Ceiling-mounted shower head TENDER RAIN SHOWER HEADS

Ceiling-mounted shower head TENDER RAIN SHOWER HEADS TENDER RAIN

Characteristics

  • Installation:

    ceiling-mounted

Description

OUR SHOWER HEADS ARE AVAILABLE IN A HUGE NUMBER OF DIFFERENT FINISHES. In this photo: Calices – white mat – REGISTERED PATTERN – PATENTED CONSTRUCTION SYSTEM –

AIA Announces Winners of the 2016 Small Project Awards

AIA Announces Winners of the 2016 Small Project Awards

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has selected seven recipients of the 2016 Small Project Awards. This is the 13th edition of the program, which was established to recognize firms for their excellence in small-project design. This year the winners have been placed into two categories: Category 1, which awards “a small project construction, object, work of environmental art or architectural design element up to $150,000 in construction cost,” and Category 2, given to “A small project construction, up to $1,500,000 in construction cost.”

This year’s winners include a wide variety of program types and sites. Continue after the break for the list and descriptions of the projects.

Category 1

Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh Studio Hive; Pittsburgh  / GBBN Architects

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© Ed Massery

© Ed Massery

The Studio Hive is part of the Teen Zone in the East Liberty Branch of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. Made of wood and sound absorbent industrial felt its creation has contributed to a 350% increase in attendance at the library’s teen programs and events. The design team developed a 3-dimensional digital model of the hive which allowed designers to tune the form and refine it to minimize material waste. The connection to both the remaining library space and to the street provides teens with a sense of their social context and environment while they occupy a space that is uniquely personal.

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© Ed Massery

© Ed Massery

Deployable Smocked Porch; Winterset, Iowa / Substance Architecture

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© Paul Crosby

© Paul Crosby

A simple wooden frame defines the small space and supports two porch swings. The smocked screening creates curtains that can be opened and closed to allow access, as well as provide shade and enclosure. A rectangular opening in the roof allows a defined shaft of daylight to enter the space. This opening is echoed in the small turf area cut into the floor. The project was designed and constructed adjacent to the courthouse square in Winterset as a pro bono effort to support The Iowa Preservation Alliance. The wood was salvaged from a demolished home, and the labor to sew, fabricate, and construct the space were provided by the design team. As a result, the budget for the project was $900.

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© Paul Crosby

© Paul Crosby

wa_sauna; Seattle / goCstudio

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© Kevin Scott

© Kevin Scott

This floating sauna, funded through the support of a crowdfunding campaign, functions as a boat that can be moored at a marina or private property and taken out on the open water as needed. The interior space is heated by a simple efficient wood burning stove. As a mobile piece of architecture, wa_sauna is able to engage with the many inhabitants living aboard boats and houseboats as well as the large community of boaters, kayakers, paddle boarders and rowers. Using a pre-manufactured aluminium frame and floatation system for the deck, wa_sauna can be seen quietly exploring Seattle’s lakes on a regular basis.

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© Kevin Scott

© Kevin Scott

Weihnacht Huts; Bethlehem, Pennsylvania / NAD

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© Nik Nikolov

© Nik Nikolov

This pro-bono design is for thirty-five craft exhibit huts for an authentic German Weihnachtsmarkt (open-air Christmas market). The huts feature a steeply-sloped roof designed for snowfall and a ridge line borrowed from traditional Moravian vernacular. With a limited budget for materials ($286 per unit), paired with the necessity for the structures to be taken apart and stored every year, the deck, walls, and roof panels are constructed as single units to be taken apart, transported, and stored flat with ease. The poly-carbonate roof is not only easy to dissemble, but also allows for a large amount of light and warmth inside during the day. During the night the huts are illuminated from within and emit a lovely glow to add to the magical Christmas atmosphere of Bethlehem’s historic district. 

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© Nik Nikolov

© Nik Nikolov

Category 2

Girl Scouts Camp Prairie Schooner; Kansas City, Missouri / el dorado

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© Mike Sinclair

© Mike Sinclair

Camp Prairie Schooner features a dining hall, five permanent units, two buildings for troop use, a 40-foot rappel tower, an archery range, a swimming pool and a zipline. The load bearing walls of the structures are constructed of 2×6 wood studs, that in turn support a series of common & scissor trusses. The envelope is clad with corrugated metal panels, complementing the wood and aluminum clad windows and skylights. The end of the bunk houses are a combination of fluted polycarbonate glazing and painted concrete board over a rain screen system. All mechanical systems are concealed within the trusses. The pendant lights are custom fixtures designed and built by a former girl scout.

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© Mike Sinclair

© Mike Sinclair

Linear Cabin; Alma Lake, Wisconsin / Johnsen Schmaling Architects

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© Johnsen Schmaling Architects

© Johnsen Schmaling Architects

The Linear Cabin is a small family retreat, its low-slung body sitting in a small clearing in Wisconsin’s North Woods. The building consists of three identically sized, nearly opaque boxes tied together with a continuous thin roof plane. The voids between the boxes serve as picture frames, allowing for unobstructed views through the building from the outside and into the sylvan landscape from within. The interior is clad in knotty pine, and is tempered by its crisply detailed joints and the simple lines of the lacquered millwork throughout.  On the outside, the cabin is wrapped in blackened cedar, its somber darkness echoing the weathered monochrome of traditional Wisconsin cabins. 

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© Johnsen Schmaling Architects

© Johnsen Schmaling Architects

St. Pius Chapel & Prayer Garden; New Orleans / Eskew+Dumez+Ripple

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© Will Crocker

© Will Crocker

Designed as a quiet refuge and intimate sanctuary for sacred reflection and contemplation, the new chapel is a subtle addition to the landscape. The sanctuary, which complements the modernist character of the adjacent church (circa 1963), is small but tall, keeping occupants close while inspiring reverence. Beyond a few pieces of furniture and religious items, the space’s power and purpose is enhanced by its very simplicity allowing occupants worship in quiet and contemplative solitude, without distraction.

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© Will Crocker

© Will Crocker

Studio Dental; San Francisco / Montalba Architects, Inc.

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© Mitch Tobias

© Mitch Tobias

The challenge was to create a spacious interior while packing Studio Dental’s required program for its mobile unit, which travels to businesses offering convenient dentistry.  The 26-foot-long trailer with 230 interior square feet features a waiting area, sterilization room, and two operatories.  The sterilization room is hidden behind millwork panels that wrap around to form the patient waiting bench.  A centralized, double-sided millwork panel houses equipment for both operatories and gestures up to 11-foot-plus ceilings with translucent sculpted skylights.  The materials reinforce Studio Dental’s identity with natural wood millwork, bright-white surfaces, and a custom perforation pattern.

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© Mitch Tobias

© Mitch Tobias

Village Health Works Staff Housing; Bujumbura Burundi / Louise Braverman Architect

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© Iwan Baan

© Iwan Baan

Embedded in the mountainside of an off-the-grid rural village in Burundi, this 18-bed staff housing is a bridge between East African elemental aesthetics and inventive sustainability. Cutting a skewed line in the terrain, the 6000-square-foot dormitory captures breathtaking mountain views. The same moves that establish its visual presence, such as airflow enhancing porches, also advance its sustainability. Currently rebuilding after many years of horrific civil strife, the villagers hope that this housing will create a model for the sustainable future of both the community and the country.

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© Iwan Baan

© Iwan Baan

Nigerian Institute of Architects Lagos State Chapter(NIA) LSC Biennial General Meeting and Elections

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Francis Kéré Creates Installation from Brightly Colored Thread for First U.S. Retrospective

Francis Kéré Creates Installation from Brightly Colored Thread for First U.S. Retrospective, © Tim Tiebout. Courtesy of PMA
© Tim Tiebout. Courtesy of PMA

Currently on display at the Philadelphia Museum of Modern Art, Award-winning African architect Diébédo Francis Kéré has created Colorscape, a installation made from steel and brightly-colored fiber, to accompany his first solo show in the United States. The exhibition is titled The Architecture of Francis Kéré: Building with Community, and features of a retrospective of the architect’s career that includes material artifacts, tools and scale-models created for stand-out projects in both Africa and Europe.

© Tim Tiebout. Courtesy of PMA© Tim Tiebout. Courtesy of PMA© Tim Tiebout. Courtesy of PMA© Tim Tiebout. Courtesy of PMA+23

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© Tim Tiebout. Courtesy of PMA

© Tim Tiebout. Courtesy of PMA

Francis Kéré was raised in the rural village of Gando, Burkina Faso, where architecture is designed through a transparent process involving the entire community. Kéré had carried those community-driven traditions into his work throughout the world, employing local knowledge and materials to give his buildings a sense of place.

The exhibition dives deeper into this construction process, displaying a curated selection of photos and models from his firm’s projects including the Camper pop-up shop, the Gando school library and theSensing Spaces Pavilion, along with three interactive films featuring clips from Kéré’s childhood and the construction of his most recent project, the Schorge Secondary School.

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© Tim Tiebout. Courtesy of PMA

© Tim Tiebout. Courtesy of PMA

The dynamic Colorscape serves as the centerpiece of the display; inspired by Philadelphia’s long tradition of textile-work and weaving, it serves as an example of how using a simple material in an innovative way can captivate and unite a community. The installation uses a locally-sourced lightweight cord to wrap around prefabricated steel geometries, resulting in a gentle draped effect.

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© Tim Tiebout. Courtesy of PMA

© Tim Tiebout. Courtesy of PMA

When placed in close proximity within the museum’s Perelman atrium space, the colors begin to blur and vibrate as you move around them. Extending from Kéré’s community-driven design philosophy,Colorscape’s simple construction required no tools or skilled techniques, allowing local children to participate in its assembly.

Conceptually, the installation takes inspiration from the contrasting city plan geometries of the African village and the American city. Overlaying the organic plan of Gando with the rigid grid of Philadelphia, Kéré shows that despite the two cities’ obvious differences, underneath you can find many similarities in how the societies use architecture to provide a gradient of social spaces ranging from the individual and private to the collective and public.

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© Tim Tiebout. Courtesy of PMA

© Tim Tiebout. Courtesy of PMA

Part of the Philadelphia Museum of Modern Art’s Creative Africa series, which highlights the themes of cultural and community found in historic and contemporary African art and architecture, The Architecture of Francis Kéré: Building with Community will be on display until September 25th.

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© James Bassett-Cann

© James Bassett-Cann

Colorscape Credits:

Location: Skylit Atrium, Perelman Building, Philadelphia Museum of Art

Architects: KERE ARCHITECTURE, Diébédo Francis Kéré

Design Team: Adriana Arteaga, Blake Villwock (project architects), Daniel Heuermann, Nanna Friis

Client: Philadelphia Museum of Art (PMA)

Production / Project Management: Jack Schlecter, Jamie Montgomery, James Bassett-Cann (PMA)

Curators: Kathryn B. Hiesinger, Colin Fanning (PMA)

Audio/Video: Stephen Keever (PMA)

Collaborators: University of Pennsylvania Undergraduate Architecture students (sounds)

Fabricators: Philadelphia Museum of Art (cord assembly and structure), Moorland Studios (metal fabrication)

Volunteers: PMA staff and volunteers, Young Friends of the Philadelphia Museum of Art Executive Board and event committee, and Museum visitors

Supplier: Gladding Braid

Sponsors: The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage, Institute of Museum and Library Services, The Arlin and Neysa Adams Endowment Fund, The Kathleen C. And John J. F. Sherrerd Fund for Exhibitions, Osagie and Losengelmosogie

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© Tim Tiebout. Courtesy of PMA

© Tim Tiebout. Courtesy of PMA

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