NIA PDW002-2016 AKWA IBOM – PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP

NIA PDW002-2016 AKWA IBOM FLIER

Dear Distinguished Member,
Please find attached the NIA PDW002-2016 Akwa Ibom Workshop Flier for
your Information.
This is the first announcement flier for the 2nd PDW in Akwa Ibom State.
Workshop Fees are as follows:

1.  Financial Members – NGN 25,000.00
2.  Non-Financial Members – NGN 45,000.00

Please make this a date and plan to attend.

Thank you.

Abimbola Ajayi, fnia
HONOURARY GENERAL SECRETARY
NIGERIAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS
+234 803 326 1959

Venice Biennale 2016 Winners: Spain, Japan, Peru, NLÉ & Gabinete de Arquitectura

Venice Biennale 2016 Winners: Spain, Japan, Peru, NLÉ & Gabinete de Arquitectura , UNFINISHED / curated by Carlos Quintáns & Iñaqui Carnicero. Spanish Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
UNFINISHED / curated by Carlos Quintáns & Iñaqui Carnicero. Spanish Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

Alejandro Aravena and the jury for the 15th International Architecture Exhibition at La Biennale di Venezia have just announced the winning participations.

The Golden Lion for Best National Participation went to Spain for UNFINISHED. The jury cited Carlos Quintáns & Iñaqui Carnicero’s “concisely curated selection of emerging architects whose work shows how creativity and commitment can transcend material constraints.”

Gabinete de Arquitectura. Image © Pola MoraNLÉ accepts their Silver Lion for a Promising Young Participant in the International Exhibition "Reporting from the Front". Image © Pola MoraPaulo Mendes da Rocha receives his Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement. Image © Pola MoraIñaqui Carnicero & Carlos Quintáns with their Golden Lion.. Image © Pola Mora+13

Save this picture!

Gabinete de Arquitectura. Image Courtesy of La Biennale di Venezia

Gabinete de Arquitectura. Image Courtesy of La Biennale di Venezia

The Golden Lion for Best Participant in the International Exhibition, Reporting From the Front, went to Gabinete de Arquitectura. The award was granted to Solano Benítez, Gloria Cabral, and Solanito Benítez (all from Paraguay) for “harnessing simple materials, structural ingenuity and unskilled labour to bring architecture to underserved communities.”

Save this picture!

NLÉ's Makoko Floating School at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image Courtesy of La Biennale di Venezia

NLÉ’s Makoko Floating School at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image Courtesy of La Biennale di Venezia

NLÉ received the Silver Lion for a Promising Young Participant in the International Exhibition Reporting From the Front for his Makoko Floating School. The jury cited, “a powerful demonstration, be it in Lagos or in Venice, that architecture, at once iconic and pragmatic, can amplify the importance of education.”

Save this picture!

"OUR AMAZON FRONTLINE" / curated by Sandra Barclay and Jean Pierre Crousse. Peruvian Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image Courtesy of La Biennale di Venezia

“OUR AMAZON FRONTLINE” / curated by Sandra Barclay and Jean Pierre Crousse. Peruvian Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image Courtesy of La Biennale di Venezia

Japan and Peru took home the Special Mention in the National Participations category. For Japan, the jury particularly appreciated “the poetry of compactness to alternative forms of collective living in a dense urban space.” They congratulated Peru for bringing architecture to a remote corner of the world, making it both a venue for learning as well as a means for preserving the culture of the Amazon.

Save this picture!

en : art of nexus / curated by Yoshiyuki Yamana. Japanese Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image Courtesy of La Biennale di Venezia

en : art of nexus / curated by Yoshiyuki Yamana. Japanese Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image Courtesy of La Biennale di Venezia

Maria Giuseppina Grasso Cannizzo of Italy received Special Mention for her contribution to Reporting From the Front, which demonstrated “perseverance in using the rigours of her discipline to elevate the everyday into timeless works of architecture.”

Save this picture!

Paulo Mendes da Rocha, winner of Lifetime Achievement Award at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image © Lito Mendes da Rocha

Paulo Mendes da Rocha, winner of Lifetime Achievement Award at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image © Lito Mendes da Rocha

As it was announced in May, Paulo Mendes da Rocha received the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement.

We will continue to post updates and images.

Dispatch from the Venice Biennale: Uruguay’s underground, Germany’s construction site, Britain’s housekeeping and more from the national pavilions

"The New Zocalo" by Pita & Bloom at the US Pavilion. Photo by Andrea Dietz.

“The New Zocalo” by Pita & Bloom at the US Pavilion. Photo by Andrea Dietz.

May 26, 2016

Aravena’s Biennale for architecture to give a damn might imply a specific kind of project, but, after one day on the ground, it is clear that there is no one way for it to respond. For one thing, there is a truly incomprehensible quantity of material to cover. The volume alone speaks to the complex of energy and passion coming worldwide from the discipline. After an incomplete first pass around the Giardini and a tactical visit to the Arsenale, Venice’s two main Biennale sites, I am struck by the inconsistency and individuality across and within these many contributions. Noteworthy trends may, at some point, emerge from the crowd, but, for now, I can list a few, non-representative soundbites only:

The US Pavilion, “The Architectural Imagination,” gives us architecture as we have come to expect it. Through twelve proposals for four Detroit sites, it posits the speculative as the instrument of societal uplift, offering up wild thinking as the means of igniting change. It does so, however, as a collection of wall-mounted visuals and pedestaled scale models (see below). Within each team work, there are stand-out features; they are just masked by format.

In “Home Economics,” the British Pavilion stages abstractions of domestic space, reducing the residential to elemental associations oriented by time. It breaks out the basic needs and conditions assumed by the (sub)urban, middle-class, western notion of living—by hour, day, month, year (see below), and decade—in a bid to reconsider housing models. The experience that the installation provides is immersive and well-executed, but its relatability may be limited in demographic.

The Germans, reacting to the radical population shifts precipitated by the ongoing European immigration crisis, are grappling with unfamiliar informalities. “Making Heimat. Germany, Arrival Country” is a literal and figurative opening up to the possibility of new realities. By cutting substantial holes into the walls of their permanent pavilion and populating their exhibition space with rough graphics of data, profiles, and queries and everyday objects—including the materials that will be used to restore the pavilion to its whole form at the close of the Biennale—they are acknowledging the messy, preparatory efforts that go into self-reinvention.

The Russian pavilion, “V.D.N.H. Urban Phenomenon,” is a fantastically bizarre reminder of the histories and consequences of conflating ideology, culture, and form—or of suppressing one for the other. A sequence of distinct environments, it contains a funhouse of aesthetic, representational, and communication approaches. The digital black box becomes sculpture gallery becomes multi-media surround becomes contemplative hall—all in service to unfolding the narrative of an emblematic, national landmark.

Perhaps the most invigorating pavilion personally, Uruguay is, in “Rebootati,” making—without a budget—their exhibition through ruses, clever acts of appropriation and manipulation. In a news pamphlet, they disclose that they have found a tunnel (above) dug through and under their pavilion. The pavilion, meanwhile and gradually, is accumulating objects “taken” from other pavilions and Biennale attendees—by poncho cloaked agents and volunteers. These architectures, base components of survival, ultimately will journey to Montevideo (through the tunnel?) to take on new life.

Also notable, “The Work of Aires Mateus,” part of Aravena’s REPORTING FROM THE FRONTshow in the Giardini’s central pavilion, (re)asserts the aim for beauty as profoundly humanitarian. Their dark, quiet room, subtly lit from within deep, elegantly sculpted wall fissures, gifts a poignant refuge from the outlying excitement.

schmidt hammer lassen Designs Mixed-Use Development in Central Stockholm

schmidt hammer lassen Designs Mixed-Use Development in Central Stockholm, Courtesy of schmidt hammer lassen architects
Courtesy of schmidt hammer lassen architects

Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects has won the international competition to design a new mixed-use development in the heart of Stockholm, Sweden: Hästen 21. The new development will comprise retail, office and residential spaces, creating a “central artery” for the area with a strong visual presence adapted to the history and skyline of the existing city.

Save this picture!

Courtesy of schmidt hammer lassen architects

Courtesy of schmidt hammer lassen architects

By interpreting the characteristics of building volumes and heights in central Stockholm, the building seeks to capture the city’s essence. A modern, glazed façade is framed with natural stone to create a relationship with the adjacent buildings. Following a tradition of city-centre buildings, the corners are rounded.

Save this picture!

Courtesy of schmidt hammer lassen architects

Courtesy of schmidt hammer lassen architects

The building connects with the city through retail on the lower levels, simultaneously providing new paths through the building and creating shortcuts on the block. The introduction of an entrance plaza and street pocket enhances the integration between building and city, improving the pedestrian experience.

Save this picture!

Courtesy of schmidt hammer lassen architects

Courtesy of schmidt hammer lassen architects

Offices on the upper levels have been designed to maximize natural light, with views to the Stockholmskyline. On multiple levels, tenants can access green-roof terraces as well as meeting and conference rooms. On a separate, vertical volume, the apartments are placed, improving visibility within the city. Balconies facing the street allow residents to enjoy the evening sun.

Save this picture!

Courtesy of schmidt hammer lassen architects

Courtesy of schmidt hammer lassen architects

“The project itself is exceeding the limits of the site to be more as a full urban revitalization of a central area of Stockholm that was not really working on a pedestrian level. Historically, there used to be streets going through and between the buildings at the site, our proposal aims to bring this city life back. We are introducing small passages, shortcuts and pocket parks even at the top of the building. This way, we are creating a new neighbourhood that will be open 24/7 and not just during office hours from Monday to Friday,” explains Kristian Ahlmark, Senior Partner at Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects.

Save this picture!

Courtesy of schmidt hammer lassen architects

Courtesy of schmidt hammer lassen architects

The developers and architects hope to create a building flexible enough to continue to grow with the city of Stockholm over its lifetime, as changes occur in both the urban fabric and in the commercial market.

  • Architects

  • Structural Engineer

    Tyréns AB
  • Mechanical Engineer

    PO Andersson AB
  • Electrical Engineer

    Mats Ström berg Ing. Byrå AB
  • Fire Consultant

    Brandkonsulten AB
  • Elevator Consultant

    HissKonsulterna
  • LEED Consultant

  • Project Manager

    Forsen Project AB
  • Client

    Pembroke Real Estate
  • Area

    43128.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

    Courtesy of schmidt hammer lassen architects

Competition Proposal by Preliminary Research Office Thinks “Outside the Box”

Competition Proposal by Preliminary Research Office Thinks “Outside the Box”, Exterior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of Preliminary Research Office
Exterior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of Preliminary Research Office

Preliminary Research Office has revealed their entry to a competition to design the new civic center for the city of Ryde, Australia. The project uses a series of boxes at different scales to inform the organization of both the building and the public spaces. Following a competition of 175 entries from 49 countries, the project did not make the shortlist. However, its approach addresses the fundamental needs of a civic center to be dynamic, flexible and human-scale.

Aerial Rendered View. Image Courtesy of Preliminary Research OfficeExterior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of Preliminary Research OfficeExterior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of Preliminary Research OfficeAerial Rendered View. Image Courtesy of Preliminary Research Office+15

Save this picture!

Exterior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of Preliminary Research Office

Exterior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of Preliminary Research Office

The competition called for an iconic project that would “encapsulate the urban identity of the area.” Located at the entrance to the municipality, the 16,500 square-meter site has a frontage of 260-meters along a six-lane road, and is located 12km west of Sydney, sitting on the crest of a ridgeline. The proposal was required to include civil and administrative offices, a public plaza/open space, commercial activities and housing.

Save this picture!

Program Diagram. Image Courtesy of Preliminary Research Office

Program Diagram. Image Courtesy of Preliminary Research Office

The building is organized into two tall boxes, stacked atop three large, flat boxes, with four smaller boxes situated at ground level. Each box houses different civic and public programs, with the human-scale of each box creating a miniature “village” for citizens and visitors to explore.

Save this picture!

Exterior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of Preliminary Research Office

Exterior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of Preliminary Research Office

The tall boxes house administrative and residential program, with more specific programs, like the CivicCouncil Chamber, Committee Meeting Rooms, Offices and Residential units stacked on top of each other. The space between these programmatic areas act as a “breathable double-skin,” with vertical openings enhancing natural ventilation throughout the building.

Save this picture!

Exterior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of Preliminary Research Office

Exterior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of Preliminary Research Office

The flatter boxes on the ground level orient themselves according to their relationship with the surrounding context. They serve as foyers and receptions for the taller boxes, as well as housing more public programs like performance spaces, community meeting rooms and commercial spaces. In between the boxes is a pedestrian circulation area, combining paths, green landscape and a public plaza.

Save this picture!

Exterior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of Preliminary Research Office

Exterior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of Preliminary Research Office

Each box unfolds, its flaps connecting it with nearby boxes, acting as canopies to semi-outdoor spaces underneath, and extending the design metaphor to be “outside of the box”

See the four shortlisted entries here.

Website Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: