Outdoor tile / wall-mounted / floor-mounted / ceramic FOREST

Outdoor tile / wall-mounted / floor-mounted / ceramic FOREST revigres

Characteristics

  • Location:

    outdoor

  • Installation:

    wall-mounted, floor-mounted

  • Material:

    ceramic

  • Finish:

    matte, textured

  • Appearance:

    wood look

  • Color:

    beige, gray, white, brown, sand

  • Other characteristics:

    frost-resistant, non-slip, high-resistance

  • Length:

    75 cm (29.53 in)

  • Width:

    15 cm (5.91 in)

Description

FOREST combines the aesthetic effects of wood and the durability of ceramics.
It reproduces with precision the vein patterns and texture of natural wood, and combines it with wear resistance and easy cleaning and maintenance of ceramics, in a large variety of pieces.
Ceramic wall and floor tiles with natural or anti-slip finish for the perfect extension between indoor and outdoor areas.

3 Winners of the 2016 Young Talent Architecture Award Announced

3 Winners of the 2016 Young Talent Architecture Award Announced, Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

The Fundació Mies van der Rohe has announced the three winners of the inaugural Young Talent Architecture Award (YTAA) 2016. Established this year to “support the talent of recently graduated Architects, Urban Planners and Landscape Architects who will be responsible for transforming our environment in the future,”  9 finalists were selected from a shortlist of 30 projects, which was then narrowed down to 3 winners.

Winners

A symbiotic relation of cooperative social housing and dispersed tourism in Habana Vieja / Iwo Borkowicz, Faculty of Architecture, University of Leuven

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A symbiotic relation of cooperative social housing and dispersed tourism in Habana Vieja / Iwo Borkowicz, Faculty of Architecture, University of Leuven. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

The project proposes a simple and sustainable way to react to the dynamics of the demand of accommodation for tourists. The Jury appreciated the ‘glocal’ thinking which supports the local community in obtaining the tools to face the urban, economic and social changes that the city is undergoing.

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A symbiotic relation of cooperative social housing and dispersed tourism in Habana Vieja / Iwo Borkowicz, Faculty of Architecture, University of Leuven. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

S’lowtecture. Housing structure in Wroclaw-Zerniki / Tomasz Broma, Faculty of Architecture, Wroclaw University of Technology

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S'lowtecture. Housing structure in Wroclaw-Zerniki / Tomasz Broma, Faculty of Architecture, Wroclaw University of Technology. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

Housing is a key topic in Europe today and the project understands the impermanence of our habitat. The Jury considered the importance of understanding architecture as an open process in an ever-changing environment and the potential to create a real time experimental FabLab connected to an innovative housing experience.

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S'lowtecture. Housing structure in Wroclaw-Zerniki / Tomasz Broma, Faculty of Architecture, Wroclaw University of Technology. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

GeoFront. Strategic development plan for the frontier territories / Policarpo del Canto Baquera, Madrid School of Architecture, Polytechnic University of Madrid

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GeoFront. Strategic development plan for the frontier territories / Policarpo del Canto Baquera, Madrid School of Architecture, Polytechnic University of Madrid. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

The project addresses the topic of cohabitation and how borders (both political and geographical) can be transformed in order to make this cohabitation possible. This proposal approaches the role of design as a political tool, as a spatial practice within a new emergent socio-political space. The Jury was positively impressed by the amount of overlapping layers of complexity created and by the skillful designs and modeling to explain a newly imagined world.

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GeoFront. Strategic development plan for the frontier territories / Policarpo del Canto Baquera, Madrid School of Architecture, Polytechnic University of Madrid. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

Finalists

Death and Life of a Small French city, Alix Sportich du Réau de la Gaignonnière / Alice Villatte from School of architecture of Marne-la-Vallée, France

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Death and Life of a Small French city, Alix Sportich du Réau de la Gaignonnière / Alice Villatte from School of architecture of Marne-la-Vallée, France. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

Brewing Democracy: The Assembly of Le Balai Citoyen in Ouagadougou / Lorenzo Perri from AA, London, UK

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Brewing Democracy: The Assembly of Le Balai Citoyen in Ouagadougou / Lorenzo Perri from AA, London, UK. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

Genesis of a place towards the project / David Gonçalves Monteiro from FAUP, Porto, PT

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Genesis of a place towards the project / David Gonçalves Monteiro from FAUP, Porto, PT. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

Living in a cultural environment / Clàudia Carreras Oliver from ETSALS, Barcelona, ES

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Living in a cultural environment / Clàudia Carreras Oliver from ETSALS, Barcelona, ES. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

Living in offices. The alive triangle of Bordelongue in Toulouse / Jaufret Barrot, Cinthia Isabel Carrasco Fuentes from ENSA, Toulouse, FR

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Living in offices. The alive triangle of Bordelongue in Toulouse / Jaufret Barrot, Cinthia Isabel Carrasco Fuentes from ENSA, Toulouse, FR. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

Subversions Minhocao / Laura Abbruzzese from DA, Ferrara, IT

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Subversions Minhocao / Laura Abbruzzese from DA, Ferrara, IT. Image Courtesy of Fundació Mies van der Rohe

The YTAA 2016 Jury consisted of:

  • Jose Luis Vallejo, Architect, Principal at Ecosistema Urbano, Madrid (President)
  • Inge Beckel, Architect, Editor at Swiss-Architects.com, Zurich
  • Michał Duda, Architecture Historian, Curator at the Museum of Architecture, Wroclaw
  • Juulia Kauste, Sociologist, Director at the Museum of Finnish Architecture, Helsinki
  • Triin Ojari, Architect, Director at the Museum of Estonian Architecture, Tallinn

For more information on the award, check out the website, here.

News via Fundació Mies van der Rohe.

Does Teaching Architecture Enhance Architectural Practice?

Yale student desks, or a studio in the midst of a deadline? It's the former, but according to Sarah Lorenzen the boundary between academia and practice is more permeable than you might think. Image: Wikipedia

Yale student desks, or a studio in the midst of a deadline? It’s the former, but according to Sarah Lorenzen the boundary between academia and practice is more permeable than you might think. Image: Wikipedia

As if running a practice wasn’t challenging enough, numerous architects and designers also engage regularly in teaching, whether it’s giving one-off lectures around the world or teaching full studios and courses at universities. So how does teaching influence the practice of architecture, and vice versa?

Jimenez Lai, director of Bureau Spectacular and lecturer at UCLA, once noted in an interview that he tries to teach his students to “have fun, work hard, and don’t be an asshole.” But it’s not just students who benefit from pragmatically-imbued teaching: as Steven Holl noted, “I feel invigorated by the interaction and dialogue with the students. In a spirit of giving back to the field, the teaching exchange has also kept me on architects that both teach and practice serve as a crucial connective tissuekeen focus with the potentials of architecture as it has changed in the last decades.” While the exchange between practicing architects and their students is often as customized as the aesthetic sensibility of each designer, there are commonalities to the relationship that span across practices and institutions. From Greg Lynn toToyo Ito to Deborah Berke, architects that both teach and practice serve as a crucial connective tissue between the highly abstract realm of academia and the gritty, oftentimes grinding reality of permits, stakeholder meetings and aesthetic compromises.

To more fully understand how this relationship functions, I spoke to Sarah Lorenzen, chair of California State Polytechnic University, Pomona’s Department of Architecture, and Peter Tolkin, founder of Peter Tolkin Architecture, both of whom are engaged in a collaboration that balances the worlds of academia and real practice.

“Interim” student exhibition at Cal Poly Pomona. Image: Cal Poly Pomona

“Interim” student exhibition at Cal Poly Pomona. Image: Cal Poly Pomona

How does teaching influence your work? I’ve read interviews where you discussed how you get exposed to material you haven’t thought about in decades, due to students unearthing it. Is that something that you come to rely on in your own work?

Sarah Lorenzen: Obviously, there’s a lot of advantages to the influence of teaching on practice. You’re staying current, not only with what students are unearthing, but staying current with what other people who are in the boundary between academia and practice are looking at. That’s always really interesting. As you know, especially in Southern California, where all of the schools are so intertwined so everybody is collaborating or talking with people from UCLA or USC or SCI-Arc, and everybody’s in a much greater conversation than is probably possible if you’re only in a practice. In a practice, you’re in conversation, but it’s with your peers and your employees and the other people in the practice, but not necessarily people that might have very different approaches to the practice.

Peter, do you engage in any teaching, or are you primarily focused on work? 

Peter Tolkin: I’ve taught at Cal Poly quite a few times, and I’ve taught at the University of San Diego, so I have taught, and I came from a very academic background from the standpoint of having done an MFA at Cal Arts, and having gone on to do a Master’s in Architecture. Cal Arts is a very it’s important to have some engagement with the academic world.theoretically-based arts program and when I graduated from architecture school, I really wanted to build and I wanted to learn about building, but I also felt that it’s important to have some engagement with the academic world. My percentage in academia is probably like 80 percent practice and 20 percent academia, and Sarah’s is the inverse of that. So, I have taught. I would like to teach again. The one thing for me is that I’ve taught a couple of times topic studios which I think are super interesting in terms of exploring something in-depth with a group of students that you’re maybe thinking about, and doing it in a way that’s very fresh with younger people. You really can’t do it in an office, for the most part.

Studio crit. Image: Architectural Association School of Architecture.

SL: It’s funny that you called, because really for the last four years, inhabiting the role of Chair in a school, it’s been very hard to practice. Now that my chairmanship is winding down, Peter and I are teaming up. We’ve been collaborating since the summer and we’re moving ahead in terms of figuring that out. I will still be about 60 percent at school and 40 percent here, and he’ll be mostly here and probably teaching occasionally. We’ve been talking a lot about what it means to have a practice that has a foot in academia. And we both admire firms that have managed to do that.

PT: I think one of the dangers of being in practice is that you can easily get all the demands of actually practicing architecture (which is everything from paying your employees to paying the bills to dealing with clients and dealing with a lot of pressures), which can really take you away from the kind of conceptually-based work that is really at the center of what I’m interested in, and I think what both of us are interested in. One of the things that having a foot in the academic world does is that it always keeps that conceptual side of architecture alive, which I think is critical.

One of the reasons we’re coming together is that we both have something to offer each other in terms of what we do. If I only practiced, especially going through the downturn, when it was hard to grow your business or keep your business-side going, it could easily take you away from what’s at the core of why you do what you do.

I wanted to ask you what it’s like in terms of switching between what must be two disparate modes: in academia, you’re able to explore these concepts without restraint, which is wonderful. But when you’re back in the office, you have to deal with, as you mentioned, all of these other sort of pragmatic and less fun concerns. The speed changes too, right? I would assume there’s a more exploratory, leisurely pace when you’re teaching versus the faster, more intense and demanding reality of a work situation. Or do you find that the transition is not that big of a change?

SL: I personally think they’re not as different as people think they are. It probably depends on the kind of practice, but certainly in an office this size, which is 10 or 12 people, where there’re a lot of young people who are very engaged, the conversations are still largely about what the conceptual ideas are for the work. And then the everyday pragmatics are of getting the drawings done and the things built. Until you go into construction, there are a lot of similarities in the way that you talk and collaborate with people, and how to move forward and address the issues so that it reinforces the larger conceptual idea of the project. Really, when you’re working with students, they’re largely doing the same thing. They do have fewer constraints. The mode of working is similar, it’s just that the constraints in a working environment are greater. Peter might have a different way of thinking about it.

PT: We’re looking at a lot of projects that are conceptually-based projects or had strong ideas behind them. When we did the initial drawings and the initial design, whether it’s The conversations happen through the work of the students.models or drawing or some kind of combination, there’s a point at which we had to shift into making it real, producing it—that, in a sense, eclipses the end-game of where those representations might go if you’re able to develop them. We’re working with younger people right out of school on this. We take and explore the projects in another level of depth in terms of the representation. It’s allowing us to explore this stuff in a way we might not be able to do if we had a client saying, “Well, when are you going to get this to the building department?” When you have a certain kind of schedule, the mode of how you’re dealing with the work changes at some point into how you make it. I personally think both should happen; we’re both committed to wanting to see ideas become physical at some point. But at the same time, there’s a furthering of it in the non-professional sense of building buildings, that often happens in academia. The hope is that it happens here too.

Image: Bradley Walters via studiowalters.com

Image: Bradley Walters via studiowalters.com

You had brought up this idea of the larger conversation that you can have because of the connectivity between all these schools in Los Angeles. Can you discuss how technology plays into that, or any other attributes that spring out of that connectivity, such as software or modeling strategies?

SL: The review model is fairly unique to the U.S.—obviously all schools around the world have reviews, but in the U.S. (and particularly in cities where there are a large number of schools), the review process is much more robust than it is in a lot of places I’ve seen. It’s very different in Europe. The conversations happen through the work of the students. If you have ten people sitting on a panel and everybody’s from a different school, the conversations happen through the work of the student, and that might include issues such as representation for the work, which in some ways is related to technology. There are other issues; the techniques that derive the work, for example. Some schools are technique-driven. And that might include software. And then there’s very much the conceptual conversation about meaning.

That I think is probably common to all schools and probably the subject matter that’s currently the most discussed. I’ve noticed in the last few years that the conversations have moved away from technique and towards the conceptual and the representational. The conversations happen through the work and through the fact that everybody is friends with one another, which sounds like I think that academia drives practice, not the other way arounda funny way of describing it, but everybody’s going to similar events or going to each other’s houses for dinner. It’s interesting that there’s this shift toward the conceptual and representational because I think that there’s a delay about what’s being discussed inacademia versus what’s being discussed in a practice. If you want to be in the discussion as it pertains to what’s being discussed in academia, it’s nice that the work, especially if you’re both teaching and practicing, that that conversation is much closer to the work. That’s because it informs the work, if you’re doing it. I think that academia drives practice, not the other way around, although maybe that’s my bias.

Architects As Developers: The Pros & Cons

Architects As Developers: The Pros & Cons, Jonathan Segal’s newest mixed-use project called “Mr Robinson” located in San Diego. Image © Jonathan Segal Architect
Jonathan Segal’s newest mixed-use project called “Mr Robinson” located in San Diego. Image © Jonathan Segal Architect

This article was originally published by Archipreneur as “Reasons Why Architects Can Make Great Developers (or not?).”

Today, a majority of architects work solely on the design end of the development process. It is common knowledge that the net value of architectural services in a projects’ total value amounts to a very small percentage (it’s usually in single digits), which puts architects near the bottom of the financial structure in the AEC industry.

Stuck between developers, clients, contractors, and subcontractors, architects are usually in a role that implies great responsibility but proportionally low compensation for it. When we add to that the grievance of not having full control of a project, it becomes clear as to why an increasing number of architects either transition to real estate development or transform their design offices into design-builds.

Though still in its infancy, this transition seems indicative of an emancipatory trend that’s taking place, where architects take matters into their own hands and thus claim their rightful position within the industry.

However, with this newfound ambition comes a new set of challenges. Developing a project from drawing board to building site requires business skills that are not taught in architecture schools. Can architects bridge this gap and compete with seasoned developers? Are there advantages to being a designer when it comes to the nitty-gritty of actually building a project?

Let’s take a look the major pros and cons of architects working as developers.

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Pros

#1 – Architects Understand the Process of Building

As architects come to learn about the different aspects of project development in the course of their education and throughout their career in the industry, most know what it takes to design and construct a building. They often have project management experience and understand the process of site and project analysis, construction techniques, acquiring building permits and controlling budgets.

This is particularly the case in smaller offices where project managers are often required to perform various roles, from leading the project team and administering construction contracts, through negotiating with clients and contractors, to scheduling and monitoring processes. Due to this versatility in their experience, architects can make sure that construction is completed on schedule and under budget.

In addition to these general skills and competencies, architects often become experts in various niches. Over the course of their careers, many practicing architects specialize in specific typologies, which can be a huge advantage when going into development in these specific areas.

#2 – Great Design Increases Market Value

The expertise that architects bring to the table can have a significant impact on the financial bottom line of a project. For example, sustainable design features can significantly increase the value of a property. Or, as Tyler Stonebreaker puts it in his interview on Archipreneur Insights: “At the end of the day, the market is placing the highest premium on things that are unique and special.”

People are becoming increasingly interested in energy efficient or high performance properties, which is why green design certification programs like LEED and NGBS can raise the selling price of a house. In addition to sustainability, experienced architects also know how to use designs to create quality spaces on limited budgets.

They can also reconcile profitmaking with a broader strategy for social change and an increased quality of life over a longer period of time. Architects that are working as property developers are more likely to consider innovative and creative solutions; solutions that ordinary developers might either overlook or reject.

#3 – Architects Know How Cities Work

Architects are trained to think in terms of place making instead of creating objects that are detached from their surroundings. An architect-developer is trained to consider how a project might sit within and relate to its context, ensuring long-term benefits for themselves, their clients and the relevant neighborhoods. Architects are taught to understand urbanism and recognize areas with development potential. They may, for example, see real opportunity in a vacant lot that doesn’t seem to off

CITIC Pacific High-Rise Development in Shanghai Beautifully Combines Natural With The Artificial

CITIC Pacific High-Rise Development in Shanghai Beautifully Combines Natural With The Artificial , Courtesy of EID
Courtesy of EID

EID Architecture looks to the traditional side of Shanghai when designing CITIC Pacific‘s high-rise residential neighborhood. The Shanghai downtown area will see six new residential towers and amenities through the development.

Designs for the building encourage social interactions through its amenities, which include leisure facilities, a spa, meeting and conference spaces, and roof gardens overhead. Undulating terraces on the top of each building promote a sense of community in addition to responding to the site’s preservation of sunlight.

Courtesy of EIDCourtesy of EIDCourtesy of EIDCourtesy of EID+32

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Courtesy of EID

Courtesy of EID
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Courtesy of EID

Courtesy of EID

In vast contrast to neo-classical residential towers often seen in China, CITIC Pacific Residence aims to create a residential design sensible to the site and its context. It is unique and memorable, reflecting the ethos of evolving city of Shanghai, said EID design principal Ping Jiang, AIA.

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Courtesy of EID

Courtesy of EID
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Courtesy of EID

Courtesy of EID
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Courtesy of EID

Courtesy of EID

In a beautiful combination of natural and artificial, the landscape design incorporates the “duality of Chinese architecture tradition.” The fluidity of the garden space mixes with the geometric structure of the residential buildings, resulting in a contemporary yet culturally inspired project.

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Courtesy of EID

Courtesy of EID
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Courtesy of EID

Courtesy of EID

Pacific Residence Phase II also comprises small retail buildings and a kindergarten along the main street. Renovated Shikumen – common land houses in Shanghai — served for the new retail buildings, while the design of the kindergarten borrowed from that vernacular.

EID is an architecture, urban planning, and interior design firm noted for its commitment to sustainability.

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Courtesy of EID

Courtesy of EID

News Via: EID Architecture

Apple Regent Street / Foster + Partners

Apple Regent Street  / Foster + Partners, © Nigel Young
© Nigel Young

© Nigel Young © Nigel Young © Nigel Young © Nigel Young +13

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© Nigel Young

© Nigel Young

From the architect. The re-imagining of Apple Regent Street in London marks the continuing evolution of Apple, going beyond retail to create richer, more dynamic experiences for visitors. Its innovative design creates a relaxed environment, while incorporating Apple’s new features and services. The design is the result of a close collaboration between Apple’s teams led by Jonathan Ive, chief design officer and Angela Ahrendts, senior vice president of Retail and Foster + Partners.

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© Nigel Young

© Nigel Young

Regent Street is one of the most famous shopping streets in the world, and the site where Apple opened its first retail store in Europe in 2004. The new store occupies the same building, with the Grade II listed historic façade now restored and preserved. Built in 1898, the building was the studio of Victorian mosaicist Antonio Salviati of Venice, who was responsible for the exquisite mosaics at the Albert Memorial Chapel in Windsor and St Paul’s Cathedral in London.

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Ground Floor

Ground Floor

Stefan Behling, Architect at Foster + Partners said, “The new Apple Regent Street is about a respectful dialogue between old and new – carrying forward a heritage of craftsmanship in a contemporary way. Contained within its historic fabric, is a new grand ‘town square’ with trees that bring nature into the interior spaces. Everything from the vast luminous ceiling to the sculptural stone handrails create an experience that is warm and inviting, providing a calm backdrop for everyone to experience Apple’s incredible products, in addition to a diverse and vibrant programme of events. It is a place for people to meet and collaborate, and most of all, it will be an exciting experience that goes beyond retail.”

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© Nigel Young

© Nigel Young

Characteristic of the new Apple Flagships, the interior space is a 7.2-metre double-height grand hall – forming a ‘town square’ like space that is flexible and welcoming. The design enhances transparency from the street and floods the store with natural light, dramatically improving the visual connection between the two levels. The interior front facade, with its full height arches clad in Portland stone, can be appreciated in its full extent. The store also features the longest Luminous Ceiling Panels in the world that cover the entire ceiling. The custom-made lighting panels emit a pure, even, white light, and have the capability to absorb ambient noise.

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Section

Section

Using a warm palette of materials including stone, wood and terrazzo that is sympathetic to the historic nature of the building, the store has a calm setting, with the increased height allowing for the addition of twelve Ficus Ali trees on the ground level, bringing nature to the interior spaces. The grove of trees have planters – designed by Apple’s ID Studio and Foster + Partners – that double as a comfortable place to sit and rest. The signature Apple display tables are set against the backdrop of the new Avenue – the completely redesigned wall display that allows people to touch, feel and try out the Apple products and accessories in an engaging and hands-on way. Located in the middle of the space, The Forum is a new learning environment, where experts from various fields can come to entertain, inspire and teach. It occupies a prime position in the store with a vast video wall that acts as an animated backdrop for the entire store.

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© Nigel Young

© Nigel Young

Along the side walls, a staircase on either side of the screen draws one up to the new mezzanine level set amongst the treetops. The walls and staircases are made from sandblasted stone, while the balustrade – seemingly carved in to the wall – has a smooth, curved, and honed finish that is pleasant to touch. The stone walls and balustrade were created by a combination of handcraftsmanship and CNC robotics, and were dry assembled at the manufacturing site to make sure each piece fit perfectly before installation.

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© Nigel Young

© Nigel Young

Overlooking the grand hall, the mezzanine hosts the Apple’s Geniuses, where visitors can get assistance to setup their device or answers any product related queries, and the Boardroom – a place for meetings, conversations and partnerships that can be used by app developers, digital entrepreneurs and other small start-ups to become part of the Apple family.

AIA Announces Recipients of Innovation Award

AIA Announces Recipients of Innovation Award, ©Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture, © Keitaro Yoshioka, © Mortenson Construction, © Dana Wheelock
©Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture, © Keitaro Yoshioka, © Mortenson Construction, © Dana Wheelock

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has selected this year’s winners for the TAP/CCA Innovation Award, which highlights new practices and technologies that advance project delivery and life-cycle management of buildings. Categories for the awards, conferred by the AIA’s Technology in Architectural Practice (TAP) Knowledge Community and the Construction Contract Administration (CCA) Knowledge Community), include Stellar Design, Project Delivery & Construction Administration Excellence, Academic Program/Curriculum Development, and Exemplary Use in a Small Firm. Voting is open from now until November 18th for favorite projects among the winners.

Astana Expo City 2017 (Astana, Kazakhstan) / Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture. Image © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill ArchitectureGlazing & Winter Comfort Tool (Boston, MA) / Payette. Image © Keitaro YoshiokaEpic Deep Space Auditorium (Verona, WI) / Cuningham Group Architecture, Inc.. Image © Dana WheelockAstana Expo City 2017 (Astana, Kazakhstan) / Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture. Image © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture+22

Category A: Stellar Design

Award Citation: Astana Expo City 2017 (Astana, Kazakhstan) / Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

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Astana Expo City 2017 (Astana, Kazakhstan) / Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture. Image © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

Astana Expo City 2017 (Astana, Kazakhstan) / Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture. Image © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

Currently under construction, Astana Expo City 2017 will embrace the exposition’s theme, “Future Energy,” with the aim of reducing the overall energy demand of the site by using both passive and active strategies. All opportunities for power generation were investigated and several were incorporated into the building-design guidelines, including high-performance glazing; energy piles that will reduce energy demand and provide temperature modulation during winter; energy storage capacity that can meet two days of emergency demand; 100% of rainfall from a 100-year storm event managed on site; and 90% of waste generated on site will be diverted from a landfill.

Honorable Mention: Epic Deep Space Auditorium (Verona, WI) / Cuningham Group Architecture, Inc.

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Epic Deep Space Auditorium (Verona, WI) / Cuningham Group Architecture, Inc.. Image © Dana Wheelock

Epic Deep Space Auditorium (Verona, WI) / Cuningham Group Architecture, Inc.. Image © Dana Wheelock

Situated on an 811-acre site, Deep Space is Epic Systems Corporation’s largest auditorium, seating up to 11,400 guests and was completed in less than 24 months. To create the rolling roof forms and building façade, a combination of hand sculpted and laser-cut models were developed concurrently in programs suited for generation of complex shapes. The final physical model was a large scale clay model that was 3D-scanned in order to produce a digital point cloud which was integrated with BIM software and became the engine that drove the other technical delivery tools of the project. The auditoriums 8-acre green roof provides visual and physical connections to the surrounding Wisconsin landscape.  

Category B: Project Delivery & Construction Administration Excellence

Award Citation: Froedtert & the Medical College of Wisconsin Center for Advanced Care (Wauwatosa, WI) / Mortenson Construction & Cannon Design

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Froedtert & the Medical College of Wisconsin Center for Advanced Care (Wauwatosa, WI) / Mortenson Construction & CannonDesign. Image © Mortenson Construction

Froedtert & the Medical College of Wisconsin Center for Advanced Care (Wauwatosa, WI) / Mortenson Construction & CannonDesign. Image © Mortenson Construction

Utilizing the latest Virtual Design and Construction (VDC) building tools and technology, the design team developed and pioneered new ways to add value and communicate with each other. By implementing a one-model approach, the team was able coordinate in advance of construction, which reduced duplication of modeling efforts, and greatly accelerated the development of fabrication models.  Compared to a previous project with the same construction management/architect team, the one-model approach resulted in a 50% reduction in Request for Information (RFI) and an 18% reduction in Architect Supplemental Instruction (ASI), as well as the addition of five floors per the owner’s request with no change to the original completion date of the project.

Category D: Practice-Based or Academic Research, Curriculum, or Applied Technology Development

Honorable Mention: Glazing & Winter Comfort Tool (Boston, MA) / Payette

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Glazing & Winter Comfort Tool (Boston, MA) / Payette. Image © Keitaro Yoshioka

Glazing & Winter Comfort Tool (Boston, MA) / Payette. Image © Keitaro Yoshioka

The Glazing and Winter Comfort Tool is based on existing scientific research that aims to improve the design community’s understand of the triggers of thermal discomfort in the wintertime. It was developed to be simple and intuitive so that architects and engineers can design glazed facades that provide the desired levels of transparency, comfort and energy performance at an ideal cost. The development of the tool involved contributions from building scientists, designers and web developers. Previously, the only way to understand which façade properties negatively or positively impact occupant comfort involved a costly and time-intensive Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation. The Glazing and Winter Thermal Comfort Tool was conceived to facilitate this decision-making process quickly and inexpensively early in the design.

Category E: Exemplary Use in a Small Firm

Award Citation: Youth & Opportunity United (Evanston, IL) / Studio Talo Architecture

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Youth & Opportunity United (Evanston, IL) / Studio Talo Architecture. Image © Douglas Snider, Studio Talo Architecture

Youth & Opportunity United (Evanston, IL) / Studio Talo Architecture. Image © Douglas Snider, Studio Talo Architecture

Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.), a 45-year-old non-profit, youth development agency requested renderings of their new headquarters for a community outreach and fund-raising campaign. The architects understood that the youth, not the building, needed to be the campaign’s focus, so they created multiple 360-degree virtual reality video renderings of spaces in the building, populated with video avatars of young people served by the organization acting as tour guides, explaining how Y.O.U. and the new building would impact their lives. Through the dynamic video rendering, community members and donors experienced Y.O.U’s mission, rather than just their plans.

News and project descriptions via: American Institute of Architects

Kitchen tile / for floors / wall-mounted / porcelain stoneware FIRENZE HERITAGE : MAIOLICA

Kitchen tile / for floors / wall-mounted / porcelain stoneware FIRENZE HERITAGE : MAIOLICA FAP ceramiche

Characteristics

  • Location:

    kitchen

  • Installation:

    wall-mounted, for floors

  • Material:

    porcelain stoneware

  • Finish:

    high-gloss

  • Motif:

    patterned

  • Length:

    20 cm (7.87 in)

  • Width:

    20 cm (7.87 in)

Description

Once again, Fap ceramiche has embarked on an incredible new project: Firenze Heritage, a collection of naturally shaded porcelain stoneware floor and wall coverings that bring a contemporary twist to the appearance of traditional cotto tiles.

Destined to appeal to anyone seeking to create a modern, sophisticated ambience, an inviting, relaxing atmosphere or a traditional, classic look, Firenze Heritage is able to respond to the needs of a broad spectrum of users – from private customers to architects and design engineers – and to deliver a perfect finish to both residential and contract settings.

In the photo, kitchen wall tiled with 20×20 cm Firenze Heritage Maiolica Deco Blu, Brillante finish, from the Firenze Heritage porcelain stoneware floor and wall tile collection by Fap ceramiche, which offers a contemporary take on the finest Italian ceramic tradition.

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