Woodland Elementary School / HMFH Architects

Woodland Elementary School / HMFH Architects, © Ed Wonsek
© Ed Wonsek
 

© Ed Wonsek © Ed Wonsek © Ed Wonsek © Ed Wonsek +25

  • Architects

  • Location

    Milford, MA, United States
  • Architects in Charge

    Laura Wernick, FAIA; Matt LaRue, AIA; Robert Williams, AIA
  • Area

    132500.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

  • Manufacturers

    Alpenglass, Conwed, JOHNSON, KOMPAN, TAKTL, Trespa

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© Ed Wonsek

© Ed Wonsek

HMFH Architects worked closely with educators to develop the concept for this new grade 3-5 elementary school. The educational program for the school is built around a team teaching methodology and inclusionary instruction that makes use of directed learning, small group activities, skill building, individualized instruction, and project-based learning as well as other techniques to ensure that the needs of each student are addressed. This is reflected in the design that features a series of shared spaces and small learning communities for the school’s 985 students.

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© Ed Wonsek

© Ed Wonsek
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© Ed Wonsek

© Ed Wonsek

Reinterpreting the predecessor Woodland School’s open plan concept, the new school is organized around grade-level learning. Each grade occupies one floor in the academic wing, grouped into three smaller clusters of six classrooms with a learning commons just outside the classrooms. These common areas, including a media space, amphitheater, circular storytelling rooms and an array of project areas, encourage a range of flexible teaching approaches. Educators can easily shift from classroom environments to large-group events, team projects, and small-group work sessions in the adjacent learning commons. Sinks and flexible furniture are included within the project areas to support “messy” hands-on activities.

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© Ed Wonsek

© Ed Wonsek

The school’s flexible academic wing was also designed for Woodland’s approach to differentiated instruction and RTI (Response to Intervention), in which students of differing abilities work in smaller groups in shared, small-group spaces next to pairs of classrooms. These small rooms are visible from the adjacent classrooms and allow students to stay near their “home base.”

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© Ed Wonsek

© Ed Wonsek
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Courtesy of HMFH Architects

Courtesy of HMFH Architects

Bookending the three-story academic wing are two wings housing core and community spaces: a dining/arts wing, which houses a cafeteria/performance space with stage, kitchen, music rooms, art rooms, a STEAM room, a viewing balcony, and administrative offices; and an athletic wing, containing a gym and a multipurpose wellness center.

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© Ed Wonsek

© Ed Wonsek

The new Woodland Elementary School has allowed the Town of Milford to address several critical facility issues, including realignment of town-wide grade configuration that reunites grades 6-8 in a single middle school, first-stage implementation of a new district-wide educational technology program, and accommodation of a growing elementary-aged population. The new school was constructed adjacent to the existing school, which allowed students to safely attend school without disruption while the new school was built.

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© Ed Wonsek

© Ed Wonsek

Product Description. The three-story academic wing is primarily clad with a concrete panel rain screen system. The concrete panels, in an 8-inch horizontal plank configuration, complement the brick masonry employed on the two-story ‘dining/arts’ and ‘athletic’ wings on either end in its range of texture and subdued color tones, as well as in its durability. The lightweight application and thinness of the product allow the panels to freely wrap the fold-out faces of classroom bay windows at the academic wing. Because of the directionality of the bay windows, the concrete panels are the most visible component of the façade until closer approach reveals bright colored panels in the fold of the bay windows, creating an element of surprise.

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© Ed Wonsek

© Ed Wonsek

The Bergeron Centre For Engineering Excellence / ZAS Architects

The Bergeron Centre For Engineering Excellence / ZAS Architects, © Doublespace Photography
© Doublespace Photography

© Doublespace Photography© Doublespace Photography© Doublespace Photography© Doublespace Photography+26

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© Doublespace Photography

© Doublespace Photography

From the architect. Setting benchmarks worldwide for engineering education, The Bergeron Centre for Engineering Excellence re-thinks campus hierarchy to foster modern ways of learning. Resulting from an intensive design process between ZAS Architects, The Lassonde School of Engineering, and York University, the world-class facility challenges past models with a modern approach rooted in student learning and empowerment.

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© Doublespace Photography

© Doublespace Photography

A hub for entrepreneurship, collaboration, and creativity, the facility’s design aims to advance engineering education and provide a platform to educate the next generation of engineers – The Renaissance Engineer: a creative problem solver and entrepreneurial leader with a social conscience.

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Ground Floor Plan

Ground Floor Plan

Student productivity drove the design process, optimizing spaces for learning, discovery and interaction. A complete immersion of technology and architecture allowed for no lecture halls, fewer classrooms and a project-based learning environment.

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© Doublespace Photography

© Doublespace Photography

Students, faculty, and staff areas are seamlessly integrated throughout the building. Inverting the typical structure, students are given access to the best and brightest spaces while offices are located in the core. Breaking down barriers, the layout creates opportunities for spontaneous faculty and student interaction within abundant social spaces.

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First Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

A beacon for invention in the outer ring of York University’s campus, The Bergeron Center’s bold architecture represents limitless creativity. Reflective of Renaissance principles of innovation and non- conformity, a cloud-like triangular glass façade stands bold. The undulating façade is comprised of a series of triangles positioned according to a precise and complex algorithm. Evoking the properties of a cloud, it reflects light and pattern across campus and into the interior.

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© Doublespace Photography

© Doublespace Photography

Inside the cloud, rows of desks and lecture halls are replaced with active learning classrooms. A massive multi-storey materials testing lab provides an unprecedented hands-on approach to both learning and teaching that was previously only available to engineers in the field. Bright open spaces replace traditional classrooms and labs. Integrated pods are configured with audiovisual learning tools that encourage students to spontaneously plug-in.

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Fourth Floor Plan

Fourth Floor Plan

Social spaces are thoughtfully integrated adjacent to intense research and academic areas, facilitating the cross-pollination of ideas and creativity among students and faculty. Echoing the look of a tech start-up, the open, energetic Design Commons is a gathering place for learning where students are encouraged to foster entrepreneurial ideas and prototype them.

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© Doublespace Photography

© Doublespace Photography

Playful, unexpected design elements are infused into the environment at every turn, creating endless inspiration. Throughout the building, a student-centric philosophy extends – even the corridors are places to learn and create with small niches, banquettes and white boards for around the clock brainstorming sessions and critique.

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© Doublespace Photography

© Doublespace Photography

The resulting imaginative space pushes boundaries for an equally imaginative approach to teaching, one that will empower and cultivate a new breed of globally aware and socially conscious engineers.

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