyard’s formal logic.

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Courtesy of Futudesign

Courtesy of Futudesign

By pushing back the façade, the two ends of the original building will be exposed, providing a clear separation for the hotel intervention and the train station. The hotel will fill in the space between the two existing buildings and create a new courtyard space with a curved facade as a result. The exterior materials will also pay homage to Saarinen’s design by creating a “subtle dialogue between the old and the new.”

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Ground Floor Plan

Ground Floor Plan
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Site Plan

Site Plan

The lower level, designed with tall arched windows which reference Saarinen’s original station, will contain a variety of public spaces for train station passengers to quickly grab a cup of coffee or work in a quiet space.

Each hotel room will take on its own distinctive form which is connected through a large central corridor that runs through the building and allows for views into the courtyard and a large atrium at the center allows for natural light to filter through the building.

The project is expected to be completed in 2020.

  • Architects

  • Location

    Kaivokatu 1, 00100 Helsinki, Finland
  • Lead Architects

    Auvo Lindroos, Teemu Seppänen, Iikka Airas, Aleksi Niemeläinen, Veikka Entelä, Patrick Perämäki, Fanni Suvila, Tiina Teräs
  • Structural Engineer

    Jukka Ala-Ojala, Topi Valtonen, Wise Group Finland Oy
  • Area

    4200.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017

News via: Futudesign.

Pendant lamp / contemporary / aluminum / by Elio Martinelli CONO cod.1861

Pendant lamp / contemporary / aluminum / by Elio Martinelli CONO cod.1861  Martinelli Luce Spa

Characteristics

  • Type:

    pendant

  • Style:

    contemporary

  • Material:

    aluminum

  • Designer:

    by Elio Martinelli

Description

Hanging lamp for direct light, lacquered aluminium structure in different colors: white (1861/BI – 1861/J/BI), black (1861/RO – 1861/J/RO) or red (1861/RO – 1861/J/RO). Available in two diameters: 30cm e 45cm..

This item is available in the following countries:
EUROPE

Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Reveal New Campus for Norway’s Largest Geotechnical Specialist Community

Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Reveal New Campus for Norway’s Largest Geotechnical Specialist Community, Exterior View. Image Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Exterior View. Image Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects has revealed the design of a new campus complex for the Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Norway’s largest geotechnical specialist community, to be built in Northern Oslo.

The 30,000-square-meter (323,000-square-foot) complex will be comprised of two new buildings linked by a common entrance podium and a series of elevated walk- and bikeways. Aimed at housing up to 300 new employees, the NGI is envisioned as a new “knowledge axis” that will spawn increased pedestrian and bicycle traffic in the coming years.

Atrium View. Image Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen ArchitectsSketch. Image Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen ArchitectsSite Plan. Image Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen ArchitectsSection. Image Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects+ 10

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Atrium View. Image Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

Atrium View. Image Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

The buildings will house “sustainable and flexible frameworks” for staff and visiting clients to attract new start-up companies both inside and outside the geoscience industry. The architecture inside will cater to these formal and informal meeting with a open yet dynamic layout. Approximately 20 percent of the campus will be open to the public, including cafes, shops, meeting spaces and an expansive new green space that will integrate into the existing neighborhood.

“The campus is designed with a modern expression and a strong identity with respect to its context,” commented Kim Holst Jensen, senior partner at Schmidt Hammer Lassen. “The campus buildings will stand prominently in the local skyline and will reciprocate the voluminous Ullevål Stadion, Norway’s national football stadium located directly across the street.”

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Sketch. Image Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

Sketch. Image Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
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Section. Image Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

Section. Image Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

The larger of the two buildings will be organized around a central, “panoptic” space to create visual connections between each of the floors, allowing researchers to glance into the advanced laboratory work taking place throughout the building. Other program elements include a dining hall, offices, meeting rooms, courtyards and below-ground parking.

Large, framed opening direct views out of the building, as well as allow an abundance of natural light to penetrate into the interior, while green roofs, terraces and solar panel systems will clad the horizontal surfaces of the exterior. The entire complex is striving for high environmental sustainability standards in accordance with the Breeam NOR environmental certification.

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Site Plan. Image Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

Site Plan. Image Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
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Section. Image Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

Section. Image Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

SHL is working with local practice SJ Architects on the project. Work on the project will occur while the existing campus remains in operation.

News via Schmidt Hammer Lassen.

Amazon Names 20 Cities as Finalists for New Headquarters

Amazon Names 20 Cities as Finalists for New Headquarters, © Flickr user joebehr licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0
© Flickr user joebehr licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

Amazon has announced the list of 20 finalists in the running to become the new home city for their highly hyped second headquarters, known as HQ2.

The tech company, based in Seattle, selected the finalists from more than 238 applications from cities located in Mexico, Canada and the United States, each hoping to raise their global profile and jump start their individual economies with the 50,000 new jobs the company says it would create.

The finalist cities include:

  • Toronto
  • Columbus
  • Indianapolis
  • Chicago
  • Denver
  • Nashville
  • Los Angeles
  • Dallas
  • Austin
  • Boston
  • New York City
  • Newark
  • Pittsburgh
  • Philadelphia
  • Montgomery County
  • Washington D.C.
  • Raleigh
  • Northern Virginia
  • Atlanta
  • Miami

See the full announcement here, and learn more about the process here.

Why the AIA is NOT Awarding Anyone the Twenty-Five Year Award in 2018

Why the AIA is NOT Awarding Anyone the Twenty-Five Year Award in 2018, © Koji Horiuchi. Courtesy of AIA
© Koji Horiuchi. Courtesy of AIA

We are starting the new year with an announcement from the American Institute of Architects that there will be no winner for their Twenty-five Year Award in 2018. This will be the first time this has occurred since the award was officially established in 1971. The AIA award recognises buildings that have “stood the test of time for 25-35 years and continues to set the standards of excellence for its architectural design and significance.”

Over the 46 years of the award, it has celebrated buildings by of Frank Lloyd Wright, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Louis Kahn and Charles and Ray Eames. Last year it was awarded to the Grand Louvre – Phase I by Pei Cobb Freed & Partners for its iconic stainless steel pyramid that “rivals the Eiffel Tower as one of France’s most recognisable architectural icons.”

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Salk Institute by Louis Kahn, one of the previous winners of the award.. Image © Liao Yusheng

Salk Institute by Louis Kahn, one of the previous winners of the award.. Image © Liao Yusheng

The AIA released the following statement: “The jury felt that there were submissions that appeal to architects and there were those that appeal to the public. The consensus was that the Twenty-five Year Award should appeal to both. Unfortunately, this year the jury did not find a submission that it felt achieved twenty-five years of exceptional aesthetic and cultural relevance while also representing the timelessness and positive impact the profession aspires to achieve.”

This year’s jury included architects from Hartman-Cox Architects, Duvall Decker Architects, Strata Architecture + Preservation, Shyft Collective, KSS Architects, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, Grace Farms Foundation and Rogers Partners, chaired by Lee Becker, a fellow of the AIA.

News Via: Architect Magazine

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