CONTEMPORARY WALL LIGHT / POLYCARBONATE / LED / LINEAR T-LINER

contemporary wall light / polycarbonate / LED / linear

Characteristics

  • Style:

    contemporary

  • Material:

    polycarbonate

  • Light source:

    LED

  • Shape:

    linear

  • Protection class:

    IP20

  • Color:

    white

Description

T-LINER 100 83 DOWN-UP WW
FixationWall Surface mounted
Recessed depthn.a.
Thickness of mounting surfacen.a.
InformationINCL.1 x PC SBL
INCL.2 x LED CLUSTER 14,7W / 3000K / 1960lm
INCL.LED POWER SUPPLY 700mA-DC
CRICRI 80
Colour tempWarm White (+3000K)
LED Technics (light source)3920 lm // 29 W // 134 lm/W
LED Technics (luminaire)3087 lm // 34 W // 91 lm/W
Electrical220-240V / 50-60Hz
ClassClass I
Nett weight1.9 Kg
IPIP20

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Herzog & de Meuron Release Revised Plans for Museum of 20th Century Design in Berlin

Herzog & de Meuron Release Revised Plans for Museum of 20th Century Design in Berlin, Museum of the 20th Century. Image Courtesy of Herzog & de Meuron

Museum of the 20th Century. Image Courtesy of Herzog & de Meuron

Swiss practice Herzog & de Meuron have released revised plans for the Museum of the 20th Century project in Berlin‘s Cultural Forum. Designed to house the extensive National Gallery on 20th century art collection, the project was made in partnership with the Berlin State Museums and the Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation. Herzog & de Meuron originally won the competition to design the museum building in 2016, and the revised design features new plans and a facade that opens the building to the outside.

Museum of the 20th Century. Image Courtesy of Herzog & de MeuronMuseum of the 20th Century. Image Courtesy of Herzog & de MeuronMuseum of the 20th Century. Image Courtesy of Herzog & de MeuronMuseum of the 20th Century. Image Courtesy of Herzog & de Meuron+ 9

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Museum of the 20th Century. Image Courtesy of Herzog & de Meuron

Museum of the 20th Century. Image Courtesy of Herzog & de Meuron

In November 2014, the German Bundestag decided to donate 200 million EUR to help fund the new building. Made to respect the nearby Mies van der Rohe and Hans Scharoun structures, the Museum of the 20th Century is located between the Neue Nationalgalerie and the Berlin Philharmonie. Playing on a typical house form with a large gabled volume, the project alludes to familiar shapes and construction methods in barns, warehouses and rail stations. Taking cues from the from the Matthäuskirche, the design also includes multiple entrances that are oriented to establish connections with the city.

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Museum of the 20th Century. Image Courtesy of Herzog & de Meuron

Museum of the 20th Century. Image Courtesy of Herzog & de Meuron
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Museum of the 20th Century. Image Courtesy of Herzog & de Meuron

Museum of the 20th Century. Image Courtesy of Herzog & de Meuron

Partner Jacques Herzog has stated that, “the many reactions to the competition design in the media, from experts and the public alike, have shown how significant this project is, and served as a motivational force for its further development. Our urban planning concept for the kulturforum is a concept of density, not of emptiness. it organizes an interplay of buildings put into precise relation with each other. and it also initiates the interaction of the cultural institutions established in those buildings.”

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Museum of the 20th Century. Image Courtesy of Herzog & de Meuron

Museum of the 20th Century. Image Courtesy of Herzog & de Meuron

Internationally important holdings will be presented permanently and together for the first time: the holdings of the National Gallery on 20th century art, the Marx and Pietzsch collections, parts of the Marzona collection anchored in the Staatliche Museen, and works from the Kupferstichkabinett. The works will be exhibited both in the basement of the Neue Nationalgalerie and in the exhibition rooms of the new building. Rising four floors, the museum will be open to the public. The program includes different exhibition areas and rooms for art education, as well as space for groups, a visitor service area, a multi-functional media room, and a cafe.

The current plans will be shown in a small exhibition in the foyer of the Kulturforum until November 2018. The design phase is scheduled to be complete by summer 2019, with the groundbreaking ceremony scheduled for the end of 2019.

RMJM-designed St. Regis Zhuhai hotel and office tower is about to open its doors

One of China’s flagship green cities, Zhuhai strikes a fine balance between innovative, thriving business hubs and ventures for clean energy and green industry. The St. Regis Zhuhai hotel & office tower, the latest addition to the Zhuhai Shizimen Central Business District, is the very epitome of this.

Opening its doors to the public on the 18th of October 2018, the structure has already been recognised by the Zhuhai Government as the tallest building in the city, with the tip towering 328.8 metres above the ground. Local government figures have hailed it as “China’s new architectural landmark”, largely down to its size, environmentally-friendly credentials, plush exterior and the design’s scenic connotations.

After being commissioned by the Huafa Group, who is responsible for the development of the wider business district, RMJM drew inspiration from Zhuhai’s unique rock formations, taking advantage of the surrounding southern and eastern views to design landscapes and gardens which virtually flow into the building, blurring internal and external divisions. The slender build is already a standout sight of the Shizimen development, which is currently undergoing work with the rest of the Zhuhai CBD, allowing it to grow not only financially, but also culturally.

Zhuhai-St-Regis-Tower

On top of being known for its scenery, the surrounding area is known for its economic prosperity. The Zhuhai Shizimen Central Business District, a coastal area occupying a site of 26.96 hectares, is at the very centre of this. Alongside the hotel and office tower, visitors to the CBD can find exhibition and convention centres which are used as a meeting place for businesses and like-minded individuals from both Zhuhai, nearby regions such as Guangdong, Macau and Hong Kong, and the wider world. Otherwise, visitors will be able to enjoy an international 5-star hotel, a business and retail ribbon and serviced apartment buildings.

It’s no small wonder that, so soon after its completion, the building has made headlines all over the world, being praised for its exuberant, harmonious, but above all, stylish office tower design. Besides the buildings aesthetics, here are three must-know facts about the Zhuhai St. Regis hotel & office tower.

St. Regis Zhuhai hotel & office tower — three key facts

  • The tower itself occupies 484,512 metres squared above ground and 11,370 metres squared below ground.
  • Comprising a total of 68 floors, the St. Regis Zhuhai hotel & office tower is the 71st tallest in the world and the 32nd tallest in China.
  • Staying true to the structure’s green credentials, the heart of the site occupied by the building is a vehicular-free zone. Capitalising on this, the immediate surrounding area has been made into a selection of verdant, pedestrian-friendly plazas, with the drop-off loop connected via sunken garden landscape elements.
Zhuhai-St-Regis-Tower-Closer

The design principles

The Zhuhai Tower and surrounding development are built on environmentally-friendly design principles such as shading and orientation, while office spaces in the development are limited to being 18-22 metres wide to ensure natural ventilation. By incorporating environmental screens in the design, the mixed-use development manages to minimise any heat gain which may accrue. Undulating screens are also used in the nearby Sheraton Hotel’s facades to both activate elevation and provide clear open views for guests, which are simultaneously hidden from sight from the pedestrian crossings below.

This highlights the tower’s environmental design values, with all functional spaces (including the car parks) geared towards maximising natural daylight and ventilation. Construction of the tower finished in September 2017, with the finished building comprising a 250-key St. Regis hotel tower and Grade A office spacing.

The bigger picture

RMJM’s latest design is one part of the wider Zhuhai Shizimen masterplan, which consists of 640,000 square metres of accommodation. The first phase of the mixed-use development comprises 362,000 square metres of convention, theatre, banquet and exhibition facilities, working to further cement Zhuhai and the Pearl River Delta’s reputation as a modern hub of infrastructure and culture.

As well as these public and civic functions, the development is home to retail and food outlets, serviced apartments and a 548-key Sheraton Hotel, along with the St. Regis hotel tower and inbuilt office spaces.

RMJM’s St. Regis Zhuhai hotel & office tower (or the Zhuhai Tower) isn’t RMJM’s first project in the city, with other key projects including the spiralling 100-metre high Zhuhai Observation Tower (which is still under construction) and the multi-use, 646,500-square metre luxury Heart of Zhuhai development. The tower sits among other notable landmarks, like the Macau Tower and high-rise apartments which have been scheduled to be built across the water as part of the Shizimen development.

Thanks to its success, the Shizimen CBD project has triggered the development of the entire Hengqin area, in what is set to be an exciting new era of construction for southern China.  Learn more about the St. Regis Zhuhai hotel & office tower and browse related projects in the portfolio section of our website.

News:Via RMJM

CONTEMPORARY WALL LIGHT / OUTDOOR / ALUMINUM / LED TIGA

contemporary wall light / outdoor / aluminum / LED

Characteristics

  • Style:

    contemporary

  • Location:

    outdoor

  • Material:

    aluminum

  • Light source:

    LED

  • Shape:

    rectangular

  • Protection class:

    IP65

  • Other characteristics:

    dimmable, commercial

  • Color:

    white, black, gray

Description

TIGA IN LED 92724 DIM8
FixationWall Surface mounted
Recessed depthn.a.
Thickness of mounting surfacen.a.
InformationINCL.1 x LED WHITE 7,1W / CRI>90 / 2700K / 743lm
INCL.DIMMABLE LED POWER SUPPLY 350mA-DC
MAINS DIMMING – TRAILING EDGE
CRICRI 90
Colour tempHalogen White (+2700K)
LED Technics (light source)743 lm // 7 W // 111 lm/W
LED Technics (luminaire)399 lm // 8 W // 49 lm/W
Electrical220-240V / 50-60Hz
ClassClass I
Nett weight1.3 Kg
IPIP20

Le Corbusier’s Paintings Showcased for the First Time Since 1966

Trois baigneuses, 1935. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAP

Trois baigneuses, 1935. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAP

They say one cannot separate art from the artist, or perhaps in this case, the artist from the architect. Arguably one of the most criticized architects, Le Corbusier is often portrayed as cold and controlling. Depicting his more dreamy and humorous nature, the Nasjonalmuseet‘s exhibition titled, “Le Corbusier by the Sea,” draws upon his memories from his summer travels along the coast of southwest France.

Hosted in Villa Stenersen, one of the National Museum’s venues, the exhibition showcases Le Corbusier’s work as an artist during the period 1926-36. Not only does the exhibition include fifteen of his reproduced paintings alongside a collection of sketches, but also screens two films from Le Corbusier’s own footage of his surrounding views.

Trois figures de femme et chien. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAPBaigneuse, barque et coquillage. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAPLe déjeuner près du pare, 1928. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAPLa pêcheuse d'huitres, 1935. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAP+ 8

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La pêcheuse d'huitres, 1935. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAP

La pêcheuse d’huitres, 1935. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAP

Like most creative minds, Le Corbusier had a special place to find inspiration. Le Piquey, his treasure trove for ideas, was a place where he simply became Charles-Édouard Jeanneret again, sketching incessantly and freely. Once he arrived back to his Parisian studio, he would rework his drawings into paintings, cementing his thoughts to canvas.

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Baigneuse, barque et coquillage. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAP

Baigneuse, barque et coquillage. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAP

As a co-creator of the Purist style, Le Corbusier’s paintings depict his fascination with the geometries of mundane objects to either emphasize or deconstruct typological forms, informing his early architectural studies. The curation of the artwork from his time spent specifically at Le Piquey aims to highlight how often he drew inspiration from nature and the environment around him. Lesser known is the extent to which these influences impacted his architectural style and even choice of materials.

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Le déjeuner près du pare, 1928. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAP

Le déjeuner près du pare, 1928. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAP

I am drawn to places where people live naturally. Le Piquey is full of life that is healthy, calm and to scale: to a human scale…This is what civilizations destroy, plunging people into artifice and misfortune.
Le Corbusier in a letter to his mother, 1932

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Le Corbusier & Yvonne Gallis. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAP

Le Corbusier & Yvonne Gallis. Image © The Foundation Le Corbusier / FLC ADGAP

Whether liked or disliked, Le Corbusier still remains a deeply faceted individual in the scheme of his larger public identity. Perhaps he only wanted a simple life by the sea, or perhaps the short-lived escapes from the city were enough, but in either case, Le Piquey served as an integral part in formulating his architectural ideologies.

The exhibition curated by Bruno Hubert, Tim Benton, and Talette Simonsen will run until December 16.

News via Nasjonalmuseet

Architecture Film Festival Rotterdam Explores “Building Happiness” in Historic and Contemporary Design

Architecture Film Festival Rotterdam Explores "Building Happiness" in Historic and Contemporary Design

In recent years, architecture film festivals have erupted around the globe providing critics, theorists, and all architectural thinkers with an additional median for architectural expression and discussion. The symbiotic relationship between architecture and film stems from architecture’s effect on its built environment and its determined social/cultural impact.

As the international audience grows and new genres emerge, architecture film festivals have come to encompass more than just the film’s initial viewing; programs, lectures, and discussions are organized, enhancing the intellectual impact of the viewing material. Architecture Film Festival Rotterdam (AFFR) is celebrating its tenth edition this October by exploring the concept of “building happiness” in an age when we seek to build a more sustainable world – a challenge for both historic and contemporary design.

1. Mole Man

From the creator: “Mole Man tells the touching story of Ron Heist, a 66-year-old man with Autism, who has been working on an elaborate building in his parents’ backyard since 1965. Built without cement or nails, the building has fifty rooms by now. The structure can bear its own weight due to the careful way it has been stacked. Although his continual building process keeps him happy and satisfied, his family and friends are beginning to worry about Ron. Where will he end up when his 90-year-old mother passes away?”

2. Do More with Less

From the creator: “A film that touches the foundations of architecture: how to be inspired by the limited resources and limited use of materials to create interesting architectural feats. Many young architects in Latin America are forced by necessity to work in such circumstances but see it less as a limitation than a challenge. Do More With Less offers a view of optimistic and inspiring architecture Inspiration to get straight to work!”

3. Frey: The Architectural Envoy

From the creator: “He was one of the architects that shaped the optimistic, modernist style in Palm Springs in the 1950s and ’60. Born in Switzerland, Albert Frey worked on the Villa Savoye with Le Corbusier, but his passion for new materials and daring structures did not come to full fruition until he came to America. His streamlined aesthetic appealed to lots of Hollywood stars who wanted to build a house in Palm Springs. The film is the first half of a two-part portrait of Albert Frey. The second half is expected in the spring of 2019.”

4. Jean Nouvel: Reflections

From the creator: “Pritzker Prize-winning architect Jean Nouvel is at the height of an already legendary career. At age 70, he circles the globe, tending to such monumental projects as The Louvre Abu Dhabi, The National Museum of Qatar and The National Museum of China. Among the most innovative, thought-provoking and rebellious architects of his generation, Nouvel reflects on his work, as well as his design philosophy.”

5. Kevin Roche: The Quiet Architect

From the creator: He worked with Maxwell Fry and Eero Saarinen, he won the Pritzker Prize, and his immense oeuvre reflects that past 70 years of American history. Sculptural, iconic, with a powerful flair for drama, and always – in line with his Irish roots – in close communication with nature. This feature documentary film about 96-year-old Kevin Roche offers an intriguing overview of an exceptional architect’s oeuvre, focusing on the versatile nature of an era when America was still optimistic.

6. Planeta Petrila

From the creator: “The coal mine in the Romanian town of Petrila is more than a mine. To the city’s inhabitants, it is their life, their source of income, and the pivotal point of the community. But the mine is closing down, and European regulations dictate total demolition. Former mineworker and artist Ion Barbu decides to make every effort to prevent the mine’s destruction. He uses his art to keep the spirit of the mine alive, resulting in absurd imagery. ‘Europe is just a continent. Petrila is a world.’”

7.Portrait of a Gallery

From the creator: “The National Gallery in Dublin is the most important museum in Ireland. Like the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, the National Gallery was recently renovated. Cameras followed the renovations for three years. As is apparently common practice in such matters, the renovations encountered delays and turned out to be far more expensive than estimated and projected. How does a country handle its national cultural heritage?  Film for people who love The New National Gallery.”

News via Architectural Film Festival Rotterdam

RECESSED CEILING LIGHT FIXTURE / LED / ROUND / CANVAS

recessed ceiling light fixture / LED / round / canvas

Characteristics

  • Type:

    recessed ceiling

  • Light source:

    LED

  • Shape:

    round

  • Material:

    canvas

  • Other characteristics:

    dimmable, acoustic

Description

Lighting of a private dining room

In this project we had to work differently to meet the demand of the architecture firm. The specific shape of the skylight forced us to leave the acoustic stretched canvas disc in the ceiling waiting for the ceiling in the staff to manufacture.

Once the ceiling was completed we set up our lighting system and the acoustic circle.

The lighting is ensured by dimmable warm white LED.

Personnal pad

The set is managed by a touch pad to ensure live settings.

The result is powerful.