Wall Panels ALUCOBOND® naturAL | Alucobond

More about this product

ALUCOBOND naturAL wall panels amplify the natural character of aluminium to enhance the design of architectural projects. The finely textured aluminium surfaces of the series naturAL PURE scatter light for a close-up visual effect, while retaining the look and lustre of smooth aluminium from afar. NaturAL FINESSE is a subtle rapprochement to real metals without its inconvenients creating a refined metallic look. Both series are the ultimate cladding solution for achieving the sophisticated tone that your architectural vision demands. Now, your entrance, columns, and pylons can make a bold statement – without upsetting your budget.

Paläon Museum, Germany
Alucobond® naturAL Reflect
Holzer Kobler Architekturen: Photography by Jan Bitter

Paläon Museum, Germany Alucobond® naturAL Reflect Holzer Kobler Architekturen: Photography by Jan Bitter

CHARACTERISTICS

  • Flatness
  • Low weight
  • Weather resistance
  • Rigidity
  • Formability
  • Recyclable

ALUCOBOND naturAL surfaces are easy to clean and care for, unlike other metal sheets (i. e. solid sheets with a briushed surface or real metals). In addition their weather resistance and corrosion behaviour are superior. Both attractive and ingenious ALUCOBOND naturAL is the ideal material to create the difference for interior and exterior architecture.
Selecting ALUCOBOND material for projects which require environmental friendly materials is literally a natural choice, since it is fully recyclable.ALUCOBOND® brings a superior metal panel image to any project and is known for its lightweight qualities, wide range of color and finish options and the ability to form textures or curves.

SPECIFICATIONS:

Alucobond® Composition
› Aluminum facings in 0.020″ nominal thickness
(interior and exterior to ensure flatness)
› Polyethylene core available in 3mm, 4mm and 6mm thicknesses (PE)
› Proprietary fire-resistant core available in 4mm thickness only (Plus)
Sheet Widths 
› Standard coil coated widths 50″ and 62″
› Standard anodized widths 62″
› Custom width 40″
Sheet Lengths
› Standard lengths 146” and 196”
› Custom lengths up to a maximum of 360”

Wall Panel Alucobond naturAL Rout & Return Dry Seal, Wet Seal & Rains Screen detail drawings.

Available Color Lines

ALUCOBOND® Classic colors consist of a wide range of colors currently available in inventory. These colors provide architects and designers with a color pallet capable of meeting the needs and time frames of most projects.

The ALUCOBOND® Contemporary  colors provide architects and designers with colors that expand beyond our Classic color pallet. These colors aid in the inspiration behind many of today’s projects by giving the imagination endless possibilities to work from. We pride ourselves in our ability to match most custom colors, and our Contemporary finishes are just scratching the surface of possibilities.

Our ALUCOBOND® naturAL colors amplify the natural beauty and character of many natural elements to enhance the design of your architectural project while maintaining the durability and lite weight properties of aluminum.

ALUCOBOND® Spectra colors are transitional finishes which celebrate the natural color shifts that occur in materials that affect everyday life; the sublet nuances and color contrasts found readily in nature, the glowing luster and sheen in modern metals and the color shifts found in today’s luxury goods. Color adds fascination to the world, ALUCOBOND® Spectra colors add fascination to architectural design.

Greek Pavilion at 2016 Venice Biennale to Emphasize Importance of Architectural Collaboration

Greek Pavilion at 2016 Venice Biennale to Emphasize Importance of Architectural Collaboration, © Petra Mara, Nefeli Papanagiotou
© Petra Mara, Nefeli Papanagiotou

The Greek Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale will be hosting an exhibition titled #ThisIsACo-op, which underscores the role of collaboration in architecture. Through a series of displayed research and discussions, the exhibition aims to understand how architects may need to unite on different “fronts” of world crises, including the refugee crisis, the housing crisis, and the crisis of the architectural profession, among others.

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© George Papadimas, Christine Tzevelekou

© George Papadimas, Christine Tzevelekou

This pavilion will host a series of “workshops and site-specific events” that will unite visitors into one cooperative network. It will become a place for meeting, discussion, and participation. The site will “provide a space for mobilizing collective architectural bodies, locally and internationally, as well as a place for developing claims and coordinating actions.”

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Courtesy of The Greek Pavilion

Courtesy of The Greek Pavilion

Events hosted at the Greek Pavilion are organized into a tripartite structure: Syneleusis (assembly), Synergeia, and Symbiosis. Outside of the pavilion, the curatorial team, which is made up of members of the Association of Greek Architects, will host a series of events in both Venice and Greece, throughout the duration of the Biennale, which will be shown on screens in the pavilion.

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© RIZA3architects

© RIZA3architects

The site also contains a reading room, and areas where documentaries about the multi-faceted crises architecture is currently facing can be seen. Through research, meetings, and discussions, #ThisIsACo-op aims to unite architects and find solutions through collaboration.

Learn more, here.

Students at UIC Barcelona Create 1:1 Plans of Famous Buildings

In early 2016, we introduced Vardehaugen, a Norwegian office that created a series of life sized drawings of their projects in their own backyard. After publishing this exercise on our site, Spanish architect and academic Alberto T. Estévez reached out to tell us that this same exercise has been carried out at ESARQ (UIC Barcelona) for the past 10 years with second and third year architecture students. According to Estévez, the exercise “represents something irreplaceable: it brings you closer to experiencing life-sized spaces of classic works of architecture” from the Farnsworth house to José Antonio Coderch’s Casa de la Marina.

About 10 years ago I had an idea for a special teaching exercise, one that I thought would be interesting and instructive at the same time. So I started doing the practice class we’ve been talking about with architecture students in their second and third year of study at ESARQ (UIC Barcelona): the School of Architecture, which I founded 20 years ago as the first Director at the International University of Catalonia.

Now, we do the lesson every year in the Architectural Composition class that I teach, which discusses the theory and history of architecture.

Coderch Building. Image © Alberto T. EstévezCoderch Building. Image © Alberto T. EstévezCoderch Building. Image © Alberto T. EstévezCoderch Building. Image © Alberto T. Estévez+25

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Coderch Building. Image © Alberto T. Estévez

Coderch Building. Image © Alberto T. Estévez

I have the students reproduce 1:1 scale floor plans of works that are specially chosen for the occasion. To do this they are given the floor plans of a specific building, and after an explanation of what the exercise is about, they break up into teams and trace the layout across campus with string, tape, and chalk.

Out of all the examples that we’ve done, we’ve seen that it’s best to start with Ludwig Mies van der Rohe: first, for his obvious relevance and also because the activity should be done in one morning, something that his simplicity allows. Additionally, this way the subject matter of the courses deals with the same time period as the works that are being reconstructed.

The sequence that has worked best for us over time is: first, in the Architectural Composition 1 course (2nd year, 1st Semester), the Farnsworth House  (Plano, 1946-1951), and then, in Architectural Composition 2 (2nd year, 2nd Semester), the 860-880 Lake Shore Drive Apartments (Chicago, 1949-51).

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Farnsworth House. Image © Alberto T. Estévez

Farnsworth House. Image © Alberto T. Estévez

Finally, in Architectural Composition 3 (3rd year, 1st Semester), the students recreate Jose Antonio Coderch’s Marina house (Barcelona, 1952-1954), the best Spanish architect from the 50s to the 70s. This house has a very complex floor plan to recreate, but provides a highly educational experience due to the skillful details it requires. It ends up being an exciting contrast, going from Mies’ plans and then ending with the one from Coderch. The last one we also go see in person, since it’s right there in our city, Barcelona. It’s the perfect finishing touch for this activity.

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Chicago Apartaments. Image © Alberto T. Estévez

Chicago Apartaments. Image © Alberto T. Estévez

This whole exercise is key to learning something basic for an architect, how to make a 1:1 scale floorplan from a  drawing with a 1:100 scale, or something similar. And above all it represents something irreplaceable, what it’s like to begin to experience real life spaces. In this case, through classic works of architecture.

Actually, there’s a bit of  “magic” in the gradual process of the students recreating the floor plan: they start off in an empty space, with just a piece of paper in their hands, and they end up being able to walk around a building that they’re able to imagine in its true scale. In short, it’s a good way to understand, in the most illustrative manner, the measurements and sizes of spaces by famous architects, and that are normally only seen as small drawings in books or online.

Alberto T. Estévez is a Professor at the School of Architecture (Universitat Internacional de Catalunya) Barcelona, founded in 1996. In 2000 he also created the Masters in Biodigital Architecture at the same institution. Estévez is the author of more than a hundred publications, including his latest book, entitled “Biodigital Architecture & Genetics: Writings / Escritos“.

Profesor: Alberto T. Estévez
Subjects: Architectural Composition (grades 2 and 3)
Location: ESARQ, School of Architecture, Barcelona UIC (International University of Catalonia), Barcelona, Spain
Years: 2007 to date

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