USGBC Announces Top 10 States for LEED in 2016

LEED Top 10 2016

This morning, the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) revealed its list of the Top 10 States for LEED in 2016.

Massachusetts leads the pack this year, with 136 LEED certified projects representing 3.73 square feet of certified space per resident. The state moved to the top of the list from third place last year.

LEED Top 10 2016

Washington, D.C., (which, due to its status as a federal district rather than a state, is not ranked) had 120 LEED certified projects completed in 2016, for 29.04 square feet of certified space per resident—a far higher ratio than any individual state.

LEED Top 10 2016

The USGBC calculates the rankings by assessing the total square feet of LEED-certified space per resident, taking into account commercial and institutional projects that were certified during 2016.

LEED Top 10 2016

“LEED guides our buildings, cities, communities and neighborhoods to become more resource and energy efficient, healthier for occupants and more competitive in the marketplace,” said Mahesh Ramanujam, president and CEO of USGBC. “The green building movement continues to evolve with advancements in technology, benchmarking and transparency, and the states on this list are leading the way toward a more sustainable future.”

Across the U.S., 3,366 projects were LEED certified in 2016.

Find the complete Top 10 list below, and an infographic from the USGBC here.


2016 Top 10 States for LEED
Rank State Certified Gross
Square Footage
(GSF)
Per-capita Certified
GSF
Total No.
Projects
1 MA* 24,398,765 3.73 136
2 CO* 15,921,457 3.17 92
3 IL* 36,188,485 2.82 151
4 NY 48,405,204 2.5 211
5 CA* 88,891,641 2.39 632
6 NV* 6,397,602 2.37 22
7 MD* 13,426,623 2.33 104
8 VA* 18,444,309 2.31 155
9 WA* 15,103,478 2.25 105
10 TX* 41,942,393 1.67 211
** DC 17,476,447 29.04 120

*Included in 2015 Top 10 States for LEED list

**Washington, D.C. is not ranked as it is a federal district, not a state

LEED Top 10 2016

 

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How Rebuilding Britain’s Houses of Parliament Helped Create Clean Air Laws

How Rebuilding Britain’s Houses of Parliament Helped Create Clean Air Laws, The British Houses of Parliament. Image © Flickr user megantrace. Licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0
The British Houses of Parliament. Image © Flickr user megantrace. Licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

MIT has published new research revealing how the reconstruction of the British Houses of Parliament paved the way for legislation to tackle air pollution in Victorian London. Through original archival work into the 1840-1870 reconstruction, MIT architectural historian Timothy Hyde has revealed that work on the Parliament building was so hindered by air pollution that the British government ordered an inquiry into the effects of the atmosphere on new buildings.

The British Houses of Parliament. Image © Flickr user megantrace. Licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0 © Flickr user daveograve. Licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0. Image New limestone corroded while the building was still being constructed. Image © Flickr user pahudson. Licensed under CC BY 2.0Westminster Bridge, 1903. Image © Flickr user nedgusnod2. Licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0+5

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 © Flickr user daveograve. Licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0. Image

© Flickr user daveograve. Licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0. Image

Britain’s medieval Parliament was destroyed by a fire in 1834. In its place, construction of the famous Gothic Revival building by Charles Barry began in 1840. However, the notorious soot, smoke, and grime chocking London’s air soon hampered the construction process, with new limestone corroding even as it was being built. Given the high-profile nature of the building in question, public attention was drawn to the effects of air pollution on new buildings. By 1875, Britain had passed a Public Health Act with articles specifically relating to smoke prevention.

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Westminster Bridge, 1903. Image © Flickr user nedgusnod2. Licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

Westminster Bridge, 1903. Image © Flickr user nedgusnod2. Licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

It really did enable a different understanding of the modern city…one building, like a factory, could cause the decay of another building. And the modern city had to be thought of as trying to achieve an equilibrium between its parts – Timothy Hyde, architectural historian at MIT.

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New limestone corroded while the building was still being constructed. Image © Flickr user pahudson. Licensed under CC BY 2.0

New limestone corroded while the building was still being constructed. Image © Flickr user pahudson. Licensed under CC BY 2.0

MIT’s historical research sits within a familiar modern context, with air pollution in London once again attracting public attention, and the Houses of Parliament once again in urgent need of restoration, attracting radical proposals.

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London still suffers from air pollution. Image © Flickr user stumayhew. Licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

London still suffers from air pollution. Image © Flickr user stumayhew. Licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Learn more about the link between the reconstruction of the Houses of Parliament and the introduction of clean-air laws by reading the full article here.

News via: MIT School of Architecture and Planning.

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