Herzog & de Meuron Release Updated Images of the New Chelsea FC Stadium in London

Following the announcement earlier this year that Herzog & de Meuron were developing designs for a new £500million stadium for Chelsea Football Club, the Swiss practice have released a series of official images which narrate the project’s design intentions and contextual implications. The new stadium, which will be built in place of the football club’s existing stadium at Stamford Bridge, will contain a “three-tier, four-stand, bowl with a capacity of 60,000 supporters” (compared to the current 41,837 capacity) and have around 60,000sqm of facilities housed within its ribbed shell.

© Herzog & de Meuron© Herzog & de Meuron© Herzog & de Meuron© Herzog & de Meuron

© Herzog & de Meuron

© Herzog & de Meuron

The irregular volume of the stadium will fill the site and feature 264 slender brick piers “inspired by Gothic architecture and nearby Victorian-era brick terraces” which will wrap the entire structure. Above the pitch, the irregular shape will be resolved into a circular peak, descending towards the centre of the design to form a rectangular opening above the pitch.

© Herzog & de Meuron

© Herzog & de Meuron

According to the planning statement, as reported by the Architects’ Journal, “the structure will have a lightness of expression when viewed directly but also a solidity and textural materiality when seen obliquely. As the design evolved,” it added, “the mass of the building significantly reduced, decreasing the impact of the new stadium on surrounding buildings. The external appearance became more open, moving from imposing brick walls to a visually open structure, a subtle and functional response to the historical context of the more open, popular and congregational character of earlier generations of the stadium.”

© Herzog & de Meuron

© Herzog & de Meuron

Elevations submitted for planning proposal. Image © Herzog & de Meuron

Elevations submitted for planning proposal. Image © Herzog & de Meuron

© Herzog & de Meuron

The project is now awaiting planning permission and, if passed, will be completed by 2020.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s