Vo Trong Nghia Proposes Green City Hall for Bac Ninh City

Vo Trong Nghia Proposes Green City Hall for Bac Ninh City, Courtesy of Vo Trong Nghia Architects
Courtesy of Vo Trong Nghia Architects

Vo Trong Nghia Architects (VTNA) has unveiled a proposal for a Green City Hall in Vietnam’s Bac Ninh City. Designed as a vertical park, the 36,000 square meter proposal is meant to serve as a new symbol for a traditionally agricultural, but rapidly industrializing area of Northern Vietnam. The VTNA proposal is part of a larger plan to develop a new urban area on the edge of the old city, and is designed to be a catalyst for future green developments in the area.

Courtesy of Vo Trong Nghia ArchitectsCourtesy of Vo Trong Nghia ArchitectsCourtesy of Vo Trong Nghia ArchitectsCourtesy of Vo Trong Nghia Architects+8

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Courtesy of Vo Trong Nghia Architects

Courtesy of Vo Trong Nghia Architects

The building is composed of two volumes that lean towards each other – think shuffling cards with a riffle or dovetail method – in a gesture that is meant to symbolize a unity of citizens and government.. Cultural facilities in the structure’s base give way to government offices in one tower with party offices and a citizen center in the other. The two towers culminate in an observation deck.

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Courtesy of Vo Trong Nghia Architects

Courtesy of Vo Trong Nghia Architects

AIA Names Top 10 Most Sustainable Projects of 2016

AIA Names Top 10 Most Sustainable Projects of 2016, The J. Craig Venter Institute; San Diego
/ ZGF Architects LLP. Image © Nick Merrick
The J. Craig Venter Institute; San Diego
/ ZGF Architects LLP. Image © Nick Merrick

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) and its Committee on the Environment (COTE) have selected the top ten sustainable architecture and ecological design projects for 2016.

Now in its 20th year, the COTE Top Ten Awards program honors projects that protect and enhance the environment through an integrated approach to architecture, natural systems, and technology.

A recently released study, entitled Lessons from the Leading Edge, reports that design projects recognized through this program are “outpacing the industry by virtually every standard of performance.”

The 2016 COTE Top Ten Green Projects are:

Biosciences Research Building (BRB); Galway, Ireland
/ Payette and Reddy Architecture + Urbanism

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Biosciences Research Building (BRB); Galway, Ireland
/ Payette and Reddy Architecture + Urbanism . Image © Warren Jagger

Biosciences Research Building (BRB); Galway, Ireland
/ Payette and Reddy Architecture + Urbanism . Image © Warren Jagger

The design of the BRB embraces the moderate climate of Ireland. By locating low-load spaces along the perimeter of the building, the project is able to take advantage of natural ventilation as the sole conditioning strategy for the majority of the year and is supplemented less than 10% of the year with radiant heating. Due to this approach, 45% of this intensive research building is able to function without mechanical ventilation. This is an extremely simple, yet radical approach and is rarely implemented to even a modest extent in similar laboratories in comparable U.S. climates.

Center for Sustainable Landscapes (CSL); Pittsburgh /
The Design Alliance Architects

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Center for Sustainable Landscapes (CSL); Pittsburgh /
The Design Alliance Architects. Image © Denmarsh Photography

Center for Sustainable Landscapes (CSL); Pittsburgh /
The Design Alliance Architects. Image © Denmarsh Photography

The CSL is an education, research and administration facility at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens. Designed to be the greenest building in the world, it generates all of its own energy and treats all storm and sanitary water captured on-site. The CSL is the first and only building to meet four of the highest green certifications: the Living Building Challenge, LEED Platinum, WELL Building Platinum, and Four-Stars Sustainable SITES. As an integral part of the Phipps visitor experience, the CSL focuses attention on the important intersection between the built and natural environments, demonstrating that human and environmental health are inextricably connected.

Exploratorium at Pier 15; San Francisco /
EHDD

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Exploratorium at Pier 15; San Francisco /
EHDD. Image © Bruce Damonte

Exploratorium at Pier 15; San Francisco /
EHDD. Image © Bruce Damonte

The Exploratorium is an interactive science museum that also demonstrates innovation and sustainability in its design and construction. The building takes advantage of the historic pier shed’s natural lighting and the 800-foot-long roof provided room for a 1.3 megawatt photovoltaic array. The water of the bay is used for cooling and heating. Materials were used that are both sustainable and durable enough to withstand a harsh maritime climate. The project is certified LEED Platinum and is close to reaching its goal of being the country’s largest Net Zero energy museum and an industry model for what is possible in contemporary museums.

H-E-B at Mueller; Austin, TX
/ Lake|Flato Architects, H-E-B Design + Construction, Selser Schaefer Architects

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H-E-B at Mueller; Austin, TX
/ Lake|Flato Architects, H-E-B Design + Construction, Selser Schaefer Architects. Image © Casey Dunn

H-E-B at Mueller; Austin, TX
/ Lake|Flato Architects, H-E-B Design + Construction, Selser Schaefer Architects. Image © Casey Dunn

H-E-B at Mueller is an 83,587-square-foot LEED Gold and Austin Energy Green Building 4-Stars retail store and fresh food market, including a pharmacy, café, community meeting room, outdoor gathering spaces, and fuel station. It serves 16 neighborhoods and is located in Mueller, a sustainable, mixed-use urban Austin community. Strategies include a collaborative research, goal-setting and design process; integrated chilled water HVAC and refrigeration systems; the first North American supermarket propane refrigeration system; optimized daylighting; 169 kW roof-top solar array; electric vehicle charging; all LED lighting; and reclaimed water use for landscape irrigation, toilets, and cooling tower make-up water.

Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation; Berkeley, CA /
Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects

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Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation; Berkeley, CA /
Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects. Image © Tim Griffith

Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation; Berkeley, CA /
Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects. Image © Tim Griffith

Founded on the conviction that design can help address some of society’s most pressing challenges, the Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation at UC Berkeley is devoted to introducing sustainable design innovation at the core of university life. The project provides a new interdisciplinary hub for students and teachers from across the university who work at the intersection of design and technology. It is designed as both a collaborative, project-based educational space and a symbol to the region of the University’s commitment to sustainable innovation, modelling high-density / low-carbon living and learning by reducing energy use 90% below national baseline.

Rene Cazenave Apartments; San Francisco
/ Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects and Saida + Sullivan Design Partners, Associated Architect

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Rene Cazenave Apartments; San Francisco
/ Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects and Saida + Sullivan Design Partners, Associated Architect. Image © Tim Griffith

Rene Cazenave Apartments; San Francisco
/ Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects and Saida + Sullivan Design Partners, Associated Architect. Image © Tim Griffith

This supportive housing for formerly chronically homeless individuals replaces a former parking lot and freeway off-ramp with a high density, transit oriented, and healthy living alternative. Filtered ventilation, low emitting materials, ample daylight and views combine to aid the residents, many with mental and physical disabilities. Energy costs for the residents and non-profit owner are minimized by a combination of high efficiency lighting and hydronic heating, a continuously insulated rain-screen building envelope and a roof top solar canopy with both hot water and photovoltaic panels. Water is carefully managed by a vegetated roof, smart irrigation, a courtyard storm water tank and reclaimed water piping.

The Dixon Water Foundation Josey Pavilion; Decatur, TX /
Lake|Flato Architects

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The Dixon Water Foundation Josey Pavilion; Decatur, TX /
Lake|Flato Architects. Image © Casey Dunn

The Dixon Water Foundation Josey Pavilion; Decatur, TX /
Lake|Flato Architects. Image © Casey Dunn

The Josey Pavilion is a multi-functional education and meeting center that supports the mission of the Dixon Water Foundation to promote healthy watersheds through sustainable land management. Traditionally livestock has caused more harm than good by overgrazing and not allowing native prairies to play their important role in habitat and watershed protection, and carbon sequestration. As a certified Living Building, the Josey Pavilion facilitates a deeper understanding of how grazing livestock as well as the built environment can work to do more good than harm. Just like the Heritage Live Oak that defines the site, the building tempers the climate and enhances visitor experience by shading the sun, blocking the wind, and providing protected views.

The J. Craig Venter Institute; San Diego
/ ZGF Architects LLP

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The J. Craig Venter Institute; San Diego
/ ZGF Architects LLP. Image © Nick Merrick

The J. Craig Venter Institute; San Diego
/ ZGF Architects LLP. Image © Nick Merrick

This not-for-profit research institute, dedicated to the advancement of the science of genomics, was in need of a permanent West Coast home. Their commitment to environmental stewardship led to challenging the architects to design a net-zero energy laboratory building, the first in the U.S. The result is a LEED-Platinum certified, 44,607-square-foot building comprised of a wet laboratory wing and an office / dry laboratory wing surrounding a central courtyard, all above a partially below-grade parking structure for 112 cars. The holistic approach to the design revolved around energy performance, water conservation, and sustainable materials.

University of Wyoming – Visual Arts Facility; Laramie, WY
/ Hacker Architects and Malone Belton Able PC

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West Branch of the Berkeley Public Library; Berkeley, CA
/ Harley Ellis Devereaux. Image © Lara Swimmer

West Branch of the Berkeley Public Library; Berkeley, CA
/ Harley Ellis Devereaux. Image © Lara Swimmer

The Visual Arts Facility (VAF) consolidates the fine arts program from its scattered locations throughout the campus. The building provides a teaching and learning environment that is both state-of-the-art in occupational safety and in its concern for discharge of pollutants from building. The roof area is fitted with one of the largest solar evacuated tube installations in the U.S. Heat flows from the evacuated tubes to support the hydronic radiant floors, domestic hot water, and pretreat outside air for ventilation. The building was oriented and shaped through a process of studying the sun’s interaction with interior spaces, simultaneously distributing reflected light while eliminating solar gain.

West Branch of the Berkeley Public Library; Berkeley, CA
/ Harley Ellis Devereaux

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West Branch of the Berkeley Public Library; Berkeley, CA
/ Harley Ellis Devereaux. Image © David Wakely

West Branch of the Berkeley Public Library; Berkeley, CA
/ Harley Ellis Devereaux. Image © David Wakely

The new 9,500-square-foot West Branch of the Berkeley Public Library is the first certified Living Building Challenge zero net energy public library in California. The building’s energy footprint was minimized through integrated strategies for daylighting (the building is 97% daylit), natural ventilation and a high performance building envelope. An innovative wind chimney provides cross-ventilation while protecting the library interior from street noise. Renewable energy on site includes photovoltaic panels and solar thermal panels for radiant heating and cooling and domestic hot water. The library exceeds the 2030 Challenge and complies with Berkeley’s recently-enacted Climate Action Plan.

News, project descriptions, and images via the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

Salerno Maritime Terminal / Zaha Hadid Architects

© Hélène Binet
© Hélène Binet

© Hélène Binet© Hélène Binet© Hélène Binet© Hélène Binet+25

  • ZHA Design Team

    Vincenzo Barilari, Andrea Parenti, Anja Simons, Giovanna Sylos Labini, Cedric Libert, Filippo Innocenti, Paolo Zilli, Lorenzo Grifantini,
  • ZHA Competition Team

    Paola Cattarin, Sonia Villaseca, Christos Passas, Chris Dopheide
  • Local Executive Architect

    Interplan Seconda – Alessandro Gubitosi
  • Costing

    Building Consulting – Pasquale Miele
  • Structural Engineers

    Ingeco – Francesco Sylos Labini, Ove Arup & Partners (prelim. design) – Sophie Le Bourva
  • M&E Engineers

    Macchiaroli and Partners – Roberto Macchiaroli, Itaca srl – Felice Marotta, Ove Arup & Partners (prelim. design)
  • Maritime/Transport Engineering

    Ove Arup & Partners (London) – Greg Heigh
  • Lighting

    Equation Lighting Design (London) – Mark Hensmann
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© Hélène Binet

© Hélène Binet

From the architect. Inaugurated on 25 April 2016, the new Salerno Maritime Terminal by Zaha Hadid Architects is integral to the city’s urban plan. Begun by Mayor Vincenzo De Luca, now Governor of the Campania Region, and continued under the city’s current Mayor Vincenzo Napoli, the 1993 plan forSalerno targeted the development of essential projects and programs for the social, economic and environmental regeneration of the city. As part of the 1993 plan, Zaha Hadid Architects won the international competition in 2000 to design the new terminal.

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Site Plan

Site Plan

Located on the public quay that extends into Salerno’s working harbor and marina, the new maritime terminal continues the city’s relationship with the sea and establishes new links; connecting Salerno’s rich maritime traditions with its historic urban fabric and beyond to the hills that frame the city.

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© Hélène Binet

© Hélène Binet

Like an oyster, the terminal’s hard, asymmetric shell protects the softer elements within; sheltering passengers from the intense Mediterranean sun during the popular tourist season.

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© Hélène Binet

© Hélène Binet

The new maritime terminal is composed of three primary interlocking components: administration offices for national border controls and shipping lines; the terminal for international ferries and cruise ships from around the world; and the terminal for the local and regional ferries.

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© Hélène Binet

© Hélène Binet
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Floor Plans

Floor Plans
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© Hélène Binet

© Hélène Binet

The quayside gently rises as passengers approach the terminal from the city, indicating the gradually sloping path of ramps within the building which raise passengers to the embarking level of large ships and ferries. The terminal’s interior arrangement orientates and leads passengers through a sequence of interior spaces that flow into each other and are organized around focal points such as the restaurant and the waiting lounge.

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© Hélène Binet

© Hélène Binet

Local and regional ferry commuters move through the terminal quickly, arriving on ground level and ascending via ramps to reach the upper and vessel entrance. Passengers travelling on international ferries and cruise ships are guided seamlessly through check-in, passport, security and customs controls to their ship. Arriving passengers follow a similar progression through the terminal with the inclusion of the luggage reclaim area.

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Sections

Sections

At night, the glow of the terminal near the harbour entrance will act as a lighthouse to the port, welcoming visitors to the city.

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© Hélène Binet

© Hélène Binet

The new terminal operates, both functionally and visually, as a smooth transition between land and sea; a coastal land formation that mediates between solid and liquid.
From its terraces and windows, the terminal offers spectacular views of the Amalfi Coast, the Gulf ofSalerno and the Cilento. Positano, Capri, Paestum and Pompei are also nearby. The new terminal will greatly improve the accessibility and experience for visitors to the region’s renowned cultural attractions, coastline and countryside.

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© Hélène Binet

© Hélène Binet

The new Salerno Maritime Terminal will enable the port of Salerno to increase arrivals of ferry and cruise ships by 500,000 additional passengers each year, which would create up to 2,000 new jobs in the city’s hospitality, services and retail sectors.

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