MVRDV Designs Reusable Pavilion for Bogotá Book Fair

MVRDV Designs Reusable Pavilion for Bogotá Book Fair, © Punto Avi
© Punto Avi

MVRDV’s design for the Dutch exhibition “Hola Holanda” at the Book Fair of Bogotá (FILBO) features amodular system of crates that will be repurposed as neighbourhood libraries after the Book Fair ends. Avoiding the waste of resources created by one-time pavilions, the Dutch firm has introduced a playful element of sustainability to the fair, maintaining its spirit even after the event ends.

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© Punto Avi

© Punto Avi

FILBO, is one of Latin America’s most important trade events, partnering with a guest country each year to host a main pavilion. This year, the Netherlands and Colombia partook in an exchange of knowledge and culture, with an exhibition designed by Dutch designer Irma Boom and the Dutch Embassy in Colombia.

At the center of this activity, MVRDV’s pavilion circumvents the common problem of pavilions and exhibitions disappearing after an event, rather than benefiting surrounding communities. The pavilions within the Dutch exhibition were designed as a collection of over one thousand “vividly coloured”wooden creates, which can be easily deconstructed and re-assembled.

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Circular Bookshop. Image © Punto Avi

Circular Bookshop. Image © Punto Avi

Each unit uses standardised wooden panels, leaving little waste material, and allowing “unlimited possibilities for reconstruction throughout their lifetime.” After the event, the pavilions will be distributed throughout Bogotá as libraries, and social and education spaces.

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Exhibition Layout Diagram. Image Courtesy of MVRDV

Exhibition Layout Diagram. Image Courtesy of MVRDV

“Our design is a village, an accessible, democratic design for all, executed in the best Dutch spirit with some fun,” says MVRDV founding partner Jacob van Rijs. “But it was important also to comment on the trade fair system. Instead of trashing an expensive pavilion after a short use we wanted it to be reused adding long term value to the city.”

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Exhibition Front. Image © Punto Avi

Exhibition Front. Image © Punto Avi

The exhibition will be open until May 2.

Free-standing toilet / wall-hung / ceramic / rimless SUBWAY 2.0

Free-standing toilet / wall-hung / ceramic / rimless SUBWAY 2.0 Villeroy & Boch

Characteristics

  • Type:

    free-standing, wall-hung

  • Material:

    ceramic

  • Options:

    rimless

Description

Four models have been added to the DirectFlush portfolio for Subway 2.0. For the first time Subway 2.0 now offers floor-standing, rimless WCs and a matching, floor-standing bidet in the new design. They feature uniformly smooth surfaces and a contemporary, elegant look. A rimless Compact WC and a rimless Comfort WC have been added to the range of wall-mounted models.

The impressive Subway 2.0 additions offer …
◾A new type of hygiene: All the models are equipped with DirectFlush and the water-saving AquaReduct flush.
◾Something for the more demanding: The wall-mounted Comfort WC with its ergonomic ComfortSeat.
◾An optimum use of space: The wall-mounted Compact WCs with small projection now available with DirectFlush.
◾The ideal option for renovations: Floor-standing, with or without ceramic cistern.
◾Good looks: Smooth outer, easy-clean surface.
◾ User-friendly features: Features such as SoftClosing and QuickRelease come as standard with the Subway 2.0 WC seats and SlimSeats.

Jean Nouvel Unveils Design for Hotel and Residential Tower in São Paulo

Jean Nouvel Unveils Design for Hotel and Residential Tower in São Paulo, View of the southwest façade. Image Courtesy of Grupo Allard
View of the southwest façade. Image Courtesy of Grupo Allard

Jean Nouvel has unveiled the design of his latest project: a 22-story tower located near Avenida Paulista inSão Paulo. The skyscraper, dubbed Rosewood Tower, is part of Cidade Matarazzo, a 27,000-square-meter site containing historic buildings that once made up the Filomena Matarazzo maternity hospital. A heritage-listed site, the Allard Group is restoring the buildings and creating a cultural center, of which Nouvel’s new tower will be a central component.

Set to contain a hotel as well as residential units, Nouvel’s tower is designed to be a vertical continuation of the local landscape. Thus, the nearly 100-meter-tall tower develops at different levels, forming terraces and large gardens with small and medium-sized trees.

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Courtesy of Grupo Allard

Courtesy of Grupo Allard

The hotel and residential complex will have 151 guest rooms and 122 residential suites, two restaurants, a bar and a “caviar lounge,” in addition to three pools, a spa and a fitness area.

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View of the northwest façade. Image Courtesy of Grupo Allard

View of the northwest façade. Image Courtesy of Grupo Allard

“Matarazzo Park is a remnant. More than a remnant, I would say it’s an oasis. It’s a space of calm urbanisation. A space of incredible trees: figs and magnolias. The hospital in the middle of the grounds is a sort of mini-town, very well organised around patios. Surrounding this little gem is a chaotic metropolis. What is most interesting for me is being able to work with the memory of the place,” said Jean Nouvel in a press release.

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Entrance from Itapeva street. Image Courtesy of Grupo Allard

Entrance from Itapeva street. Image Courtesy of Grupo Allard

São Paulo and Paris-based Triptyque will be the executive architect for the tower as well as for the restoration and repurposing of the pre-existing buildings.

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Courtesy of Grupo Allard

Courtesy of Grupo Allard

Nouvel’s tower is set to be completed by the end of 2018.

Shuhei Endo on Why Architecture Should Be “Paramodern”

Shuhei Endo on Why Architecture Should Be "Paramodern", Bubbletecture H. Image © Courtesy of Shuhei Endo / Paramodern
Bubbletecture H. Image © Courtesy of Shuhei Endo / Paramodern

Japan has long been one of the centers of production when it comes to avant-garde architecture, stretching back to the middle of the 20th century with Modernist masters such as Kenzo Tange. As one of Japan’s new, emerging architectural leaders Shuhei Endo – the founder of architecture firm Paramodern – believes the country is still well positioned at the forefront of architecture, creating new responses to the concept of modernity itself. In the second interview from our series covering “Japan’s New Masters,” Ebrahim Abdoh speaks to Endo about what it means to be “Modern” in the modern world, and how these ideas have influenced his architecture.

Ebrahim Abdoh: What is your earliest memory of wanting to be an architect?

Shuhei Endo: When I was a child at elementary school, one day, the teacher took our class to an architecture exhibit in Osaka. The year was 1962. I remember seeing all the drawings, and models of these strange buildings. It was that day that I heard the words “architect” and “architecture” for the first time. Many years later, I applied to university to study architecture and got in. I always wanted to see the world. In my first few years of university, I went on a trip all over Europe. If that little exhibit I went to in Osaka was my baptism, then Rome was my confirmation. When I walked into the Pantheon… that is when I knew that I had made the right choice.

Slowtecture M. Image © Courtesy of Shuhei Endo / ParamodernRooftecture OT2. Image © Stirling ElmendorfRooftecture S. Image © Courtesy of Shuhei Endo / ParamodernBubbletecture H. Image © Courtesy of Shuhei Endo / Paramodern+13

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Slowtecture M. Image © Courtesy of Shuhei Endo / Paramodern

Slowtecture M. Image © Courtesy of Shuhei Endo / Paramodern

EA: What would you say was the most important lesson you learnt at University?

SE: To travel. I traveled so much… internationally and domestically – all over Japan. In that sense, traveling is not a lesson, it is a tool. What you learn, “the lessons” as you say, are taught by you to you – they are everything you see, everything you notice, pick up and adapt to your own ideas. I still don’t know if architecture can be taught; for me it’s just a journey.

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Bubbletecture M. Image © Courtesy of Shuhei Endo / Paramodern

Bubbletecture M. Image © Courtesy of Shuhei Endo / Paramodern

EA: Most architects I’ve asked that same question of usually answer with a quote from a famous former professor or master of theirs. From your answer, it sounds as though you are casting doubt on the whole university experience. In your mind, how necessary or pertinent do you deem university to the formation of an architect and specifically to your former self?

SE:I did not benefit and do not see the point in the academic side of university. And for me university was not about academia. I benefited a lot from the social aspect of university. Think of it as a place that groups young people with the same passions and ambition under the tutelage or supervision of your idols. University is crucial for the conversations, the discussions, and all the interaction between friends and professors. Just as you learn from travelling, you learn through your relationships with others.

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Bubbletecture M. Image © Courtesy of Shuhei Endo / Paramodern

Bubbletecture M. Image © Courtesy of Shuhei Endo / Paramodern

EA: On top of managing your practice, you are a professor at Kobe University. If there is one thing you’d want your students to take from you, what would it be?

SE: To move forward, you need to look back. The importance of history, and ancient history of architecture… Egypt, Greece, Rome, etc… including traditional Japanese architecture. I cannot stress enough the importance of the past.

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Bubbletecture M. Image © Courtesy of Shuhei Endo / Paramodern

Bubbletecture M. Image © Courtesy of Shuhei Endo / Paramodern

EA: Where did your firm’s name “Paramodern” come from?

SE: Modernism, with a capital M, has long been dead. People who wrongly say “I am a modernist” are merely adopting a style; a style which no longer has the same purpose because the parameters have changed so much since the day the term was first coined. However Modernism as a design method, as an approach or strategy to the constraints of a particular site or project, is absolute… for now. All “Paramodern” means, is appreciating Modernist principles, all the while acknowledging that the parameters of architecture as well as the built and social environment have changed, meaning necessarily that the resulting project will be different and also maybe look different…hence Para-modern.

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Rooftecture OT2. Image © Stirling Elmendorf

Rooftecture OT2. Image © Stirling Elmendorf

EA: So is that a critique of Modernism and The International Style? Is it a critique of the architecture that students are still overwhelmingly taught today at University, and mostly end up imitating to a certain degree? In your previous answer, it seems to be that you are not criticizing modernism, in fact you praise it, but only within its context. So are you criticizing Modernism as a whole, or just Modernism in 2015?

SE:The world and everyone in it do not progress at the same time. Some get there early, and some a bit late. There is a sort of cultural time-lag between individuals and groups of individuals. In my opinion, Japanese architects are very much at the forefront of architecture, and we have been very successful at reworking modernism, and remolding it, into something culturally appropriate.It is my belief for instance that climate-change is the single greatest threat to the world and our species. In Japan we understand that, because we bear the brunt of Mother Nature’s brutality.

Many of my buildings are the results of experimentation with cheap, reusable, and sustainable materials. They may not look as glossy as these vast concrete villas in Ibiza, or as futuristic as the skyscrapers in Dubai, but in a way, what I build is more modern, because it is not only more appropriate for the world we live in, but also the world we are moving dangerously fast toward. Modernism to me was the result of the combination of democracy and capitalism. However both democracy and capitalism have changed, and continue to change, so it’s now time for something new, bearing in mind that something new might look a little bit older than what we’re used to seeing… think a little bit less “Star Wars,” and a little more “Waterworld” with Kevin Costner.

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Bubbletecture H. Image © Courtesy of Shuhei Endo / Paramodern

Bubbletecture H. Image © Courtesy of Shuhei Endo / Paramodern

EA: What are you immediate and longer term ambitions?

SE: I have one ultimate dream as an architect… To design and build an aquarium. I have done many projects across Asia and Japan, and would like to get to do some projects in Europe and also Africa. To be able design for another culture is a very exciting prospect.

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Slowtecture M. Image © Courtesy of Shuhei Endo / Paramodern

Slowtecture M. Image © Courtesy of Shuhei Endo / Paramodern

EA: Do you ever question or doubt yourself?

SE: Yes. All the time. I am in a constant and never-ending conversation with myself. It is actually very annoying. Not only do I question myself, I answer myself as well. But regardless of the answer I give myself, be it good or bad, I deal with it, put it aside, and keep on going. Doubt is a natural stage in the development of any venture or project, and the trick is to think of it merely as a stage; as in a stage to get past to get to the next stage. Otherwise no one would ever accomplish anything or get anything done. Some doubt is well justified… a lot of it isn’t. In life sometimes we are our own worst enemy, and as architects we are definitely our own toughest critics. The only thing I would say to young architects reading this is, do not be too hard on yourselves, and never give in to doubt.

EA: Have you ever reinvented yourself, or made changes to your style or philosophy?

SE: No. I wouldn’t say I’ve changed my philosophy or even my style. The only thing that changes with each new project is the client. Their needs and tastes change as do their budgets. Architects do not like to talk about money or budget, but this really does impact the direction of a design.

EA: Negatively?

SE: No, not at all. Very often the projects where there is a low and very firm budget are the ones that breed the most interesting ideas. This is a bit of cliché, but nevertheless it is true.

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Rooftecture S. Image © Courtesy of Shuhei Endo / Paramodern

Rooftecture S. Image © Courtesy of Shuhei Endo / Paramodern

EA: Would you say that you had a style?

SE: I do not have a style for “shapes,” but I have a style of working – an attitude. I suppose that if I have a style it would be the product of my understanding of space. For me, space cannot exist in isolation, at least not in the context of architecture. I only look at space and how it connects to time. Time is everything. Time can be the movement of the sun’s rays through the space, or can be the coming and going of people. When you are designing space, time is your most important parameter.

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Bubbletecture H. Image © Courtesy of Shuhei Endo / Paramodern

Bubbletecture H. Image © Courtesy of Shuhei Endo / Paramodern

EA: I am not so sure whether what you said about having a style is entirely true… Looking at all your projects and their names (Rooftecture, Halftecture, Springtecture, Glowtecture, Bubbletecture, Looptecture, etc…), would it be fair to say that you have a “product line”?

SE: I see how one could understand that as a product line. The idea of these names and the projects they’re tied to stem from my belief that architecture as a word is limited. I proved this by taking a single component of architecture, like a roof say, and expanding it into an entire building.

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Rooftecture S. Image © Courtesy of Shuhei Endo / Paramodern

Rooftecture S. Image © Courtesy of Shuhei Endo / Paramodern

EA: That sounds like another criticism… which makes me want to ask if any of these projects are in some way a bit satirical?

SE: I wouldn’t say that they were, no.

EA: How can you consolidate such sophisticated ideas on architecture with somewhat childish or at least innocent words like “bubble” and “loop,” along with buildings that embody those words so literally?

SE: Sometimes big and “sophisticated” concepts in architecture are best illustrated by the simplest forms. The famous Pop Artist Roy Lichtenstein used mundane and everyday objects in his art and turned them into icons. I seek to create my own icons, the bubble, the loop and the roof being just a few of them. To me they are not only underexploited, they hold almost infinite possibilities and are beautiful in their simplicity and purity. The very nature of your question exemplifies my criticisms quite well. You say “childish”; I say “playful.” There is no need, and no rule in our profession that says playfulness has no place in architecture. However, in my opinion, there is that implication and here lies the bulk of my gripe. Modernism is a form of Protestantism; a strict set of rules followed religiously by architects, professors and their students without sufficient criticism.

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Rooftecture OT2. Image © Stirling Elmendorf

Rooftecture OT2. Image © Stirling Elmendorf

In 2014, Ebrahim Abdoh spent six months as an intern at Hiroshi Nakamura & NAP. In that time he conducted a number of interviews with the young architects that are forming the next generation of Japanese design leaders; his column, “Japanese Architecture.” presents edited versions of these interviews in order to shed light on the future of Japanese Architecture.

Countdown to Lagos Architect Forum(LAF 7.0) 2016

Ever wondered what the big world of Building Information Modelling [BIM] could mean to your practice whether big or small? Find this out at Lagos Architects Forum 2016!
Listen to Arc. Sola Ige as he discusses this subject.

Meet Arc. Sola Ige MNIA, RIBA

Arc. Sola Ige is a dynamic architect with international exposure. He has had the opportunity of participating in projects in Asia, Europe and in Nigeria. He holds a Bachelor and B.Arch degrees of The Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife. He also has MSc in Construction Management & Economics, Greenwich University, London as well as Post Graduate Diploma in Architecture from the University of Westminster, London.

He is a Member of The Nigerian Institution of Architects (MNIA)and Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA).

Sola’s career has taken through notable firms including : GHK (Associate) 2000 – 2004; Pringle Brandon (2005 – 2006); Gensler (2006 – 2010); PCDA (2012 – 2014.) He is currently an  Associate Partner with Consultants Collaborative Partnership as well as being The Managing Principal at Masterstrokes Design Studios from 2014 till date.

He is a respected facilitator on BIM and you would enjoy hearing him.

Reserve your space with Sola now.

Call +2348098880064, +2348022279111 or +2348066984369 to reserve your place before April 30th, 2016.

Venue : Jasmine and Zinnia Hall, Eko Hotel and Suites
Date : May 4-7, 2016
Time : 9.00 am
Copyright © 2016 Nigerian Institute of Architects, Lagos State Chapter, All rights reserved.
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Vo Trong Nghia Proposes Green City Hall for Bac Ninh City

Vo Trong Nghia Proposes Green City Hall for Bac Ninh City, Courtesy of Vo Trong Nghia Architects
Courtesy of Vo Trong Nghia Architects

Vo Trong Nghia Architects (VTNA) has unveiled a proposal for a Green City Hall in Vietnam’s Bac Ninh City. Designed as a vertical park, the 36,000 square meter proposal is meant to serve as a new symbol for a traditionally agricultural, but rapidly industrializing area of Northern Vietnam. The VTNA proposal is part of a larger plan to develop a new urban area on the edge of the old city, and is designed to be a catalyst for future green developments in the area.

Courtesy of Vo Trong Nghia ArchitectsCourtesy of Vo Trong Nghia ArchitectsCourtesy of Vo Trong Nghia ArchitectsCourtesy of Vo Trong Nghia Architects+8

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Courtesy of Vo Trong Nghia Architects

Courtesy of Vo Trong Nghia Architects

The building is composed of two volumes that lean towards each other – think shuffling cards with a riffle or dovetail method – in a gesture that is meant to symbolize a unity of citizens and government.. Cultural facilities in the structure’s base give way to government offices in one tower with party offices and a citizen center in the other. The two towers culminate in an observation deck.

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Courtesy of Vo Trong Nghia Architects

Courtesy of Vo Trong Nghia Architects

AIA Names Top 10 Most Sustainable Projects of 2016

AIA Names Top 10 Most Sustainable Projects of 2016, The J. Craig Venter Institute; San Diego
/ ZGF Architects LLP. Image © Nick Merrick
The J. Craig Venter Institute; San Diego
/ ZGF Architects LLP. Image © Nick Merrick

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) and its Committee on the Environment (COTE) have selected the top ten sustainable architecture and ecological design projects for 2016.

Now in its 20th year, the COTE Top Ten Awards program honors projects that protect and enhance the environment through an integrated approach to architecture, natural systems, and technology.

A recently released study, entitled Lessons from the Leading Edge, reports that design projects recognized through this program are “outpacing the industry by virtually every standard of performance.”

The 2016 COTE Top Ten Green Projects are:

Biosciences Research Building (BRB); Galway, Ireland
/ Payette and Reddy Architecture + Urbanism

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Biosciences Research Building (BRB); Galway, Ireland
/ Payette and Reddy Architecture + Urbanism . Image © Warren Jagger

Biosciences Research Building (BRB); Galway, Ireland
/ Payette and Reddy Architecture + Urbanism . Image © Warren Jagger

The design of the BRB embraces the moderate climate of Ireland. By locating low-load spaces along the perimeter of the building, the project is able to take advantage of natural ventilation as the sole conditioning strategy for the majority of the year and is supplemented less than 10% of the year with radiant heating. Due to this approach, 45% of this intensive research building is able to function without mechanical ventilation. This is an extremely simple, yet radical approach and is rarely implemented to even a modest extent in similar laboratories in comparable U.S. climates.

Center for Sustainable Landscapes (CSL); Pittsburgh /
The Design Alliance Architects

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Center for Sustainable Landscapes (CSL); Pittsburgh /
The Design Alliance Architects. Image © Denmarsh Photography

Center for Sustainable Landscapes (CSL); Pittsburgh /
The Design Alliance Architects. Image © Denmarsh Photography

The CSL is an education, research and administration facility at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens. Designed to be the greenest building in the world, it generates all of its own energy and treats all storm and sanitary water captured on-site. The CSL is the first and only building to meet four of the highest green certifications: the Living Building Challenge, LEED Platinum, WELL Building Platinum, and Four-Stars Sustainable SITES. As an integral part of the Phipps visitor experience, the CSL focuses attention on the important intersection between the built and natural environments, demonstrating that human and environmental health are inextricably connected.

Exploratorium at Pier 15; San Francisco /
EHDD

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Exploratorium at Pier 15; San Francisco /
EHDD. Image © Bruce Damonte

Exploratorium at Pier 15; San Francisco /
EHDD. Image © Bruce Damonte

The Exploratorium is an interactive science museum that also demonstrates innovation and sustainability in its design and construction. The building takes advantage of the historic pier shed’s natural lighting and the 800-foot-long roof provided room for a 1.3 megawatt photovoltaic array. The water of the bay is used for cooling and heating. Materials were used that are both sustainable and durable enough to withstand a harsh maritime climate. The project is certified LEED Platinum and is close to reaching its goal of being the country’s largest Net Zero energy museum and an industry model for what is possible in contemporary museums.

H-E-B at Mueller; Austin, TX
/ Lake|Flato Architects, H-E-B Design + Construction, Selser Schaefer Architects

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H-E-B at Mueller; Austin, TX
/ Lake|Flato Architects, H-E-B Design + Construction, Selser Schaefer Architects. Image © Casey Dunn

H-E-B at Mueller; Austin, TX
/ Lake|Flato Architects, H-E-B Design + Construction, Selser Schaefer Architects. Image © Casey Dunn

H-E-B at Mueller is an 83,587-square-foot LEED Gold and Austin Energy Green Building 4-Stars retail store and fresh food market, including a pharmacy, café, community meeting room, outdoor gathering spaces, and fuel station. It serves 16 neighborhoods and is located in Mueller, a sustainable, mixed-use urban Austin community. Strategies include a collaborative research, goal-setting and design process; integrated chilled water HVAC and refrigeration systems; the first North American supermarket propane refrigeration system; optimized daylighting; 169 kW roof-top solar array; electric vehicle charging; all LED lighting; and reclaimed water use for landscape irrigation, toilets, and cooling tower make-up water.

Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation; Berkeley, CA /
Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects

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Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation; Berkeley, CA /
Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects. Image © Tim Griffith

Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation; Berkeley, CA /
Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects. Image © Tim Griffith

Founded on the conviction that design can help address some of society’s most pressing challenges, the Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation at UC Berkeley is devoted to introducing sustainable design innovation at the core of university life. The project provides a new interdisciplinary hub for students and teachers from across the university who work at the intersection of design and technology. It is designed as both a collaborative, project-based educational space and a symbol to the region of the University’s commitment to sustainable innovation, modelling high-density / low-carbon living and learning by reducing energy use 90% below national baseline.

Rene Cazenave Apartments; San Francisco
/ Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects and Saida + Sullivan Design Partners, Associated Architect

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Rene Cazenave Apartments; San Francisco
/ Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects and Saida + Sullivan Design Partners, Associated Architect. Image © Tim Griffith

Rene Cazenave Apartments; San Francisco
/ Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects and Saida + Sullivan Design Partners, Associated Architect. Image © Tim Griffith

This supportive housing for formerly chronically homeless individuals replaces a former parking lot and freeway off-ramp with a high density, transit oriented, and healthy living alternative. Filtered ventilation, low emitting materials, ample daylight and views combine to aid the residents, many with mental and physical disabilities. Energy costs for the residents and non-profit owner are minimized by a combination of high efficiency lighting and hydronic heating, a continuously insulated rain-screen building envelope and a roof top solar canopy with both hot water and photovoltaic panels. Water is carefully managed by a vegetated roof, smart irrigation, a courtyard storm water tank and reclaimed water piping.

The Dixon Water Foundation Josey Pavilion; Decatur, TX /
Lake|Flato Architects

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The Dixon Water Foundation Josey Pavilion; Decatur, TX /
Lake|Flato Architects. Image © Casey Dunn

The Dixon Water Foundation Josey Pavilion; Decatur, TX /
Lake|Flato Architects. Image © Casey Dunn

The Josey Pavilion is a multi-functional education and meeting center that supports the mission of the Dixon Water Foundation to promote healthy watersheds through sustainable land management. Traditionally livestock has caused more harm than good by overgrazing and not allowing native prairies to play their important role in habitat and watershed protection, and carbon sequestration. As a certified Living Building, the Josey Pavilion facilitates a deeper understanding of how grazing livestock as well as the built environment can work to do more good than harm. Just like the Heritage Live Oak that defines the site, the building tempers the climate and enhances visitor experience by shading the sun, blocking the wind, and providing protected views.

The J. Craig Venter Institute; San Diego
/ ZGF Architects LLP

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The J. Craig Venter Institute; San Diego
/ ZGF Architects LLP. Image © Nick Merrick

The J. Craig Venter Institute; San Diego
/ ZGF Architects LLP. Image © Nick Merrick

This not-for-profit research institute, dedicated to the advancement of the science of genomics, was in need of a permanent West Coast home. Their commitment to environmental stewardship led to challenging the architects to design a net-zero energy laboratory building, the first in the U.S. The result is a LEED-Platinum certified, 44,607-square-foot building comprised of a wet laboratory wing and an office / dry laboratory wing surrounding a central courtyard, all above a partially below-grade parking structure for 112 cars. The holistic approach to the design revolved around energy performance, water conservation, and sustainable materials.

University of Wyoming – Visual Arts Facility; Laramie, WY
/ Hacker Architects and Malone Belton Able PC

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West Branch of the Berkeley Public Library; Berkeley, CA
/ Harley Ellis Devereaux. Image © Lara Swimmer

West Branch of the Berkeley Public Library; Berkeley, CA
/ Harley Ellis Devereaux. Image © Lara Swimmer

The Visual Arts Facility (VAF) consolidates the fine arts program from its scattered locations throughout the campus. The building provides a teaching and learning environment that is both state-of-the-art in occupational safety and in its concern for discharge of pollutants from building. The roof area is fitted with one of the largest solar evacuated tube installations in the U.S. Heat flows from the evacuated tubes to support the hydronic radiant floors, domestic hot water, and pretreat outside air for ventilation. The building was oriented and shaped through a process of studying the sun’s interaction with interior spaces, simultaneously distributing reflected light while eliminating solar gain.

West Branch of the Berkeley Public Library; Berkeley, CA
/ Harley Ellis Devereaux

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West Branch of the Berkeley Public Library; Berkeley, CA
/ Harley Ellis Devereaux. Image © David Wakely

West Branch of the Berkeley Public Library; Berkeley, CA
/ Harley Ellis Devereaux. Image © David Wakely

The new 9,500-square-foot West Branch of the Berkeley Public Library is the first certified Living Building Challenge zero net energy public library in California. The building’s energy footprint was minimized through integrated strategies for daylighting (the building is 97% daylit), natural ventilation and a high performance building envelope. An innovative wind chimney provides cross-ventilation while protecting the library interior from street noise. Renewable energy on site includes photovoltaic panels and solar thermal panels for radiant heating and cooling and domestic hot water. The library exceeds the 2030 Challenge and complies with Berkeley’s recently-enacted Climate Action Plan.

News, project descriptions, and images via the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

Salerno Maritime Terminal / Zaha Hadid Architects

© Hélène Binet
© Hélène Binet

© Hélène Binet© Hélène Binet© Hélène Binet© Hélène Binet+25

  • ZHA Design Team

    Vincenzo Barilari, Andrea Parenti, Anja Simons, Giovanna Sylos Labini, Cedric Libert, Filippo Innocenti, Paolo Zilli, Lorenzo Grifantini,
  • ZHA Competition Team

    Paola Cattarin, Sonia Villaseca, Christos Passas, Chris Dopheide
  • Local Executive Architect

    Interplan Seconda – Alessandro Gubitosi
  • Costing

    Building Consulting – Pasquale Miele
  • Structural Engineers

    Ingeco – Francesco Sylos Labini, Ove Arup & Partners (prelim. design) – Sophie Le Bourva
  • M&E Engineers

    Macchiaroli and Partners – Roberto Macchiaroli, Itaca srl – Felice Marotta, Ove Arup & Partners (prelim. design)
  • Maritime/Transport Engineering

    Ove Arup & Partners (London) – Greg Heigh
  • Lighting

    Equation Lighting Design (London) – Mark Hensmann
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© Hélène Binet

© Hélène Binet

From the architect. Inaugurated on 25 April 2016, the new Salerno Maritime Terminal by Zaha Hadid Architects is integral to the city’s urban plan. Begun by Mayor Vincenzo De Luca, now Governor of the Campania Region, and continued under the city’s current Mayor Vincenzo Napoli, the 1993 plan forSalerno targeted the development of essential projects and programs for the social, economic and environmental regeneration of the city. As part of the 1993 plan, Zaha Hadid Architects won the international competition in 2000 to design the new terminal.

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Site Plan

Site Plan

Located on the public quay that extends into Salerno’s working harbor and marina, the new maritime terminal continues the city’s relationship with the sea and establishes new links; connecting Salerno’s rich maritime traditions with its historic urban fabric and beyond to the hills that frame the city.

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© Hélène Binet

© Hélène Binet

Like an oyster, the terminal’s hard, asymmetric shell protects the softer elements within; sheltering passengers from the intense Mediterranean sun during the popular tourist season.

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© Hélène Binet

© Hélène Binet

The new maritime terminal is composed of three primary interlocking components: administration offices for national border controls and shipping lines; the terminal for international ferries and cruise ships from around the world; and the terminal for the local and regional ferries.

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© Hélène Binet

© Hélène Binet
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Floor Plans

Floor Plans
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© Hélène Binet

© Hélène Binet

The quayside gently rises as passengers approach the terminal from the city, indicating the gradually sloping path of ramps within the building which raise passengers to the embarking level of large ships and ferries. The terminal’s interior arrangement orientates and leads passengers through a sequence of interior spaces that flow into each other and are organized around focal points such as the restaurant and the waiting lounge.

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© Hélène Binet

© Hélène Binet

Local and regional ferry commuters move through the terminal quickly, arriving on ground level and ascending via ramps to reach the upper and vessel entrance. Passengers travelling on international ferries and cruise ships are guided seamlessly through check-in, passport, security and customs controls to their ship. Arriving passengers follow a similar progression through the terminal with the inclusion of the luggage reclaim area.

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Sections

Sections

At night, the glow of the terminal near the harbour entrance will act as a lighthouse to the port, welcoming visitors to the city.

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© Hélène Binet

© Hélène Binet

The new terminal operates, both functionally and visually, as a smooth transition between land and sea; a coastal land formation that mediates between solid and liquid.
From its terraces and windows, the terminal offers spectacular views of the Amalfi Coast, the Gulf ofSalerno and the Cilento. Positano, Capri, Paestum and Pompei are also nearby. The new terminal will greatly improve the accessibility and experience for visitors to the region’s renowned cultural attractions, coastline and countryside.

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© Hélène Binet

© Hélène Binet

The new Salerno Maritime Terminal will enable the port of Salerno to increase arrivals of ferry and cruise ships by 500,000 additional passengers each year, which would create up to 2,000 new jobs in the city’s hospitality, services and retail sectors.

Spotlight: William Pereira

Courtesy of UC Irvine Special Collections and Archives
Courtesy of UC Irvine Special Collections and Archives

Winner of the 1942 Acadamy Award for Best Special Effects, William Pereira (April 25, 1909 – November 13, 1985) also designed some of America’s most iconic examples of futurist architecture, with his heavy stripped down functionalism becoming the symbol of many US institutions and cities. Working with his more prolific film-maker brother Hal Pereira, William Pereira’s talent as an art director translated into a long and prestigious career creating striking and idiosyncratic buildings across the West Coast of America.

Transamerica Pyramid. Image Courtesy of Flickr user jkz licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0Thene Building, LAX. Image © Flickr user Arch_sam licensed under CC BY 2.0Jack Langson Library at University of California (Irvine). Image Courtesy of Wikimedia user TFNorman (public domain)Geisel Library. Image © Darren Bradley+12

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Geisel Library. Image © Darren Bradley

Geisel Library. Image © Darren Bradley
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Transamerica Pyramid. Image Courtesy of Flickr user jkz licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Transamerica Pyramid. Image Courtesy of Flickr user jkz licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Born to Portugese immigrants in Chicago, Pereira graudated from the University of Illinois and rapidly established himself as a prominent figure, designing a few notable Art Deco buildings and helping to draft the masterplan for the 1933 Chicago World’s Fair. Moving to Los Angles and becoming involved in the film industry with his brother Hal in 1930, it wasn’t until his partnership with Charles Luckman in the 1950s that his distinctive style of heavy masses with stripped down detailing emerged, becoming increasingly radical as his career progressed.

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Thene Building, LAX. Image © Flickr user Arch_sam licensed under CC BY 2.0

Thene Building, LAX. Image © Flickr user Arch_sam licensed under CC BY 2.0
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University of California, Irvine, 1966. Image Courtesy of Orange County Archives

University of California, Irvine, 1966. Image Courtesy of Orange County Archives

In 1958 Pereira & Luckman completed perhaps their most famous work, the Googie-styled Theme Building at Los Angles International Airport. Splitting from Luckman in 1959 and forming his own, independent practice, Pereira’s work became a whirlwind of concrete, completing as many as 250 projects in the 1960s and 1970s, and working on increasingly high profile landmark commissions. His austere geometrical style was soon to be seen in pyramids, ziggurats and domes in a variety of areas along the West Coast, including the San Diego International Airport (1959), plans and buildings for campuses for theUniversities of Southern CaliforniaCalifornia (Irvine) and Pepperdine, the sprawling Los Angles County Museum of Art, and of course his two most prominent landmarks: the inverted ziggurat of the Geisel Library and perhaps the most recognizable building in San Francisco, the Transamerica Pyramid.

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Jack Langson Library at University of California (Irvine). Image Courtesy of Wikimedia user TFNorman (public domain)

Jack Langson Library at University of California (Irvine). Image Courtesy of Wikimedia user TFNorman (public domain)
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Pacific Life Headquarters, Newport Beach. Image © Wikimedia user Coolcaesar licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

Pacific Life Headquarters, Newport Beach. Image © Wikimedia user Coolcaesar licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

Pereira’s forays into urban planning were also suitably monolithic, for example the masterplan for theCalifornian city of Irvine, a tightly regulated planned city around the campus of the University of California. Initially planning for a new city of 50,000, Irvine’s regimented plan of individually planned and styled villages has since swelled to more than 4 times that size. His plan for the university, with starkbrutalist buildings jutting out of the hillside on concrete platforms, formed an academic island within the suburbs he designed.

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University of California, Irvine Campus, at the center of Pereira's planned development at Irvine. Image © Wikimedia user Poppashoppa22 licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

University of California, Irvine Campus, at the center of Pereira’s planned development at Irvine. Image © Wikimedia user Poppashoppa22 licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0
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Transamerica Pyramid. Image Courtesy of Flickr user jkz licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Transamerica Pyramid. Image Courtesy of Flickr user jkz licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Find out more about one of Pereira’s most famous works, the Geisel Library at the University of California San Diego, via the thumbnails below:

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