Four Projects Shortlisted for 2017 Moriyama RAIC International Prize

Four Projects Shortlisted for 2017 Moriyama RAIC International Prize , 8 House, Copenhagen, Denmark / BIG (Bjarke Ingels Group). Image © Dragor Lufto
8 House, Copenhagen, Denmark / BIG (Bjarke Ingels Group). Image © Dragor Lufto
 

The Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC) has announced the four projects shortlisted for the2017 Moriyama RAIC International Prize. The prize was established in 2014 by Canadian architectRaymond Moriyama along with RAIC and the RAIC Foundation to recognise buildings that are judged to be ” transformative within its societal context and reflect Moriyama’s conviction that great architecture transforms society by promoting social justice and humanistic values of respect and inclusiveness.”

“These projects celebrate human life and shape activity,” commented RAIC President Ewa Bieniecka, FIRAC. “They embody innovation, contribute to how we experience space, and explore how spaces allow opportunities for freedom. The four shortlisted projects demonstrate how architecture is generous and gives back to the community. These works have a strong sense of place and connect to their surrounding landscape.”

Awarded every two years, the winning project will receive a CAD $100,000 prize and a handcrafted sculpture by Canadian designer Wei Yew. The prize is open to all architects, irrespective of nationality and location. The inaugural prize was won by Chinese architect Li Xiaodong for his design of the Liyuan Library in Jiaojiehe, China.

See the shortlisted projects, after the break.

Melbourne School of Design, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia / John Wardle Architects and NADAAA. Image © Peter Bennetts“The Village Architect”, Shobac Campus, Upper Kingsburg, Nova Scotia, Canada / MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects. Image © James Brittain8 House, Copenhagen, Denmark / BIG (Bjarke Ingels Group). Image © Bjarne TuliniusFuji Kindergarten, Tokyo, Japan / Tezuka Architects. Image © Tezuka Architects+35

Project and firm descriptions via RAIC.

8 House, Copenhagen, Denmark / BIG (Bjarke Ingels Group)

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8 House, Copenhagen, Denmark / BIG (Bjarke Ingels Group). Image © Bjarne Tulinius

8 House, Copenhagen, Denmark / BIG (Bjarke Ingels Group). Image © Bjarne Tulinius
 

8 House is a mixed-use residential building located in the neighborhood of Ørestad South, outside of Copenhagen, situated beside a canal with views of the Kalvebod Fælled fields. With 475 units that vary in size and layout, the building meets the needs of people in all of life’s stages: young and old, families and single people, growing and shrinking households. Within the 61,994-square-meter building, the tranquility of suburban life goes hand-in-hand with the energy of a big city. Common areas and facilities are linked by a universally accessible sidewalk that functions as a major artery connecting each of the residential units with the urban fabric, including offices, a kindergarten, and a café, on the ground floor. The structure’s bow shape allows apartments to benefit from natural light, air, and exterior views. Instead of providing car parking, 8 House prioritizes ease of access to public transit and bike paths.

“This is a bold and beautifully integrated mix of multigenerational housing and universally accessible design,” said the jury. “8 House is a worthwhile experiment in the development of a new typology to create a vertical mixed-use community. It offers a more durable way of densifying housing while maintaining a human scale.”

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8 House, Copenhagen, Denmark / BIG (Bjarke Ingels Group). Image © Ulrik Jantzen

8 House, Copenhagen, Denmark / BIG (Bjarke Ingels Group). Image © Ulrik Jantzen
 

BIG is a group of architects, designers, and thinkers operating within the fields of architecture, urbanism, interior design, landscape design, product design, research, and development, with offices in New York City, Copenhagen, and London.

8 House, Copenhagen, Denmark / BIG (Bjarke Ingels Group). Image © Iwan Baan8 House, Copenhagen, Denmark / BIG (Bjarke Ingels Group). Image © John Horner8 House, Copenhagen, Denmark / BIG (Bjarke Ingels Group). Image © Iwan Baan8 House, Copenhagen, Denmark / BIG (Bjarke Ingels Group). Image © Iwan Baan+35

Fuji Kindergarten, Tokyo, Japan / Tezuka Architects

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Fuji Kindergarten, Tokyo, Japan / Tezuka Architects. Image © Katsuhisa Kida

Fuji Kindergarten, Tokyo, Japan / Tezuka Architects. Image © Katsuhisa Kida
 

Fuji Kindergarten is a one-story, oval-shaped kindergarten that accommodates over 600 children running around its open-air roof. Some children run more than six kilometers a day. The building complements the educational philosophy that children flourish in an open, free, and natural environment with a strong sense of community. The architectural spaces were designed at the scale of a child, creating a close relationship between the ground and rooftop levels. Three Zelkova trees grow through the structure for children to climb on. Between April and November, the sliding doors are open. There are no clear boundaries between classrooms; boxes used as furniture and 1.8-meter-tall panels indicate different areas. The principal reports that the school’s approach encourages calmness and focus, including in children with behavioral disorders. “We want the children raised here to grow into people who do not exclude anything or anyone,” say the architects.

“This is an extraordinarily positive place,” said the jury, which called the kindergarten “a giant playhouse filled with joy and energy, scaled to a broad range of the human condition. This architecture in its simplicity and uniqueness embodies a pedagogical ideology of early education. The limitless structure of the space liberates the child’s imagination.”

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Fuji Kindergarten, Tokyo, Japan / Tezuka Architects. Image © Tezuka Architects

Fuji Kindergarten, Tokyo, Japan / Tezuka Architects. Image © Tezuka Architects
 

Established in 1994 and led by Takaharu and Yui Tezuka, Tezuka Architects is a Tokyo-based firm that has built a range of apartments and houses, office and commercial buildings, and educational and community spaces.

Fuji Kindergarten, Tokyo, Japan / Tezuka Architects. Image © Katsuhisa KidaFuji Kindergarten, Tokyo, Japan / Tezuka Architects. Image © Katsuhisa KidaFuji Kindergarten, Tokyo, Japan / Tezuka Architects. Image © Tezuka ArchitectsFuji Kindergarten, Tokyo, Japan / Tezuka Architects. Image © Tezuka Architects+35

Melbourne School of Design, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia / John Wardle Architects and NADAAA 

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Melbourne School of Design, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia / John Wardle Architects and NADAAA. Image © Peter Bennetts

Melbourne School of Design, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia / John Wardle Architects and NADAAA. Image © Peter Bennetts
 

The Melbourne School of Design embraces the emerging notion that the studio is not only a room or space, but a way of learning that favors the acts of doing, making, and problem solving in a critical yet collaborative environment. In this definition, the entire building has become the studio. The structure continues a sequence of outdoor rooms arrayed across the campus through a Piranesian lacing of pathways with unusually wide corridors, which provide workspaces and the opportunity for students to be exposed to each other’s work. As an architectural school, the building is active in the education of its occupants and visitors through its clarity of materials, tectonics, and organization. It addresses the use of resources, challenges conventional means and methods of project delivery, and considers its own life-cycle implications as a building. The Melbourne School of Design has become a place where anyone can come to learn about design, education, and sustainability.

“The spatial concept of an architecture school has become the social focus of the University of Melbourne campus for all students,” said the jury. “It is a beautifully orchestrated space, thoughtfully detailed and well crafted. It redefines the educational mission by engaging students with the entire building as a collaborative learning environment.”

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Melbourne School of Design, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia / John Wardle Architects and NADAAA. Image © John Horner

Melbourne School of Design, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia / John Wardle Architects and NADAAA. Image © John Horner
 

Founded by John Wardle in 1986, Melbourne-based John Wardle Architects (JWA) has built a range of projects, from small dwellings to university buildings, museums, public spaces, high-density housing, and large commercial offices. NADAAA is a Boston and New York–based architecture and urban design firm as well as a platform for design investigation at a large scale with great geographic reach.

Melbourne School of Design, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia / John Wardle Architects and NADAAA. Image © John HornerMelbourne School of Design, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia / John Wardle Architects and NADAAA. Image © John HornerMelbourne School of Design, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia / John Wardle Architects and NADAAA. Image © John HornerMelbourne School of Design, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia / John Wardle Architects and NADAAA. Image © Peter Bennetts+35

“The Village Architect”, Shobac Campus, Upper Kingsburg, Nova Scotia, CanadaMacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects

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“The Village Architect”, Shobac Campus, Upper Kingsburg, Nova Scotia, Canada / MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects. Image © James Brittain

“The Village Architect”, Shobac Campus, Upper Kingsburg, Nova Scotia, Canada / MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects. Image © James Brittain
 

In 35 years of practice, Brian MacKay-Lyons, “the village architect,” has built more than 40 houses in the Kingsburg community. Shobac Campus has formed over 25 years in Upper Kingsburg, along the Nova Scotia coastline. With the help of friends, neighbors, and colleagues, MacKay-Lyons cleared the forest, revealing historic ruins and uncovering 400 years of agrarian history. In 1994, he gathered a group of architecture students for a two-week event with the aim of reconnecting with the master-builder tradition and focusing on the timeless values of landscape, building, and community. They erected the first structure, mirroring an archetypal farmhouse. This became a tradition that continued for 12 successive years, resulting in the addition of new structures. What began as a design/build laboratory has evolved into a place for community events, a school, and a studio for local building practice. Integrating practice and teaching, family and community, Shobac Campus is an argument for landscape stewardship through agricultural and architectural cultivation.

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“The Village Architect”, Shobac Campus, Upper Kingsburg, Nova Scotia, Canada / MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects. Image © William Green

“The Village Architect”, Shobac Campus, Upper Kingsburg, Nova Scotia, Canada / MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects. Image © William Green
 

“In this age of specialization, this contrarian initiative questions the architect’s accepted role, and suggests a broadening rather than a narrowing of the current scope of practice,” said the jury. “In so doing, the architect is reestablished at the center rather than at the periphery of critical decision making.”

MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects is based in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Led by Brian MacKay-Lyons and Talbot Sweetapple, the practice works locally and internationally on cultural, academic, and residential projects, providing full architectural and interior design services.

“The Village Architect”, Shobac Campus, Upper Kingsburg, Nova Scotia, Canada / MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects. Image © James Brittain“The Village Architect”, Shobac Campus, Upper Kingsburg, Nova Scotia, Canada / MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects. Image © James Brittain“The Village Architect”, Shobac Campus, Upper Kingsburg, Nova Scotia, Canada / MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects. Image © James Brittain“The Village Architect”, Shobac Campus, Upper Kingsburg, Nova Scotia, Canada / MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects. Image © William Green+35

The jury for the 2017 Moriyama RAIC International Prize consists of:

  • Monica Adair, MRAIC: Co-founder of Acre Architects and 2015 Recipient of the RAIC Young Architect Award.
  • Manon Asselin, MRAIC: Co-founder of Atelier TAG and Associate Professor of Architecture at the University of Montreal.
  • Bryan Avery, MBE: Founder of Avery Associates Architects, author, and lecturer.
  • George Baird, FRAIC: Founding Principal of Baird Sampson Neuert Architects; former Dean of the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design at the University of Toronto; and 2010 Recipient of the RAIC Gold Medal.
  • Peter Cardew, FRAIC: Founder of Peter Cardew Architects and 2012 Recipient of the RAIC Gold Medal.
  • Barry Johns, FRAIC: Jury Chair and Chancellor of the RAIC College of Fellows.
  • Li Xiaodong, Hon. FAIA: Winner of the inaugural Moriyama RAIC International Prize.
  • David Covo, FRAIC, Associate Professor of Architecture at McGill University, is the Professional Advisor to the jury.

News via RAIC.

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RIBA Announces 2017 London Regional Award Winners

RIBA Announces 2017 London Regional Award Winners, © Luc Boegly + Sergio Grazia. ImageThe Design Museum and Holland Green / Allies and Morrison with OMA and John Pawson.
© Luc Boegly + Sergio Grazia. ImageThe Design Museum and Holland Green / Allies and Morrison with OMA and John Pawson.

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has named 50 projects as winners of 2017 RIBA LondonRegional Awards, including the London Building of the Year, “Photography Studio for Juergen Teller” by 6a architects.

“The year has demonstrated once again the breadth of the capital’s architectural output at the very high level that the RIBA programme requires, and the juries took enormous pleasure in selecting a most exemplary set of schemes,” said Jury chair Matthew Lloyd.

Selected from a 85-strong shortlist, these 50 projects will now go on to compete in RIBA’s National Awards program, the winners of which will create the shortlist for the RIBA Stirling Prize – the highest award for architecture in the UK.

© Iwan Baan. ImageTate Modern Switch House / Herzog & de Meuron© Jack Hobhouse. ImageThe Bartlett School of Architecture / Hawkins\Brown© Luke Hayes. ImageMathematics – The Winton Gallery / Zaha Hadid Architects© Lawrence Carlos. ImageHome Studio, Kilburn Lane / Studio McLeod+51

1 King William Street / AHMM

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© Timothy Soar. Image1 King William Street / AHMM

© Timothy Soar. Image1 King William Street / AHMM

40 Chancery Lane / Bennetts Associates

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© Allan Crow. Image40 Chancery Lane / Bennetts Associates

© Allan Crow. Image40 Chancery Lane / Bennetts Associates

5-7 St Helen’s Place with The Leathersellers’ Hall / Eric Parry Architects

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© Courtesy Szerelmey. Image5-7 St Helen’s Place with The Leathersellers’ Hall / Eric Parry Architects

© Courtesy Szerelmey. Image5-7 St Helen’s Place with The Leathersellers’ Hall / Eric Parry Architects

55 Victoria Street / Stiff + Trevillion with Pozzoni

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© Kilian O'Sullivan. Image55 Victoria Street / Stiff + Trevillion with Pozzoni

© Kilian O’Sullivan. Image55 Victoria Street / Stiff + Trevillion with Pozzoni

6 Wood Lane / Birds Portchmouth Russum Architects

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© Magdalena Pietrzyk. Image6 Wood Lane / Birds Portchmouth Russum Architects

© Magdalena Pietrzyk. Image6 Wood Lane / Birds Portchmouth Russum Architects

8 Finsbury Circus / WilkinsonEyre

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© Dirk Lidner. Image8 Finsbury Circus / WilkinsonEyre

© Dirk Lidner. Image8 Finsbury Circus / WilkinsonEyre

Barretts Grove / Amin Taha + Groupwork

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© Tim Soar. ImageBarretts Grove / Amin Taha + Groupwork

© Tim Soar. ImageBarretts Grove / Amin Taha + Groupwork

Belarusian Memorial Chapel / Spheron Architects

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© Joakim Boren. ImageBelarusian Memorial Chapel / Spheron Architects

© Joakim Boren. ImageBelarusian Memorial Chapel / Spheron Architects

Boxpark Croydon / BDP

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© Nick Caville. ImageBoxpark Croydon / BDP

© Nick Caville. ImageBoxpark Croydon / BDP

Brentford Lock West / Mikhail Riches Ltd

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© Mark Hadden. ImageBrentford Lock West / Mikhail Riches Ltd

© Mark Hadden. ImageBrentford Lock West / Mikhail Riches Ltd

Dujardin Mews / Karakusevic Carson with Maccreanor Lavington

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© Mark Hadden. ImageDujardin Mews / Karakusevic Carson with Maccreanor Lavington

© Mark Hadden. ImageDujardin Mews / Karakusevic Carson with Maccreanor Lavington

Feilden Fowles’ Studio / Feilden Fowles Architects

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© David Grandorge. ImageFeilden Fowles’ Studio / Feilden Fowles Architects

© David Grandorge. ImageFeilden Fowles’ Studio / Feilden Fowles Architects

Grand Union Studios – The Ladbroke Grove / AHMM

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© Timothy Soar. ImageGrand Union Studios – The Ladbroke Grove / AHMM

© Timothy Soar. ImageGrand Union Studios – The Ladbroke Grove / AHMM

Hidden House / Coffey Architects

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© Timothy Soar. ImageHidden House / Coffey Architects

© Timothy Soar. ImageHidden House / Coffey Architects

Highgate House / Carmody Groarke

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© Hélène Binet. ImageHighgate House / Carmody Groarke

© Hélène Binet. ImageHighgate House / Carmody Groarke

Highgate Junior School / Architype

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© Dennis Gilbert. ImageHighgate Junior School / Architype

© Dennis Gilbert. ImageHighgate Junior School / Architype

Home Studio, Kilburn Lane / Studio McLeod

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© Lawrence Carlos. ImageHome Studio, Kilburn Lane / Studio McLeod

© Lawrence Carlos. ImageHome Studio, Kilburn Lane / Studio McLeod

King’s College School / Allies and Morrison

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© Nick Guttridge. ImageKing's College School / Allies and Morrison

© Nick Guttridge. ImageKing’s College School / Allies and Morrison

Marie’s Wardrobe / Tsuruta Architects

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© Tim Crocker. ImageMarie’s Wardrobe / Tsuruta Architects

© Tim Crocker. ImageMarie’s Wardrobe / Tsuruta Architects

Mathematics – The Winton Gallery / Zaha Hadid Architects

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© Luke Hayes. ImageMathematics – The Winton Gallery / Zaha Hadid Architects

© Luke Hayes. ImageMathematics – The Winton Gallery / Zaha Hadid Architects

New Cancer Centre at Guy’s Hospital / Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

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© Mark Gorton. ImageNew Cancer Centre at Guy’s Hospital / Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

© Mark Gorton. ImageNew Cancer Centre at Guy’s Hospital / Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

New Scotland Yard / AHMM

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© Timothy Soar. ImageNew Scotland Yard / AHMM

© Timothy Soar. ImageNew Scotland Yard / AHMM

New Studios, Wimbledon College of Arts / Penoyre and Prasad

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© Tim Crocker. ImageNew Studios, Wimbledon College of Arts / Penoyre and Prasad

© Tim Crocker. ImageNew Studios, Wimbledon College of Arts / Penoyre and Prasad

No. 49 / 31/44 Architects

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© Anna Stathaki. ImageNo. 49 / 31/44 Architects

© Anna Stathaki. ImageNo. 49 / 31/44 Architects

Paradise Gardens / Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands

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© Paul Riddle. ImageParadise Gardens / Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands

© Paul Riddle. ImageParadise Gardens / Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands

Park Heights / PRP

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© Richard Chivers. ImagePark Heights / PRP

© Richard Chivers. ImagePark Heights / PRP

Photography Studio for Juergen Teller / 6a architects

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© Johan Dehlin. ImagePhotography Studio for Juergen Teller / 6a architects

© Johan Dehlin. ImagePhotography Studio for Juergen Teller / 6a architects

Redchurch Street / vPPR Architects

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© Ioana Marinescu. ImageRedchurch Street / vPPR Architects

© Ioana Marinescu. ImageRedchurch Street / vPPR Architects

Science Museum Research Centre / Coffey Architects

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© Timothy Soar. ImageScience Museum Research Centre / Coffey Architects

© Timothy Soar. ImageScience Museum Research Centre / Coffey Architects

Silchester / Haworth Tompkins

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© Philip Vile. ImageSilchester / Haworth Tompkins

© Philip Vile. ImageSilchester / Haworth Tompkins

St John’s Hill, Burridge Gardens, Phase 01 / Hawkins\Brown

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© Jack Hobhouse. ImageSt John’s Hill, Burridge Gardens, Phase 01 / Hawkins\Brown

© Jack Hobhouse. ImageSt John’s Hill, Burridge Gardens, Phase 01 / Hawkins\Brown

Sun Rain Room / Tonkin Liu

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© Alex Peacock. ImageSun Rain Room / Tonkin Liu

© Alex Peacock. ImageSun Rain Room / Tonkin Liu

Tapestry Building / Niall McLaughlin Architects with Weedon Partnership

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© Nick Kane. ImageTapestry Building / Niall McLaughlin Architects with Weedon Partnership

© Nick Kane. ImageTapestry Building / Niall McLaughlin Architects with Weedon Partnership

Tate Modern Switch House / Herzog & de Meuron

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© Iwan Baan. ImageTate Modern Switch House / Herzog & de Meuron

© Iwan Baan. ImageTate Modern Switch House / Herzog & de Meuron

The Bartlett School of Architecture / Hawkins\Brown

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© Jack Hobhouse. ImageThe Bartlett School of Architecture / Hawkins\Brown

© Jack Hobhouse. ImageThe Bartlett School of Architecture / Hawkins\Brown

The British Museum World Conservation and Exhibitions Centre / Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

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© Joas Souza. ImageThe British Museum World Conservation and Exhibitions Centre / Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

© Joas Souza. ImageThe British Museum World Conservation and Exhibitions Centre / Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

The Cooperage / Chris Dyson Architects

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© Peter Landers. ImageThe Cooperage / Chris Dyson Architects

© Peter Landers. ImageThe Cooperage / Chris Dyson Architects

The Design Museum and Holland Green / Allies and Morrison with OMA and John Pawson

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© Sebastian van Damme. ImageThe Design Museum and Holland Green / Allies and Morrison with OMA and John Pawson.

© Sebastian van Damme. ImageThe Design Museum and Holland Green / Allies and Morrison with OMA and John Pawson.

The Fetal Medicine Center (Windsor Walk) / A21 Architects 

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© Adam Scott. ImageThe Fetal Medicine Center (Windsor Walk) / A21 Architects

© Adam Scott. ImageThe Fetal Medicine Center (Windsor Walk) / A21 Architects

The Green, Nunhead / AOC Architecture Ltd

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© Tim Soar. ImageThe Green Nunhead / AOC Architecture Ltd

© Tim Soar. ImageThe Green Nunhead / AOC Architecture Ltd

The Laboratory, Dulwich College / Grimshaw

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© Daniel Shearing. ImageThe Laboratory, Dulwich College / Grimshaw

© Daniel Shearing. ImageThe Laboratory, Dulwich College / Grimshaw

The Layered Gallery / Gianni Botsford Architects Ltd

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© Luigi Parise. ImageThe Layered Gallery / Gianni Botsford Architects Ltd

© Luigi Parise. ImageThe Layered Gallery / Gianni Botsford Architects Ltd

The Library at Willesden Green / AHMM

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© Timothy Soar. ImageThe Library at Willesden Green / AHMM

© Timothy Soar. ImageThe Library at Willesden Green / AHMM

The Loom / Duggan Morris Architects

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© Jack Hobhouse. ImageThe Loom / Duggan Morris Architects

© Jack Hobhouse. ImageThe Loom / Duggan Morris Architects

Tyers Street, Cabinet Gallery / Trevor Horne Architects

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© Tim Crocker. ImageTyers Street, Cabinet Gallery / Trevor Horne Architects

© Tim Crocker. ImageTyers Street, Cabinet Gallery / Trevor Horne Architects

Valentino London / David Chipperfield

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© Santi Caleca. ImageValentino London / David Chipperfield

© Santi Caleca. ImageValentino London / David Chipperfield

Vantage Point / GRID architects

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© Morley von Sternberg. ImageVantage Point / GRID architects

© Morley von Sternberg. ImageVantage Point / GRID architects

Walmer Yard / Peter Salter and Associates with Mole Architects and John Comparelli Architects

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© Hélène Binet. ImageWalmer Yard / Peter Salter and Associates with Mole Architects and John Comparelli Architects

© Hélène Binet. ImageWalmer Yard / Peter Salter and Associates with Mole Architects and John Comparelli Architects

West Croydon Bus Station / Transport for London

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© Alex Upton. ImageWest Croydon Bus Station / Transport for London

© Alex Upton. ImageWest Croydon Bus Station / Transport for London

Whole House / Hayhurst and Co.

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© Marcus Peel. ImageWhole House / Hayhurst and Co.

© Marcus Peel. ImageWhole House / Hayhurst and Co.

In addition, special recognition was given to:

  • Regional Building of the Year: Photography Studio for Juergen Teller / 6a architects
  • Sustainability: New Studios, Wimbledon College of Arts / Penoyre & Prasad
  • Regional Project Architect of the Year: Martin Eriksson from Transport for London (West Croydon Bus Station)
  • Regional Client of the Year: London Borough of Enfield – Dujardin Mews / Karakusevic Carson Architects
  • Regional Small Project of the Year: No 49 / 31/44 Architects

News via RIBA.

China’s Shenzhen Waterfront to be Transformed by Laguarda.Low Masterplan

China’s Shenzhen Waterfront to be Transformed by Laguarda.Low Masterplan, Courtesy of Laguarda.Low Architects
Courtesy of Laguarda.Low Architects

New York-based firm Laguarda.Low are set to transform the Bao’an district in Shenzhen, China with a 128-acre large-scale waterfront masterplan. Located 13 miles west of Shenzhen city center, and less than an hour’s drive from Hong Kong, OCT Bao’an will encompass dynamic spaces for business, retail, andentertainment. Designed in collaboration with landscape firm SWA, the Laguarda.Low scheme integrates nature, recreation, and culture in a new urban setting, a vision which was awarded first place in an international competition.

Courtesy of Laguarda.Low ArchitectsCourtesy of Laguarda.Low ArchitectsCourtesy of Laguarda.Low ArchitectsCourtesy of Laguarda.Low Architects+7

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Courtesy of Laguarda.Low Architects

Courtesy of Laguarda.Low Architects
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Courtesy of Laguarda.Low Architects

Courtesy of Laguarda.Low Architects

OCT Bao’an will be divided into four primary zones – a new Urban Business District, a multi-levelRetail Park, a Culture Heritage Park, and a Book Market – all connected by a combination of pedestrian paths, integrated waterscapes, and landscaped promenades. The multi-level retail village will occupy the center of the development, surrounded by residential and office towers, a hotel, an indoor mall, and exhibition facility.

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Courtesy of Laguarda.Low Architects

Courtesy of Laguarda.Low Architects
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Courtesy of Laguarda.Low Architects

Courtesy of Laguarda.Low Architects

The Urban Business District to the south end of the site will include seven 13-storey office buildings and a 13-storey hotel. The tiered glass structures will serve as a backdrop to the waterfront development, with landscaped terraces and green roofs to collect rainwater and limit solar heat gain. To the east, a retail park will feature large domed skylights merging the line between indoor and outdoor space. The four-story retail park elevates the traditional shopping experience with natural light, dynamic circulation, and expansive green spaces.

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Courtesy of Laguarda.Low Architects

Courtesy of Laguarda.Low Architects

At the north end of the site, the Cultural Heritage Park offers a range of leisure and entertainment facilities, including a retail center, open-air plaza, and performing arts center. Water serves as a key element of the scheme, separating various aquatic activities whilst allowing the public to explore the waterfront by boat.

The Book Market zone lies on the eastern side of the development, adjacent to a new library and youth center. The subterranean space contains a multi-level bookstore and food hall, with a landscaped park surrounding a dramatic skylight above.

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Courtesy of Laguarda.Low Architects

Courtesy of Laguarda.Low Architects

News via: Laguarda.Low.

DELVA Landscape Architects to Revive The Hague’s Historic Centre With Interconnected Urban Greens

DELVA Landscape Architects to Revive The Hague’s Historic Centre With Interconnected Urban Greens , via DELVA Landscape Architects / Urbanism
via DELVA Landscape Architects / Urbanism

Serving as a new gateway to the city through the connection of various green spaces and public programs, The Green Entrance is DELVA Landscape Architects’ masterplan for a historic district of The Hague. Given The Hague’s future inner-city densification, which involves the creation of 50,000 new houses, the Dutch firm’s aim is to aid these developments through sustainable and green urban strategies, manifested “through an integral approach between landscape design, cultural heritage, mobility, programming and technology.”

Commenting on the project’s primary function, the architects state: “’The Green Entrance’ connects areas that have been isolated over the years. It starts in the spacious and open ‘City Hall’ that connects to the train station and continues to the ‘Koningin Julianaplein’. No narrow doors or gates, but a wide view over the green and lively surrounding public space.”

via DELVA Landscape Architects / Urbanismvia DELVA Landscape Architects / Urbanismvia DELVA Landscape Architects / Urbanismvia DELVA Landscape Architects / Urbanism+18

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via DELVA Landscape Architects / Urbanism

via DELVA Landscape Architects / Urbanism
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via DELVA Landscape Architects / Urbanism

via DELVA Landscape Architects / Urbanism

The site’s surrounding area, known as the Central Innovation District, is regarded as a knowledge hub, as a home to a number of government agencies, NGOs, the Museum District, as well as The Hague Central Station, which channels the main influx of commuters and visitors. The master plan directly engages this starting point, while tying together four distinct areas: the ‘Koningin Julianaplein’ (Queen Juliana Square), the ‘Koekamp’ (deer camp), the ‘Koninklijk Stadspark’ (Royal City Park) and the ‘Malieveld’ (Malie Field).

Beginning their experience with the Koningin Julianaplein while departing the station, visitors will be greeted with a large public green square at the base of the station. This works in tandem with the newly designed City Hall, which reinforces The Hague’s international reputation as a city and also houses restaurants, bars, and retail stores. Integrated green dunes will link the square with the adjacent park, while there are also 8,500 spaces of underground parking for those arriving by bicycle.

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via DELVA Landscape Architects / Urbanism

via DELVA Landscape Architects / Urbanism
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via DELVA Landscape Architects / Urbanism

via DELVA Landscape Architects / Urbanism

Key to the public square is a pavilion, located strategically on the northeast corner to maximize solar gain with its terrace. A social and active space is created as soon as the public leaves the neighboring station and high-rise buildings, while the pavilion further reinforces the relationship with the existingpark, which also has a similar hospitality pavilion for ticketing and tourism purposes.

Historically, the Malieveld, Koekamp and Haagse Bos have been integral elements of the city’s urban identity, the latter of which is a rectangular forested park. Designed in 1839 by renowned Dutch landscape architect J.D. Zocher Jr., the Koekamp is at the heart of DELVA’s proposed scheme, also housing the revitalized historical structures of the National Forest Management Agency. The agency’s base is surrounded by water to create an island that will “function as a recreational stepping stone from the city centre to the Haagse Bos.” Circulation paths for bicyclists and pedestrians will link the deer camp to the surrounding park and an overhead bridge will restore the royal axis of ‘Huis ten Bosch’ and ‘Paleis Noordeinde’.

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via DELVA Landscape Architects / Urbanism

via DELVA Landscape Architects / Urbanism
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via DELVA Landscape Architects / Urbanism

via DELVA Landscape Architects / Urbanism

DELVA has also introduced the Malie Sports Track to the existing open Malie Field, catering to a number of outdoor sports. Inspired by a famous De Stijl work of Piet Mondiraan, the multicolored track also injects public art into the program, while using dynamic lighting that responds to user interaction and movement within the space.

A subproject of ‘City Entrances’ program, The Green Entrance is to be completed in incremental phases, beginning with the Koningin Julianaplein in 2019. This will be well in time for the addition of the 50,000 houses as part of The Hague’s larger densification plan, which is to be achieved by 2025.

News via: DELVA Landscape Architects.

James Corner Field Operations’ To Lead Much Needed Revitalisation of Hong Kong’s Waterfront

James Corner Field Operations’ To Lead Much Needed Revitalisation of Hong Kong’s Waterfront , via James Corner Field Operations
via James Corner Field Operations

With decaying infrastructure and a lack of viable public amenities, Hong Kong’s popular yet problematic waterfront is the focus of James Corner Field Operations’ latest undertaking, aiming to transform the site into an attractive tourist and local destination. The equivalent of Hollywood’s Walk of Fame, Hong Kong’s Avenue of Stars and the Tsim Sha Tsui (TST) waterfront are in need of severe revitalisation, with areas requiring demolition if not reinforced within the decade.

The landscape architecture firm’s vision incorporates new seating, shading and green space to reinvigorate the promenade while offering panoramic views of the city’s skyline as it guides visitors towards the harbor. Trellises will provide 800 times more shade than what is currently offered, while seating will increase 325-fold to encourage public engagement and interaction with each other and the space.

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via James Corner Field Operations

via James Corner Field Operations

In addition to the promenade built upon a seawall, the proposal stresses a strengthened waterfrontinfrastructure for the site as it serves as a wave break to minimize wave damage on the shore and reduce storm effects. The seawall is clad in custom sculpted precast concrete that encourages underwater habitation and is also composed of interlocking panels to offer additional structural strength. The effects of potential typhoons are also countered with interlocking concrete pavers to withstand submerged conditions, while the trellises form windbreaks upon the shore.

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via James Corner Field Operations

via James Corner Field Operations

Renowned for their revitalisation of the Chelsea High Line in New York, James Corner Field Operations are also currently working on a historic canal in Washington D.C. Once complete, the Tsim Sh Tsui waterfront will function as a much needed attractive public space in Hong Kong, while continuing to withstand the detrimental effects of the rising tides of climate change.

News via: James Corner Field Operations.

Urban Rural – Hybrid Habitation in the Heart of Istanbul

Urban Rural - Hybrid Habitation in the Heart of Istanbul, Urban Rural is set to become a landmark for Istanbul. Image Courtesy of Eray Carbajo
Urban Rural is set to become a landmark for Istanbul. Image Courtesy of Eray Carbajo

The American/Turkish architecture firm Eray Carbajo has unveiled Urban Rural, a new typology of urban living set to become a benchmark for future development in Istanbul, Turkey. The vision behind Urban Rural is for a hybrid model of living, combining close proximity to urban centers with the lushlandscape of rural life. Challenging the status quo of typical residential typologies, the scheme will consist of modular hexagonal units with triangular gardens, forming an active façade designed to become a future landmark for the city.

Urban Rural aims to challenge the status quo of urban living. Image Courtesy of Eray CarbajoModular hexagonal units with triangular gardens dominate the facade. Image Courtesy of Eray CarbajoModular hexagonal units with triangular gardens dominate the facade. Image Courtesy of Eray CarbajoUrban Rural is set to become a landmark for Istanbul. Image Courtesy of Eray Carbajo+6

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Urban Rural aims to challenge the status quo of urban living. Image Courtesy of Eray Carbajo

Urban Rural aims to challenge the status quo of urban living. Image Courtesy of Eray Carbajo
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Modular hexagonal units with triangular gardens dominate the facade. Image Courtesy of Eray Carbajo

Modular hexagonal units with triangular gardens dominate the facade. Image Courtesy of Eray Carbajo

The architectural form of Urban Rural is dominated by its unique, hexagonal, modular residential units. Each hexagon unit consists of a polygonal area for living, and a triangular cavity to be used as anirrigable garden. When units are combined, the triangular cavities act as a truss structure, creating an interdependency between building systems, structure, landscape, and aesthetic. Sustainability is central to the scheme, with a combination of locally sourced materials and an efficient component-based modular design enhancing the scheme’s environmental and economic viability.

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Modular hexagonal units with triangular gardens dominate the facade. Image Courtesy of Eray Carbajo

Modular hexagonal units with triangular gardens dominate the facade. Image Courtesy of Eray Carbajo
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Urban Rural seeks to bring the lush landscape of rural living to an urban environment. Image Courtesy of Eray Carbajo

Urban Rural seeks to bring the lush landscape of rural living to an urban environment. Image Courtesy of Eray Carbajo

Urban Rural seeks to become a city landmark following its 2019 completion. A vertical urban village in the heart of Istanbul will reduce dependency on cars and transport, instead of promoting walking and cycling. The scheme features social and recreational spaces on the lower floors, creating a vibrant hub for people to live, work, and meet.

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Urban Rural is set to become a landmark for Istanbul. Image Courtesy of Eray Carbajo

Urban Rural is set to become a landmark for Istanbul. Image Courtesy of Eray Carbajo

News via: Eray Carbajo.