Mutipurpose Classroom and Phu Chi Fah Forest Fire Control Station / Geodesic Design

Mutipurpose Classroom and Phu Chi Fah Forest Fire Control Station / Geodesic Design, © Jeerawat Chutiwattanathada
© Jeerawat Chutiwattanathada
 

© Jeerawat Chutiwattanathada © Jeerawat Chutiwattanathada © Jeerawat Chutiwattanathada © Jeerawat Chutiwattanathada +29

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© Jeerawat Chutiwattanathada

© Jeerawat Chutiwattanathada

Phu Chi Fa Forest Fire Control Station is located two hours’ ride up the mountain on the Thai-Laos border in Chiangrai, 800 kilometers from Bangkok. The station takes care of about 3,000 square kilometers forest area. Firefighters also tour schools in this area to give lectures on forest fire prevention. They need a new classroom in the station.

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© Jeerawat Chutiwattanathada

© Jeerawat Chutiwattanathada
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Exploded Axonometric

Exploded Axonometric
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© Jeerawat Chutiwattanathada

© Jeerawat Chutiwattanathada

Friends of the station raised a small fund for the classroom. Staffs and architects decided on the solution of minimum purchasing and transporting of materials from city. Firefighters also volunteered to build the classroom themselves.

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© Jeerawat Chutiwattanathada

© Jeerawat Chutiwattanathada

Walls are of red earth dug up on site mixed with cement. Roof structure is of bamboo from nearby groves. Thatching is an old local wisdom. Skylight dome is custom made in Bangkok. Moreover, other parts and details can be made locally.

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© Jeerawat Chutiwattanathada

© Jeerawat Chutiwattanathada
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© Jeerawat Chutiwattanathada

© Jeerawat Chutiwattanathada
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© Jeerawat Chutiwattanathada

© Jeerawat Chutiwattanathada

Local carpenter came in to helped ( thanks to Sla Don, Sla Kiad, Sla Udd ). They shared technics and construction traditions which were greatly appreciated.

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Floor Plan

Floor Plan
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Section

Section

The architects and the firefighters wish that locals will adapt the same use of materials and methods to build houses and other things in future.

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© Jeerawat Chutiwattanathada

© Jeerawat Chutiwattanathada

52-story SHoP-designed tower revealed for downtown Detroit

Hudson's Development by SHoP in Dowtown Detroit. (Bedrock)

Hudson’s Development by SHoP in Dowtown Detroit. (Bedrock)

New York City-based SHoP Architects, working with Detroit-based Hamilton Anderson Associates, has released new information and renderings for a two-acre site in downtown Detroit. It has been some time since we have seen any new developments for the former site of the J.L.Hudson’s Department Store, and the few renderings available, and the fewer details about what was planned for the site has had Detroiters more than a bit curious. With this latest revelation, Detroit is looking at a much larger project than initially thought.

The SHoP-designed tower will be the tallest in Detroit. (Bedrock)

The SHoP-designed tower will be the tallest in Detroit. (Bedrock)

The development is proposed to feature 1.5 million gross square feet and a 734-foot-tall tower. If built that will be the new tallest building in the city. The development lists amenities including retail, residential, parking, and a community civic space. The project will also include what is being called an “experiential destination focusing on technology, arts, and culture.”

The Development will include residential, retail, and civic space. (Bedrock)

The Development will include residential, retail, and civic space. (Bedrock)

“The driving force behind our design for the Hudson’s site is to create a building that speaks to the rebirth of optimism in the city’s future and an experiential destination that positively impacts Detroit in a meaningful way,” said William Sharples, principal at SHoP, in a press release. “The building is conceived around a huge and inspiring new public space, a year-round civic square that, both in its architecture and its culture, will foster and convey the feeling we all share when we work together to imagine what this great city can become.”

The site of the new development was once home to one of Detroit’s largest retailers, Hudsons. The 25-story department store was at one time the tallest department story in the world. At over two million square feet, it was the anchor of the thriving Woodward avenue shopping corridor. With the declining economic state of Detroit in the 1970s, not even the retail giant could survive. The store was closed in 1983 and the building eventually imploded in 1998. Bedrock, the real estate firm co-founded by Detroit native Dan Gilbert, are developing the site.

woodwardview_final

Woodward Avenue is the historic retail center of Detroit. (Bedrock)

“Our goal is to create a development that exceeds the economic and experiential impact even Hudson’s had on the city. We believe this project is so unique that it can help put Detroit back on the national – and even global – map for world-class architecture, talent attraction, technology innovation and job creation,” explained Gilbert as part of the announcement.

The Downtown Development Authority has approved a timeline which sets the ground breaking for the development on December 1st, 2017.

Bengbu Museum & Urban Planning Exhibition Center / MengArchitects

Bengbu Museum & Urban Planning Exhibition Center / MengArchitects, © Zhang Guangyuan
© Zhang Guangyuan
 

© Zhang Guangyuan© Zhang Guangyuan© Zhang Guangyuan© Zhang Guangyuan+28

  • Architects

  • Location

    Bengbu, Anhui, China
  • Directors

    Meng Jianmin, Xu Yunchao, Xing Lihua
  • Design Team

    Zhou Fu, Li Songmin, Zeng Zhi, Liu Ruiping, Li Jinpeng, Wang Qiwen, He Xiaoxue, Qi Jiachuan, Shi Shuiqing, Zhong Wenen, Du Qingxian, Fan Yelin
  • Associate Engineers

    Shenzhen General Institute of Architectural Design and Research Co., Ltd.
  • Area

    68333.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

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© Zhang Guangyuan

© Zhang Guangyuan
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© Zhang Guangyuan

© Zhang Guangyuan

From the architect. In China, urban plan usually put cultural buildings with administrative center, trying to build a political and cultural center under axis control. Consequently, the layout of cultural complex is forced to meet the political needs, and their publicity has to merge with political seriousness. While our design manages to give consideration to both symmetrical layout and solemn political image, and openness as well as closeness to people.

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© Zhang Guangyuan

© Zhang Guangyuan
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© Zhang Guangyuan

© Zhang Guangyuan

Covering an area of 68,333㎡, Bengbu Museum & Urban Planning Exhibition Center, located in Bengbu, Anhui Province, is composed of two buildings, a museum and a planning exhibition center. The design strategy is to introduce people-oriented public activity first through leaving urban green space in the north side, building urban square in the middle of the two buildings, which can satisfies the need of performing local art “flower-drum lantern” and residents’ daily entertainment.

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© Zhang Guangyuan

© Zhang Guangyuan
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Planning Pavillion Perspective Section

Planning Pavillion Perspective Section
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© Zhang Guangyuan

© Zhang Guangyuan

The facade of museum resembles the texture of rock stratum section in order to create a sense of stack-up; in the sunny atrium, suspension bridge is not only a space statue, but also an important public space. Atrium becomes an urban saloon, rather than a simple visual place. While Urban Planning Exhibition Center shows a totally different style with silver gray perforated aluminum panel. The designing of the center changes traditional sand-table viewing mode, so that visitors can look at the Bengbu Model from different angles and heights via rising spiral ramp.

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© Zhang Guangyuan

© Zhang Guangyuan

Inspired by picturesque gardens built in the Southern Song Dynasty, our design attempts to create an “roaming around” experience mode, so as to explore the possibility of ramp spatial narrative. Only with user’ participation, can the space be more significant. Imagining that people walk on the folded and roundabout ramp in the museum or spiral ramp in the exhibition hall, one can see that the combination of linear narrative mode and continuous and causal spatial sensation turns out to be marvelous experience and dramatic space construct.

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© Zhang Guangyuan

© Zhang Guangyuan
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Museum Perspective Section

Museum Perspective Section
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© Zhang Guangyuan

© Zhang Guangyuan

Francis Kéré to Design 2017 Serpentine Pavilion

Francis Kéré to Design 2017 Serpentine Pavilion, Serpentine Pavilion 2017, Designed by Francis Kéré, Design Render, Interior. Image © Kéré Architecture
Serpentine Pavilion 2017, Designed by Francis Kéré, Design Render, Interior. Image © Kéré Architecture

The Serpentine Galleries have announced that the 2017 Serpentine Pavilion will be designed by Diébédo Francis Kéré (Kéré Architecture), an African architect based between Berlin, Germany, and his home town of Gando in Burkino Faso. The design for the proposal, which will be built this summer in London’s Kensington Gardens, comprises an expansive roof supported by a steel frame, mimicking the canopy of a tree. According to Kéré, the design for the roof stems from a tree that serves as the central meeting point for life in Gando. In line with the criteria for the selection of the Serpentine Pavilion architect Kéré has yet to have realised a permanent building in England.

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Serpentine Pavilion 2017, Designed by Francis Kéré, Design Render, Exterior. Image © Kéré Architecture

Serpentine Pavilion 2017, Designed by Francis Kéré, Design Render, Exterior. Image © Kéré Architecture

According to the Serpentine Galleries: “When the sun in shining, visitors will be able to find shade underneath the canopy, or sit and bask in the courtyard that surrounds it. But on wet days, rainwater will drain down through an oculus in the pavilion’s roof structure, creating a ‘spectacular waterfall effect’, before escaping down into a drainage system hidden beneath the ground. The structure will also take on a different character by night, when its wooden walls become a source of illumination.”

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Francis Kéré. Image © Erik Jan Ouwerkerk

Francis Kéré. Image © Erik Jan Ouwerkerk

Design Statement

The proposed design for the 2017 Serpentine Pavilion is conceived as a micro cosmos – a community structure within Kensington Gardens that fuses cultural references of my home country Burkina Faso with experimental construction techniques. My experience of growing up in a remote desert village has instilled a strong awareness of the social, sustainable, and cultural implications of design. I believe that architecture has the power to, surprise, unite, and inspire all while mediating important aspects such as community, ecology and economy.

In Burkina Faso, the tree is a place where people gather together, where everyday activities play out under the shade of its branches. My design for the Serpentine Pavilion has a great over-hanging roof canopy made of steel and a transparent skin covering the structure, which allows sunlight to enter the space while also protecting it from the rain. Wooden shading elements line the underside of the roof to create a dynamic shadow effect on the interior spaces. This combination of features promotes a sense of freedom and community; like the shade of the tree branches, the Pavilion becomes a place where people can gather and share their daily experiences.

Fundamental to my architecture is a sense of openness. In the Pavilion this is achieved by the wall system, which is comprised of prefabricated wooden blocks assembled into triangular modules with slight gaps, or apertures, between them. This gives a lightness and transparency to the building enclosure. The composition of the curved walls is split into four elements, creating four different access points to the Pavilion. Detached from the roof canopy, these elements allow air to circulate freely throughout.

At the centre of the Pavilion is a large opening in the canopy, creating an immediate connection to nature. In times of rain, the roof becomes a funnel channelling water into the heart of the structure. This rain collection acts symbolically, highlighting water as a fundamental resource for human survival and prosperity.

In the evening, the canopy becomes a source of illumination. Wall perforations will give glimpses of movement and activity inside the pavilion to those outside. In my home village of Gando (Burkina Faso), it is always easy to locate a celebration at night by climbing to higher ground and searching for the source of light in the surrounding darkness. This small light becomes larger as more and more people arrive to join the event. In this way the Pavilion will become a beacon of light, a symbol of storytelling and togetherness.

Jenny Sabin Studio Selected as Winner of the MoMA PS1 2017 Young Architects Program

Jenny Sabin Studio Selected as Winner of the MoMA PS1 2017 Young Architects Program , Jenny Sabin Studio. Lumen. 2017 (rendering). Winner of the Young Architects Program 2017, MoMA PS1, New York. Image Courtesy of Jenny Sabin Studio
Jenny Sabin Studio. Lumen. 2017 (rendering). Winner of the Young Architects Program 2017, MoMA PS1, New York. Image Courtesy of Jenny Sabin Studio

Lumen by Jenny Sabin Studio has been named the winner of The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s annual Young Architects Program. Opening on June 27 in the MoMA PS1 courtyard, this year’s construction is an immersive design that evolves over the course of a day, providing a cooling respite from the midday sun and a responsive glowing light after sundown. Drawn from among five finalists, Jenny Sabin Studio’s Lumen will serve as a temporary urban landscape for the 20th season of Warm Up, MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series. Lumen will remain on view through the summer.

Now in its 18th edition, the Young Architects Program at The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 has offered emerging architectural talent the opportunity to design and present innovative projects, challenging each year’s winners to develop creative designs for a temporary, outdoor installation that provides shade, seating, and water. The architects must also work within guidelines that address environmental issues, including sustainability and recycling.

Made of responsive tubular structures in a lightweight knitted fabric, Lumen features a canopy of recycled, photo-luminescent, and solar active textiles that absorb, collect, and deliver light. A misting system responds to visitors’ proximity, activating fabric stalactites that produce a refreshing micro-climate. Socially and environmentally responsive, Lumen’s multisensory environment is inspired by collective levity, play, and interaction as the structure and materials transform throughout the day and night, adapting to the densities of bodies, heat, and sunlight.

“The Young Architects Program remains one of the most significant opportunities for architects and designers from across the country and world to build radical yet transformative ideas. This year’s finalists are no exception; their projects illustrate a diversity of approaches and refreshing ideas for architecture today,” said Sean Anderson, Associate Curator in MoMA’s Department of Architecture and Design. “Jenny Sabin’s catalytic immersive environment, Lumen, captured the jury’s attention for imaginatively merging public and private spaces. With innovative construction and design processes borne from a critical merging of technology and nature to precise attention to detail at every scale, Lumen will no doubt engage visitors from day to night in a series of graduated environments and experiences.”

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Jenny Sabin Studio. Lumen. 2017 (rendering). Winner of the Young Architects Program 2017, MoMA PS1, New York. Image Courtesy of Jenny Sabin Studio

Jenny Sabin Studio. Lumen. 2017 (rendering). Winner of the Young Architects Program 2017, MoMA PS1, New York. Image Courtesy of Jenny Sabin Studio

Klaus Biesenbach, MoMA PS1 Director and MoMA Chief Curator at Large adds, “In its 18th iteration, this annual competition offered jointly by the Architecture and Design Department at MoMA and MoMA PS1 continues to take risks and encourage experimentation among architects. Jenny Sabin’s Lumen is a socially and environmentally responsive structure that spans practices and disciplines in its exploratory approach to new materials. Held in tension within the walls of MoMA PS1’s courtyard, Lumen turns visitors into participants who interact with its responsiveness to temperature, sunlight, and movement.”

The other finalists for this year’s MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program were Bureau Spectacular (Jimenez Lai and Joanna Grant), Ania Jaworska, Office of III (Sean Canty, Ryan Golenberg and Stephanie Lin), and SCHAUM/SHIEH (Rosalyne Shieh and Troy Schaum). An exhibition of the five finalists’ proposed projects will be on view at The Museum of Modern Art over the summer, organized by Sean Anderson, Associate Curator, with Arièle Dionne-Krosnick, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art.

Bloomberg Philanthropies has supported the Young Architects Program since 2007. In 2016, MoMA PS1 and The Museum of Modern Art were thrilled to announce that this lead sponsorship had been extended for three years, enabling the Young Architects Program to thrive and excite audiences through summer 2018.

About Jenny Sabin Studio

Jenny Sabin Studio is an architectural design firm that investigates the intersections of architecture and science, biology, and mathematics. The principal, Jenny E. Sabin, is the Arthur L. and Isabel B. Wiesenberger Assistant Professor in the area of Design and Emerging Technologies and the newly-appointed Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Architecture at Cornell University. She is also the Director of the Sabin Design Lab at Cornell AAP, a trans-disciplinary design research lab with specialization in computational design, data visualization, and digital fabrication. Sabin’s awards include the AIA Henry Adams first prize medal, the Arthur Spayd Brooke gold medal, a Pew Fellowship in the Arts, a USA Knight Fellowship in Architecture, the Architectural League Prize for Young Architects and a national IVY Innovator in design. Sabin has exhibited nationally and internationally including in the 9th ArchiLab at FRAC Centre, Orleans, France and Beauty, the 5th Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial in New York City. Upcoming exhibitions include Imprimer Le Monde at the Pompidou Centre, Paris, France.

Selection Process

To choose an architectural firm for the 2017 Young Architects Program, deans of architecture schools and the editors of architecture publications nominate around 50 firms comprised of recent architectural school graduates, junior faculty, and established architects experimenting with new styles or techniques. These finalists are asked to submit portfolios of their work for review by a panel including Glenn D. Lowry, Director of The Museum of Modern Art; Kathy Halbreich, Associate Director at The Museum of Modern Art; Klaus Biesenbach, Director of MoMA PS1 and Chief Curator at Large at the Museum of Modern Art; Peter Reed, Senior Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs, The Museum of Modern Art; Martino Stierli, Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture & Design at The Museum of Modern Art; Sean Anderson, Associate Curator of Architecture at The Museum of Modern Art.

Design Team

Project lead and manager: Dillon Pranger
Design & Representation: Jingyang Liu Leo, Diego Blanco, Mark Lien
Robotic Fabrication: Andrew Moorman and Andres Gutierrez
Virtual Reality: Christopher Morse
Content Coordination: Jordan Berta
Model Assistance: Jasmine Liu
Video: Cole Skaggs
Engineering Design: Clayton Binkley, Arup
Lighting Design: Jeffrey Nash
Knit Fabrication: Shima Seiki WHOLEGARMENT
Misting Systems: Mist Cooling Inc. with special thanks to Larry Geohring

History

This year marks the 20th summer that MoMA PS1 has hosted an architectural installation and music series in its outdoor space, though it is only the 18th year of the Young Architects Program, which began in 2000. The inaugural project was an architecturally based 1998 installation by the Austrian artist collective Gelatin. In 1999, Philip Johnson’s DJ Pavilion celebrated the historic affiliation of MoMA PS1 and MoMA. The previous winners of the Young Architects Program are SHoP/Sharples Holden Pasquarelli (2000), ROY (2001), William E. Massie (2002), Tom Wiscombe / EMERGENT (2003), nARCHITECTS (2004), Xefirotarch (2005), OBRA (2006), Ball-Nogues (2007), WORKac (2008), MOS (2009), Solid Objectives – Idenburg Liu (2010), Interboro Partners (2011), HWKN (2012), CODA (2013), The Living (2014),  Andrés Jaque / Office for Political Innovation (2015), and Escobedo Soliz Studio (2016).

New York City Unveils Plans for New Fashion and Film Hub in Brooklyn

New York City Unveils Plans for New Fashion and Film Hub in Brooklyn, © WXY Architecture + Urban Design
© WXY Architecture + Urban Design
 

As rising rents have began to drive out historic garment companies from New York City’s storied Garment District in Midtown Manhattan, mayor Bill de Blasio has announced plans for a new development that would bring together the artistic fields into one creative hub in Brooklyn’s Sunset Park neighborhood. Conceived and designed by WXY architecture + urban design, the $136 million “Made in NY Campus” will provide the setting for film and television production, virtual reality tech offices, and a new home for New York’s fashion and garment manufacturing industry.

© WXY Architecture + Urban Design© WXY Architecture + Urban Design© WXY Architecture + Urban Design© WXY Architecture + Urban Design+7

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© WXY Architecture + Urban Design

© WXY Architecture + Urban Design
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© WXY Architecture + Urban Design

© WXY Architecture + Urban Design

Located on the waterfront at Bush Terminal, the new campus masterplan will be centered around two renovated industrial buildings containing a total of 200,000 square feet of garment manufacturing space, and a new, 100,000-square-foot complex featuring high ceilings and VR facilities for film and tv production. The city is hoping to draw between 25 to 35 tenants working in pattern making, cutting and sewing, as well as supporting services such as photography and educational support. A 7,500-square-foot anchor location has also been planned as a food retail and manufacturing facility.

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© WXY Architecture + Urban Design

© WXY Architecture + Urban Design
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© WXY Architecture + Urban Design

© WXY Architecture + Urban Design

New pedestrian-friendly plazas and landscapes along the 43rd street corridor will connect the various facilities, providing the comfortable community aimed at attracting expanding businesses to the area.

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© WXY Architecture + Urban Design

© WXY Architecture + Urban Design

The new complex will be integrated into the neighborhood following guidelines outlined in the Sunset Park District Plan, which seeks to renovate aging infrastructure and increase business opportunities. The Made In New York campus will join two active industrial centers, the Bush Terminal and Brooklyn Army Terminal, as the area’s industrial incubators.

You can learn more about the project here.

News via WXY Architecture + Urban Design, NYC Office of the Mayor. H/T Curbed.

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© WXY Architecture + Urban Design

Wall-hung toilet / porcelain KHROMA

Wall-hung toilet / porcelain KHROMA ROCA

Characteristics

  • Installation:

    wall-hung

  • Material:

    porcelain

Description

Colour and texture at the service of the senses. Conceived by the Austrian designer Erwin Leo Himmel, this collection has opted for intense colours to imbue the bathroom space with happiness and a free-and-easy air. What is more, its harmonious forms and textured finishes appeal to the most demanding sense of touch. Vincent Gregoire, creative manager of the renowned agency Nelly, has chosen a range of colour schemes to make this series a genuine gift for the senses.

Wall-mounted washbasin / rectangular / porcelain / contemporary DAMA SENSO

Wall-mounted washbasin / rectangular / porcelain / contemporary DAMA SENSO ROCA

Characteristics

  • Installation:

    wall-mounted

  • Shape:

    rectangular

  • Material:

    porcelain

  • Style:

    contemporary

Description

The signatures of the Germans Schmidt & Lackner appear on this extensive collection, which offers a large number of solutions for the contemporary habitat. Their proposal enables one to make the most of the space and it easily merges with any style.

German architect Wilfried Wang critiques Herzog & de Meuron’s Museum of the 20th Century extension in Berlin

(Courtesy Herzog & de Meuron / vVgt Landschaftsarchitekten AG)

(Courtesy Herzog & de Meuron / vVgt Landschaftsarchitekten AG)

Herzog & de Meuron’s winning proposal for the Museum of the 20th Century extension in Berlin has been called into question by German architect Wilfried Wang, the co-founder of Berlin-based Hoidn Wang Partner and (since 2002) the O’Neil Ford Centennial Professor at UT Austin’s School of Architecture. Wang believes the Swiss firm’s design is severely lacking in both architectural and urbanist respects.

Speaking in The Competition Project (whose editor translated Wang’s commentary, which first appeared in the German journal Bauwelt last year), Wang first discusses the project’s relationship with its immediate surroundings: Mies van der Rohe’s Neue Nationalgalerie (completed in 1968) and the Hans Scharoun’s Berlin Philharmonic concert hall (completed in 1963).

By extending the form of this introverted structure to cover the entire competition site, little or no value is added to the immediate environs. To the contrary, that and the immense surfaces of the facades, right up to the edge of the pedestrian walkways, only serve to diminish the importance of the surrounding buildings. All the trees to the south of the site will disappear, and 90% of the outer walls of the building, regardless of the suggested use of porous brick detailing, are completely closed off.

(Courtesy Herzog & de Meuron / vVgt Landschaftsarchitekten AG)

Interior programming. (Courtesy Herzog & de Meuron / vVgt Landschaftsarchitekten AG)

Next in the firing line was the proposal’s program:

The corridors stacked over one another, labeled “Boulevards” by the architects, are connected in the quadrants by smaller corridors and stairs. The metaphor, “Boulevard,” is as misleading as was Le Corbusier’s “rue intérieur.” Boulevards are accessible 24 hours a day as open public spaces. In the evenings these corridors will be closed to the public. Rectangular exhibit areas are placed on three levels—not easily accessible to the visitor as a result of the labyrinth-like circulation plan.

Wang wasn’t too pleased with much of the competition’s submissions either. Few, he argued, failed to mediate space between the two already existing icons that inhabit the vicinity. New York studios SO-IL, Snøhetta, and REX were in the running for the $218.8 million project, along with British firms Zaha Hadid Architects and David Chipperfield Architects.

The most extreme anti-urbanistic example honored by the jury with a merit award was OMA’s pyramid-like scheme, completely blocking any relationship between Mies and Sharoun by inserting their own icon in between the two.

OMA's submission. (©OMA via Competitions)

OMA’s submission. (©OMA via Competitions)

By contrast, the shortlisted designs that entered the fray during the first open competition, Wang argues, were “more modern, sensitive, and led one to assume that a different solution would be in store.” These notions did filter into the competition’s final stage, said Wang, with SANAA and Sou Fujimoto’s (both from Japan) less disruptive proposed interventions.

Kazuyo Sejima + Ryue Nishizawa/SANAA's submission. (Courtesy SANAA via Competitions)

Kazuyo Sejima + Ryue Nishizawa/SANAA’s submission. (Courtesy SANAA via Competitions)

Note: For his Master’s degree in 1981, Wang researched six cultural centers including London’s South Bank Centre, Paris’s Centre Beaubourg and Berlin’s Kulturforum. In 1992 he published a monograph on the work of Herzog & de Meuron.

5 Finalists Selected for the 2017 EU Prize for Contemporary Architecture – Mies van der Rohe Award

eu_collage

Five European projects have been selected as finalists for the 2017 EU Prize for Contemporary Architecture – Mies van der Rohe Award. Chosen from a shortlist of 40 projects, the five finalists were lauded by the jury for their ability to “respond to the concerns of today’s European society.”

“Our instincts could be summed up by the words of Peter Smithson: ‘things need to be ordinary and heroic at the same time,’” said Jury Chairman Stephen Bates. “We were looking for an ordinariness whose understated lyricism is full of potential’.”

Through April, the jury members will visit each finalist project to evaluate the buildings firsthand and to see how they are used by the public. The Prize Winner will be announced in Brussels on May 16.

The five finalists are:

deFlat Kleiburg; Amsterdam, The Netherlands / NL Architects + XVW architectuur

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deFlat Kleiburg; Amsterdam, The Netherlands / NL Architects + XVW architectuur. Image © Stijn Spoelstra

deFlat Kleiburg; Amsterdam, The Netherlands / NL Architects + XVW architectuur. Image © Stijn Spoelstra
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deFlat Kleiburg; Amsterdam, The Netherlands / NL Architects + XVW architectuur. Image © Stijn Spoelstra

deFlat Kleiburg; Amsterdam, The Netherlands / NL Architects + XVW architectuur. Image © Stijn Spoelstra

Ely Court; London, UK / Alison Brooks Architects

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Ely Court; London, UK / Alison Brooks Architects. Image © Paul Riddle

Ely Court; London, UK / Alison Brooks Architects. Image © Paul Riddle
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Ely Court; London, UK / Alison Brooks Architects. Image © Paul Riddle

Ely Court; London, UK / Alison Brooks Architects. Image © Paul Riddle

Kannikegården; Ribe, Denmark / Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects

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Kannikegården; Ribe, Denmark / Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects. Image © Anders Sune Berg

Kannikegården; Ribe, Denmark / Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects. Image © Anders Sune Berg
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Kannikegården; Ribe, Denmark / Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects. Image © Anders Sune Berg

Kannikegården; Ribe, Denmark / Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects. Image © Anders Sune Berg

Katyn Museum; Warsaw, Poland / BBGK Architekci

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Katyn Museum; Warsaw, Poland / BBGK Architekci. Image © Juliusz Sokolowski

Katyn Museum; Warsaw, Poland / BBGK Architekci. Image © Juliusz Sokolowski
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Katyn Museum; Warsaw, Poland / BBGK Architekci. Image © Juliusz Sokolowski

Katyn Museum; Warsaw, Poland / BBGK Architekci. Image © Juliusz Sokolowski

Rivesaltes Memorial Museum; Rivesaltes, FranceRudy Ricciotti

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Rivesaltes Memorial Museum; Rivesaltes, France / Rudy Ricciotti. Image © Kevin Dolmaire

Rivesaltes Memorial Museum; Rivesaltes, France / Rudy Ricciotti. Image © Kevin Dolmaire
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Rivesaltes Memorial Museum; Rivesaltes, France / Rudy Ricciotti. Image © Kevin Dolmaire

Rivesaltes Memorial Museum; Rivesaltes, France / Rudy Ricciotti. Image © Kevin Dolmaire

“The Jury’s selection consolidates the European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture – Mies van der Rohe Award as a strategic element by which to promote research into, debate on and dissemination of contemporary architecture in Europe,” explained Anna Ramos, Director of the Fundació Mies van der Rohe.

“Issues such as collective housing, the complexity of the European city – both contemporary and historical – and the ability of architecture to create symbolic spaces provide us with the opportunity to extend the debate on the finalist works beyond architectural circuits, because they respond to the concerns of today’s European society.”

Malgorzata Omilanowska, art historian, former Minister of Culture in Poland and member of the Jury, added: “social housing, memory and the problem of context and new constructions in the old city centres have proven to be important to us as a Jury. The finalist works show the problematic of our time; what has happened in the last year reveals the really deep problem of populism and the lack of memory. These 5 projects show the problem that we face as citizens, not only as architecture specialists, but as members of today’s society.”

New for this year’s awards program, the 5 finalists and the Emerging Architect award buildings will be opened to the public between May 20th and 28th to meet the architects and Prize organizers and get a chance to learn more about the projects.

Established in 1987 by the European Union, the European Commission, the European Parliament and the Fundació Mies van der Rohe – Barcelona, the 60.000€ Mies Van der Rohe award is one of the most prestigious and important awards for European architecture.  The prize is awarded biennially to works that have been completed in the past two years. Previous winners have included the Barozzi / Veiga’s Philharmonic Hall Szczecin (2015); the Harpa Concert Hall and Conference Centre in Reykjavik (2013), designed by the Danish architectural firm Henning Larsen in collaboration with the Icelandic practice Batteríið and the artist Olafur Elíasson; and the Neues Museum in Berlin (2011), designed by David Chipperfield Architects and Julian Harrap.

Learn more about the Prize here.

News via Fundació Mies van der Rohe.

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